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Full text of "Annual reports"

MEDFIELD 

331 ST ANNUAL REPORT 

of the 

TOWN OFFICERS 




1981 



TOWN OF HEDFIELD 
ANNUAL REPORT/1981 



1 



30 703 

REF/974.74/T0 



331 st Anniversary 




ANNUAL REPORT 

of the 
TOWN OFFICERS 

FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31 , 1981 



FOR REFERENCE 

Do Not Take From This Room 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/annualreports1981medf 



IN MEMORIAM 



William E. McCarthy 

Selectman 1946 - 1955 

Superintendent of Streets 1956 - 1973 

Superintendent of Streets, Water & Sewer 1973 - 1981 

Past President, Massachusetts Highway Association 

Chairman, Massachusetts Highway Association Legislative Committee 

Member, Medfield Industrial Development Finance Authority 

Bill was the type of person one has the privilege of knowing only once in a lifetime. 
His life was dedicated to his Town, the residents and his fellow employees. He dis- 
played a rare professional ability and attitude toward his fellowman. Bill always 
did his best, which was always superior. He was a shining example of municipal 
service, he was a humble man, and a faithfilled individual who had his priorities in 
order. 

He loved Medfield. Medfield loved him. We will continue to miss him and appreciate 
the fruits of his labor, - his study of the Town's history, his foresight and plan- 
ning for the future of our Town. 

3 



IN MEMORIAM 



Kenneth R. Clark 
Firefighter 1 921 - 1 961 Fire Chief 1 961 - 1 965 



Chester E. Gilmore 
Firefighter 1926 -1965 

Leo G. Kelly 

Registrar of Voters 1965 - 1971 

Audit Committee Member 1978 - 1981 



FACTS ABOUT MEDFIELD 



Population as of January 1, 1981 
Assessed Valuation 1981 
Tax Rate: 



1/1/81 - 6/30/81 
7/1/81 - 12/31/81 



10,652 

$236,600,500. 

28.30 
24.70 



Area 14.43 Square Miles 

Miles of Highway 65.64 

Elevation at Town Hall approximately 180 feet above mean sea level. 
Medfield is in the following Voting Districts: 



10th District 

Representative to Congress 



2nd District 

Governor's Councillor 



Norfolk, Bristol and Middlesex District 
State Senator 



8th Middlesex District 



Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
United States Senators 



Margaret M. Heckler 
30 Colburn Road 
Wellesley Hills, MA 02181 



George F. Cronin, Jr. 
58 Cerdan Avenue 
Boston, MA 



David H. Locke 
15 Ordway Road 
Wellesley Hills, MA 02181 

Andrew S. Natsios 
234 Courtland Street 
Holliston, MA 01746 



Edward M. Kennedy 
J.F.K. Memorial Building 
Boston, MA 02203 

Paul E. Tsongas 

J.F.K. Memorial Building 

Boston, MA 02203 



Number of Registered Voters as of December 31, 1981: 



Democrats 1 ,044 
Republicans 1,365 
Independents 3,369 



Ralph C. Copeland 



Nancy J. Preston 



AMMUAN REPORT 
TOWN OFFICERS 



MODERATOR 



TOWN CLERK 



TREASURER 



Term Expires 
1982 

1982 



Edward F. Barrett, Jr. 



1984 



Nancy J. Preston 



William R. Reagan , Resigned 
Kenneth M. Childs, Jr. * 
Richard P. DeSorgher 
Robert J. Larkin 



COLLECTOR OF TAXES 



SELECTMEN 



1983 



1982 
1982 
1983 
1984 



ASSESSORS 



Joseph S. Kennedy 
Roger E. Hardy 
Melville J. Mills 



Barbara J. Tupper 
William H. Finley 
Jane B. Jackson 
John T. Harney 
W- David Stephenson 



Arthur W. Brodeur 
Martin Gottlieb 
Diane Bishop-Ellsworth 
Patricia S. Kallio 
Elizabeth L. Martin 
David F. Temple 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



TRUSTEES OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY 



1982 
1983 
1984 



1982 
1983 
1983 
1984 
1984 



1982 
1982 
1983 
1983 
1984 
1984 



* Elected to fill unexpired term 



PLANNING BOARD 



Term Expires 



Robert A. Kinsman 
Daniel V. Fritzsche 
Margaret E. Bancroft 
C. Richard McCullough 
Daniel W. Nye 



1982 
1983 
1984 
1985 
1986 



PARK COMMISSIONERS 



John E. Nichols 


1982 


Warren E. Sheard 


1982 


William J. Heller 


1983 


Richard E. Nicker son 


1983 


Paul Allen 


1984 


Sandra Fitch 


1984 


Mary V. Gillis 


1984 


HOUSING AUTHORITY 




Jane N. Kelly, State appointed 


September 10, 1981 


Peter A. Gaines 


1982 


James R. Ryan 


1983 


Thomas J. Donovan 


1984 


Elizabeth L. Martin 


1985 


FIRE CHIEF 





Joseph E. Ryan 

CHIEF OF POLICE 

William H. Mann 

SERGEANTS 



Patrick W. Clancy 



Robert B. Ripley 
POLICE OFFICERS 



George W. Kingsbur] 



Anthony A. Bertone 
Richard D. Bishop 
Robert W. Brady 
Patrick J. Caulfield 
John T. Garvey, Jr. 
Ronald E. Kerr 



Robert E. Meaney, Jr, 
Robert E. Naughton 
Kevin W. Robinson 
Robert D. Roy 
Raymond J. Wheeler 



PERMANENT INTERMITTENT PATROLMEN 



Aldo D. D'Angelo 
Ruth A. Gaffey 
Robert R. Grover 
Richard Kelcourse 



Patricia A. Knowles 
Eileen F. O'Brien 
Stephen P. Saulnier 
Robert G.V. Taylor 



PLUMBING INSPECTOR 
George E. Nye 
7 



APPOINTMENTS MADE BY SELECTMEN 



EXECUTIVE SECRETARY 

Michael J. Sullivan 

SUPERINTENDENT OF STREETS, WATER AND SEWER 

William E. McCarthy, Deceased 
Kenneth P. Feeney * 



Michael J. Sullivan 



Charles Fuller, Jr, 



TOWN ACCOUNTANT 



TOWN COUNSEL 



BOARD OF HEALTH 



Thomas A. Caragliano 
Carol Ann Nye * 
Richard H. Whelan, Resigned 
Hope M. Wallingford 



CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS 



Walter F. Reynolds, Jr. 
Michael J. Rogers 
H. Tracy Mitchell 

WATER AND SEWER COMMISSIONERS 

John D. Williams 

John A. Rose, Jr. 

Leland D. Beverage 

Harry C. Merrow, Associate Member 

SUPERINTENDENT OF INSECT PEST CONTROL 

Ellis N. Allen 

TREE WARDEN 

Ellis N. Allen 

FIELD DRIVERS AND FENCE VIEWERS 

Rebel L. Palumbo 

* Appointed to fill unexpired term 



Term Expires 
1982 



1982 
1982 



1982 



1982 
1983 
1983 
1984 



1982 
1983 
1984 



1982 
1983 
1984 
1982 



1982 



1982 



1982 



DOG OFFICER 



Term Expires 



Karen MacGregor 

Ruth II. Gaffey, Assistant 



INSPECTION OF ANIMALS 



June 30. 



1982 
1981 



Karen MacGregor 

Wilbur M. Salter, D.V.M. , Assistant 



1982 
1982 



POUND KEEPER 



Roy Owen 



1982 



INSPECTION DEPARTMENT 



Rebel L. Palumbo, Inspector of Buildings 

John P. 0' Toole, Local Inspector of Buildings 

Walter H. Tortorici, Jr., Local Inspector of Buildings 

Walter R. Nye, Gas Inspector 

George E. Nye, Assistant Gas Inspector 

George E. Nye, Plumbing Inspector 

Walter R. Nye, Assistant Plumbing Inspector 

Joseph F. Erskine, Wiring Inspector 

Thomas J. O'Toole, Assistant Wiring Inspector 

Tauno 0. Aalto, Acting Inspector of Wires 



1982 
1982 
1982 
1982 
1982 
1982 
1982 
1982 
1982 
1981 



OFFICIAL GREETER OF THE TOWN OF MEDFIELD 



Joseph L. Marcionette 



1982 



OFFICIAL KEEPER OF THE TOWN CLOCK 



Austin C. Buchanan 

Robert E. Kennedy, Assistant 



1982 
1982 



Beatrice Bangs 
John F. Ganley 
Mary MairEtienne 



BOARD OF REGISTRARS 



VETERANS' DEPARTMENT 



1982 
1983 
1984 



Paul F. Curran, Director, Agent, Burial Agent 
G. Marshall Chick, Graves Officer 



1982 
1982 



COLLECTOR OF WATER AND SEWER USE CHARGES 



Nancy J. Preston 



1983 



SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 



Patricia A. Rioux 



1982 



MEASURER OF WOOD AND BARK 



Thomas F. Anastasi, Jr. 



Term Expires 
1982 



PUBLIC WEIGHER 



Patricia A. Rioux 



1982 



CONSTABLES AND KEEPERS OF THE LOCK UP 



Anthony A. Bertone 
Richard D. Bishop 
Robert W. Brady 
Patrick J. Caulfield 
Patrick W. Clancy 
Robert Currie 
John T. Garvey 
Lawrence Goldman 
Robert G. Grover 
Ronald E. Kerr 
George W. Kingsbury 



William H. Mann 
Robert E. Meaney, Jr. 
Michael Mushnick 
Robert E. Naughton 
Robert B. Ripley 
Kevin W. Robinson 
Robert D. Roy 
Stephen Saulnier 
Robert G. Taylor 
Raymond J. Wheeler 



POLICE INTERNS 



Paul A. Boychuck 
Robert H. Leverone 
Carol Ann Palmieri 
Patricia Rioux 
Christopher J. Sheehy 



December 


31, 


1981 


December 


31, 


1981 


December 


31, 


1981 


December 


31, 


1981 


December 


31, 


1981 



SCHOOL TRAFFIC SUPERVISORS AND POLICE MATRONS 



Gretchen B. Childs 
Elizabeth R. Hinkley 
Priscilla Mahoney 
Elisabeth T. Mann 
Susan A. Medina 
Mary T. Nyren 
Patricia A. Rioux 



April 1982 
April 1982 
April 1982 
April 1982 
April 1982 
April 1982 
April 1982 



POLICE MATRONS 



Jessie A. Erskine 
Mary I. MairEtienne 



April 1982 
April 1982 



SPECIAL POLICE OFFICERS 



Albert Baima 
Bruce A. Berry 
Paul A. Boychuck 
Leo M. Brennan 
Albert Brown 
James Brown 
Chester A. Burks 
Herbert L. Burr 
James Campbell 
William Carlson 



Herbert Carr 
Joseph Carvahlo 
Vincent M. Cellucci 
Mario R. Centamore, Jr 
Kenneth M. Childs, Jr. 
Clinton M. Clark 
Joseph Concannon 
Walter Curley 
Robert E. Currie 
Richard DeSorgher 



10 



Special Police Officers Continued 



Kenneth W. Dunbar 
David C. Egy 
Robert Eklund 
Jeffrey M. Farrell 
Shawn P. Garvey 
Jonathan Gifford 
George W, Hinkley, 
John Holmes 
Samuel Johnston 
William D. Jones 
James T. Kashalena 
George Katapodis 
Leslie Ann Kleczek 
Timothy H# Kleczek 
Thomas M. LaPlante, 
Robert L. Larkin 
Alfred Leverone 
Karen MacGregor 
John L. Mayer 
Robert K. McCarthy 
William Meau 
George P. Michel 
Hugh Mick 
Frank S. Newell, Jr. 



Ill 



Jr. 



Rebel L. Palumbo 
Mario Pederzini 
James Powers 
William R. Reagan 
Walter F. Reynold 
Walter F. 
David Riggs 
Patricia A. Rioux 
Warren L. Robinson 
Joel Rosenfeld 
John Ryan 
Joseph E. Ryan 
Christopher Sheeny 
Carl Sheridan 
George E. Smith, Jr. 
John F. Sullivan 
Herbert D. Talerman 
J. Robert Tosi 
William Triefol 
John E. Varnum, Jr. 
Armando R. Viera 
Thomas Ward 
Thomas Watson 
John W. Wilhelmi 



SPECIAL POLI CE OFFICERS - CORNING GLASS 
Donald J. Bickel John Mortz 

SPECIAL POLICE OFFICER - BEN FRANKLIN SECURITY 
Ronald A. Taddeo 
SPECIAL POLICE OFFICER - ROCKY WOODS 
Stephen E. Bassett 
SPECIAL POLICE OFFICERS - SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 



Allan K. Belcher 
Tassos P. Filledes 
Vincent D. Hallowell 
Frank J. Hoffman 



G. Douglas Ide 
John McGrath 
James E. Morris 
Harold F. Pritoni 



SPECIAL POLICE OFFICERS - MEDFIELD STATE HOSPITAL 



Richard Buckley 
Elwin Graves 
Jay Guglieimi 
Joseph Harkins 



John Rogers 



Valerie Jones 
William J. Marchand , Jr 
Robert McGrath 
Leo J. Prince 



11 



COUNCIL ON AGING 



Priscilla D. Clark 








Edwin C 


Flaherty, 


Re 


signed 




Harry T 


Mitchell 








Barbara 


M. Norcross 






Barbara 


Connors 








John T. 


Hosey * 








Gertrude H. Ehnes, 


Associate 


Member 


Madeleine I. Harding, 


Associate Member 


H. Tracy Mitchell, 


Associate 


Member 



Term Expires 

November 16, 1983 

November 16, 1983 

November 16, 1983 

November 16, 1984 

November 16, 1984 

November 16, 1984 

April 1982 

April 1982 

April 1982 



BOARD OF APPEALS ON ZONING - SUBDIVISION CONTROL 



Charles H. Peck 

Robert F. Sylvia 

Burgess P. Standley 

Ralph C Good, Jr., Associate Member 

Paul B. Rhuda, Associate Member 



1982 
1983 
1984 
1982 
1982 



ARCHITECTURAL BARRIERS COMMITTEE 



George G. Lorantos, Resigned 

Judith A. Lorantos, Resigned 

Frederick A. Rogers, Jr., Resigned 

Frederick P. Baker 

Pauline A. Coulter 

Robert Coulter 

Beverly Hallowell 

William J. Heller 

Dorothy Kane 

Richard Kenney 

Millard F. Owen 

Charles H. Rayner, Jr. 

Christie A. Shoop 

Michael J. Sullivan 



1981 
1981 
1981 
April 1982 
April 1982 
April 1982 
April 1982 
April 1982 
April 1982 
April 1982 
April 1982 
April 1982 
April 1982 
April 



1982 



COUNCIL ON ARTS 



Stephen W. Cook 
Gay D'Amaro 
Wilbur L. Luecke 
Susan A. Parker 
Rosalie Shirley 
Cleda M. Simmons 
Fayre Stephenson 



April 198 

April .198 

April 198 

April 198 

April 198 

April 198 

April 198 



AUDIT COMMITTEE 



Edward F. Barrett, Jr. 

Stephen Buckley, Jr. 

William A. Ha j jar 

Leo F. Kelly, Deceased 

Sandra G. Munsey 

Nancy J. Preston 

Arlene M. Regan 

Michael J. Sullivan 

* Appointed to fill unexpired term 



April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 



1982 
1982 
1982 
1982 
1982 
1982 
1982 
1982 



12 



CENTRAL BUSINESS DISTRICT STUDY COMMITTEE 



R. Edward Beard 
Fred W. Clarridge, Jr. 
Margaret C. Erdlen 
Lorraine G. Holland 
Doris E. Kellar 



Robert A. Kinsman 
David L. Owen 
Thomas V. Sweeney, Jr. 
Dilys Ward 
Roy C. Watson 



CHURCH STUDY ADVISORY COMMITTEE 



Eleanor M. Anes 
Kenneth M. Childs, Jr. 
Diane Bishop-Ellsworth 
Catherine A. Lake 
C. Richard McCullough 



Charles R. Mullen 
Sandra G. Munsey 
Joan M. Snow 
W. David Stephenson 



CHARLES RIVER WATERSHED PROJECT - MANAGEMENT STUDY COMMITTEE 



Term Expires 



Harry A. Kelleher 
CIVIL DEFENSE 



April 1982 



Mario Pederzini, Director 

John E. Varnum, Jr., Deputy Director 

Richard Ostrander, Underwater Rescue and Recovery 

Frederick A. Rogers, Jr., Dispatcher 

William M. Derby, Jr., Chief Radio Operator 

Stephen Wood, Assistant Deputy Chief Radio Operator 

Judith C. Harris, Radio Operator 

Patrick S. Harris, Radio Operator 

George G. Wood, Radio Operator 

Gene L. Piken, Assistant Radio Operator 

David M. Sexton, Sergeant, Rescue Squad & Auxilliary Police 

Ruth A. Gaffey, Shelter Manager 

CIVIL DEFENSE AUXILIARY POLICE OFFICERS 



April 


1982 


April 


1982 


April 


1982 


April 


1982 


April 


1982 


April 


1982 


April 


1982 


April 


1982 


April 


1982 


April 


1982 


April 


1982 


April 


1981 



Mario Pederzini, Deputy Chief 
John E. Varnum, Jr., Captain 
Vincent M. Cellucci, Lieutenant 

Paul Boychuck 
Chester A. Burks 
Ralph Chadsey 
Robert Currie 
Ruth A. Gaffey 
Jonathan Gifford 
Judith C. Harris 
Patrick S. Harris 
James T. Kashalena 
Patricia Knowles 



Bruce Berry, Sergeant 

Albert Brown, Sergeant 

Herbert Talerman, Range Sergeant 

John Mayer 
Gene L. Piken 
Patricia A. Rioux 
Frederick A. Rogers, Jr. 
Stephen P. Saulnier 
John E. Varnum, Sr. 
Armando R. Viera, Jr. 
Constance Waite 
Stephen Warren 
Stephen Wood 



13 



CODIFICATION COMMITTEE 



.Juliana G. Alasso 
Ralph C. Good 
Pauline M. Goucher 
Charles Fuller, Jr , 



Jane P. McCarty 
Nancy J. Preston 
Robert B. Ripley 



COLLECTIVE BARGAINING TEAM 



R. Edward Beard 
Andrew G. Ebert 
Charles Fuller, Jr. 



John C . Krause 
Michael J. Sullivan 



COMMUNITY GARDENS COMMITTEE 



Edward Bishara 
Joan Carmichael 
Margaret P. Hollis 
Raymond 0. Hollis 
Harvey Hoover 
Doris E, Kellar 
William P. Mikelonis 
Roy Owen 
Mario Pederzini 
Michael J, Sullivan 



Term Expires 
1982 
1982 
1981 
1981 
1981 
1981 
1981 
1981 
1981 
1981 



CONSERVATION COMMISSION 



Frederick D. Harrison 

Mario Pederzini 

Richard W. Bryant 

Hanson C. Robbins 

John F, Guthrie, Jr. 

Edmund P. Hammond * 

Peyton C. March, Resigned 

David H. Martin 

John F. Brad street, Associate Member 

Alfonse J. Caruso, Associate Member 

Lee Howell, Associate Member 

Betty Kaerwer, Associate Member 

Robert A. Kinsman, Associate Member 



COMMITTEE TO STUDY DESIGN CONTROLS 



1982 
1982 
1983 
1983 
1984 
1984 
1984 
1984 
1982 
1982 
1982 
1982 
1982 



Ann M. Bray ton 
Daniel V. Fritzs che 
Donald H c Harding 
Thompson S. Lingel 

John H. Shannon 
George M. Graham, Jr , 
William P. Mikelonis 
Paul E. Hinkley 
Donald H. Harding 



Virginia M. Loughnane 
Patrick J. McDonough, Esq. 
Joseph R. Parker, Jr. 
Robert L. Vollmuth 



DEVELOPMENT AND INDUSTRIAL COMMISSION 



1982 
1982 
1982 
1983 
1984 



"Appointed to fill unexpired term 



14 



DRAINAGE STUDY COMMITTEE 



Sarsfield Brennan 
Fred D. Gardner 
Robert F. Kennedy 



Term Expires 

Robert A. Kinsman 
Peyton C. March 
Paul F. Valzania 



EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICES RESPONSE COMMITTEE 



William H. Mann 
Robert E. Meaney, Jr. 
Joseph E. Ryan 
Michael J. Sullivan 



1982 
1982 
1982 
1982 



ENFORCING OFFICER FOR ZONING 



Rebel L. Palumbo 

John P. 0' Toole, Assistant 

Walter H. Tortorici, Assistant 



1982 
1982 
1982 



HAZARDOUS WASTE COORDINATOR 



S. Joseph Mercadante 



1982 



HAZARDOUS WASTE COMMITTEE 



Edith A. Beale 
Edward J. Carreiro 
Lester M. Cohen 
Paul L. Dudash 
Elizabeth J. Ferran 
Walter M. Glaeser 
Robert H. Janoch, Jr 
Francis X. Quinn 
Frederick L. Schultz 



1982 
1982 
1982 
1982 
1982 
1982 
1982 
1982 
1982 



HIGH TENSION LINES STUDY COMMITTEE 



J. Patrick Little 
James R. Smith 



Henry Sunkenberg 
Barry J. Thompson 



HISTORICAL COMMISSION 



Robert A. Dellaselva 

Donald J. MacDonald 

David L. Owen 

Patricia A. Rioux 

Eleanor M. Anes 

Alice M. Crawley, Resigned 

Ann S. Mentzer 

David L. Wilmarth 

Ann M. Brayton, Associate Member 

Laura H. Smith, Associate Member 



June 30, 


1982 


June 30, 


1982 


June 30, 


1982 


April 


1983 


June 30, 


1984 


June 30, 


1984 


June 30, 


1984 


June 30, 


1984 


April 


1982 


June 30, 


1982 



INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT FINANCING AUTHORITY 



Term Expires 



William E. McCarthy, Deceased 
Robert J. McCarthy 
William P. Mikelonis 
Robert J. Larkin 
Anne Lee Howell 
Stephen Buckley, Jr. 



1982 
1982 
1983 
1984 
1985 
1986 



INSURANCE ADVISORY COMMITTEE 



Robert S. Capers, Jr. 
Woolsey S. Conover, Jr, 
Edward J. MacDonald 



1982 
1982 
1982 



LANDFILL SITE SELECTION AND STUDY COMMITTEE 



Thomas A. Caragliano 

Anthony F. Calo 

Douglas A. Campbell 

Kenneth M. Childs, Jr. 

Thomas J. Donovan 

Harry A. Reliefer 

William E. McCarthy, Deceased 



Robert E. Kennedy 
Kenneth P. Feeney 
Elmer 0. Portmann 
Hanson C. Robbins 
George L. Robinson 
Michael J. Sullivan 



MEDFIELD DESIGNEE - MBTA ADVISORY BOARD 



Michael J. Sullivan 



1982 



MEDFIELD DESIGNEE - OUTDOOR ADVERTISING 



Rebel L. Palumbo 



1982 



MEDFIELD TOWN HISTORIAN 



Laura H. Smith 



1982 



METROPOLITAN AREA PLANNING COUNCIL 



Harry A. Kelleher 



April 3, 1983 



MEMORIAL DAY COMMITTEE 



Albert A. Cruickshank 
Richard P. DeSorgher 
Sandra G. Munsey 
Robert J. Larkin 
L. Lee DeSorgher 
Joseph E. Ryan 



William H. Mann 
Rev. Paul E. Nor cross 
Irene L. 0' Toole 
James F. Tubridy 
Gerald L. Underwood 
Arthur P. Walker 



REPRESENTATIVE TO THE NORFOLK COUNTY ADVISORY BOARD 



Richard P. DeSorgher 



September 1982 



16 



MEDFIELD NORFOLK PRISON PROJECT SCREENING COMMITTEE 

Arthur L. Farrar 

REGIONALIZATION COMMITTEE 

Margaret E. Bancroft 
Michael J. Sullivan 

REPRESENTATIVE TO "OUTER 64" MBTA COMMITTEE 

Gregg R. Steamer 

JOINT REGIONAL TRANSPORTATION COMMITTEE 



Thomas J. Donovan 



Sarsfield Brennan 
128 WEST ADVISORY COUNCIL 



Term Expires 
1982 



YOUTH ADVISORY COMMISSION 



Ariadne Allan 

Geoffrey Ball 

Patrick W. Clancy 

Jeanne E. Commane 

Diane Daniels 

Richard P. DeSorgher 

Mary Gillis 

William J. Heller 

Rev. Mrs. Leila B. Holden 

Jean Kraus 

Tandy Mc Clung, Resigned 

Lynne Montanari 

Paul Murley 

Robert E. Naughton 

David Palmer 

Debbi Ross 

Barbara J. Tupper 



1982 
1982 
1982 
1982 
1982 
1982 
1982 
1982 
1982 
1982 
1982 
1982 
1982 
1982 
1982 
1982 
1982 



APPOINTMENTS MADE BY TAX COLLECTOR 



DEPUTY COLLECTORS 



Peter Bartkewici: 
Richard D. Bishop 
Ronald E. Kerr 



Virginia F. Kinter 
Clarissa C. Supko 



APPOINTMENTS MADE BY ASSESSORS 



Stan E. Bergeron, Assistant Assessor 
C.B. Doub, Assistant Assessor 



1982 
1982 



17 



APPOINTMENTS MADE BY FIRE CHIEF 



Walter F. Reynolds, Jr., Deputy Fire Chief 

Ellis N. Allen, Captain 
Clinton M. Clark, Lieutenant 
George DeVenanzi, Lieutenant 
Charles G. Seavey, Lieutenant 

Mario Pederzini, Clerk 

APPOINTMENTS MADE BY 
BOARD OF HEALTH 

ADVISORY COMMITTEE TO THE OUTREACH PROGRAM Term Expires 

Robert Cresto 1982 

William H. Mann 1982 

Marilyn R. Rossier 1982 

Hope M. Wallingford 1982 

Richard H. Whelan 1982 

INSPECTORS OF SANITATION 

William R. Domey John J, Keefe 

BOARD OF HEALTH ADVISORY COMMITTEE 

Jean P. Clark A. Ritchey Stagg, M.D. 

Madeleine I. Harding James D. Sullivan, M.D. 

Nancy C. Kashalena Rev. Robert L. Wood 



APPOINTMENTS MADE BY MODERATOR 

DEPUTY MODERATOR 

Tidal B. Henry 1982 

WARRANT COMMITTEE 

1982 
1982 
1982 
1983 
1983 
, 1-983 

1984 
1984 
1984 



Anthony 


F. 


Calo 


William 


. A. 


Ha j jar 


Richard 


L. 


Middlesworth 


Francis 


J. 


Cusack 


John M. 


Thompson 


Paul G. 


Ml 


irphy 


Andrew 


G. 


Ebert 


Frederick 


Temple 


Ann B. 


Thompson 



PERSONNEL BOARD 



Barbara J. Stevenson 
John C. Krause 
Edward J. Hughes 



November 30, 1982 
November 30, 1983 
November 30, 1984 



SCHOOL PLANNING AND BUILDING COMMITTEE 



Robert S. Capers, Jr. 
David R. Iverson 
Mary Ellen Valzania 



1983 
1984 
1984 



APPOINTMENTS MADE BY 
PLANNING BOARD 



MASTER PLAN IMPLEMENTATION COMMITTEE 



David F. Choate, Resigned 
Loretta Fader* 
Robert M. Strong 
Juliana Alasso 
Kenneth Jenkins 
Virginia M. Loughnane 
John F. McCarthy 
Joseph Codispoti 
Alicen McGowan 
Joseph R. Parker, Jr. 



SIGN ADVISORY BOARD 



Philip Bonanno 

Charles E. Mitchell 

Daniel V. Fritzsche 

Roy C. Watson 

Donald H. Harding 

David F. Choate, III, Resigned 

Helen K. Weinert 



June 


28, 


1982 


June 


28, 


1982 


June 


28, 


1982 


June 


28, 


1982 


June 


28, 


1983 


June 


28, 


1983 


June 


28, 


1983 


June 


28, 


1984 


June 


28, 


1984 


June 


28, 


1984 


January 


15, 


1982 


January 


15, 


1982 


January 


15, 


1983 


January 


15, 


1983 


January 


15, 


1983 


January 


15, 


1984 


January 


15, 


1984 



APPOINTMENTS MADE BY 
TOWN ACCOUNTANT 

Irene L. O'Toole, Assistant Accountant 



* Appointed to fill unexpired term. 



19 



APPOINTMENTS MADE BY TOWN CLERK 

Nancy S. Franke , Assistant Town Clerk 

APPOINTMENTS MADE BY TREASURER 

Term Expires 
Charlotte R. Randolph, Assistant Treasurer, Resigned March, 1981 

APPOINTED BY CHAIRMAN OF SELECTMEN, 

CHAIRMAN OF SCHOOL COMMITTEE AND 

MODERATOR TO REGIONAL VOCATIONAL 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Albert G. Chouinard June 30, 1983 



20 



DEPARTMENTAL 
REPORTS 



FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31. 1981 



21 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 



To the Residents of Medfield: 

The year was one of change for the Town of Medfield and for the Board of 
Selectmen. While the implementation of Chapter 580 of The Acts of 1980, "Proposi- 
tion 2%", dominated town finances, significant progress was made in other areas 
such as library expansion, water supply and conservation and codification of town 
by-laws . 

ORGANIZATION OF THE BOARD 

The membership of the Board of Selectmen changed considerably with the announce- 
ment by Selectman R. Edward Beard that he would not seek re-election to a third 
term arid with the resignation of Chairman William R. Reagan after five years of 
service on the Board. Both of these Selectmen served the residents of Medfield 
with exceptional dedication and concern. In March, Robert J. Larkin was electee 
for a three year term to the position vacated by R. Edward Beard and Kenneth M. 
Childs, Jr. was elected for a one year term to the seat vacated by William R. 
Reagan. On March 31st, the Board reorganized with Richard P. DeSorgher as Chair- 
man, Kenneth M. Childs, Jr. as Clerk and Robert J. Larkin as Third Member. 

Another major change in town government occurred with the passing of William E. 
McCarthy, on May 3rd. Bill who had served the Town of Medfield for thirty-five years 
first as a Selectman and later as Superintendent of Streets, Water and Sewer, of- 
fered a wealth of knowledge of Medfield' s history and a helping hand to countless 
residents and visitors seeking information on Medfield 's past, present, and future. 
Much of what Medfield is today is the result of Bill's foresight and persistence. 

In December, the Board appointed Kenneth P. Feeney to the position of Superin- 
tendent of Streets, Water and Sewer. 

CHAPTER 580 OF THE ACTS OF 1980 

In implementing the revenue reductions mandated by the provisions of Chapter 580 
of The Massachusetts Acts of 1980, "Proposition 2^", the Board of Selectmen worked 
with the various Town Boards, commissions and department heads to reduce local 
budgets and services in a responsible way. The cooperation of Medfield 's officials 
and employees was exemplary, resulting in a productive Town Meeting. 

As a result of Town Meeting action the total amount expended by the town in 
fiscal 1982 was $9,726,984.70 which was $429,718.72 or 4% less than expended in 
fiscal 1981. The fiscal 1982 tax levy of $5,969,514.49 was $690,567.89 or 10% 
lower than the fiscal 1981 tax levy. Town Meeting appropriations decreased 
$509,705.22 or 5% between fiscal 1981 and fiscal 1982 to $9,084,562.78 while State 
,and County Cherry Sheet assessments increased $25,577.64 or 7% to $362,219.42. 
Additional cuts in town services were required to fund these increases in state and 
county assessments. What many people do not realize is that within one month of 
the passage of proposition 2^, the legislature and the Governor enacted legislation 
overridine its provisions to give more money to the MBTA. It is perhaps indicative 

22 




Mario Pederzini Accepts Annual Town Report 1980 (Dedicated to Mr. Pederzini 
from Selectman R. Edward Beard and Selectman Richard P. DeSorgher 




% 




Oath of Office Administered to Selectman Robert J. Larkin, Selectman Kenneth M. 
Chi Ids, Jr. and School Committeeman David Stephenson by Town Clerk Nancy J. Preston 



23 



of Beacon Hill's attitude towards the cities and towns and towards the taxpayers 
that the first override of Proposition 2*2 would be to assist the MBTA at the expense 
of the cities and towns. 

The revenue losses from the property tax and the motor vehicle excise tax were 
$765,167.89 and as a percentage of total town revenues these two sources decreased 
from 68.6% to 63.8%. This loss in revenue for the most part was accomodated by re- 
ducing town appropriations. The remainder of the revenue loss was accomodated by 
increased revenues from other sources. State aid increased $307,099.43 or 16% be- 
tween fiscal 1981 and fiscal 1982 but over a two year period from fiscal 1980 to 
fiscal 1982 state aid only increased $186,291.52 or 9%, averaging an annual increase 
of 4.5% per year, far less than the rate of inflation and far less than the rate of 
increase in state spending. This is because state aid to Medfield actually de- 
creased between fiscal 1980 and fiscal 1981. Next year increases in local user 
charges for water, sewerage treatment, ambulance, liquor licenses, recreation, 
school athletic programs, and school lunches should increase local revenues by about 
$300,000. 

Budget reductions were made throughout the town departments and Medfield 
residents were very understanding of the need to reduce services. Among the reduc- 
tions were: 

. the closing of the Dale Street School and school reorganization; 

. the reduction of operating hours at the landfill and the elimination of one 
position in the budget; 

. the elimination of town funded garbage colleci_ion to save $18,500; 

. the elimination of 4 summer positions in the highway department, and a reduc- 
tion in highway maintenance and equipment replacement programs; 

. the elimination of a work study position and of weekend septic dumping at the 
wastewater treatment plant to cut electrical costs and; 

. the cut in chemical treatment during the winter months; 

the removal of one hundred thirty-one street lights to save $9,000 per year in 
electrical costs; 

. the reduction in library hours and personnel; 

. the elimination of the assistant dog officer position; 

. the reduction in clerical hours at the town house and police station; 

. the reduction in park and recreation programs and the elimination of the rec- 
reation coordinator's position; 

. the reduction in mosquito adulticide aerial spraying; 

. the elimination of two street crossing guards; 

. the elimination of the pavement marking program; 

. the reduction of police cruiser replacements; 

. the reduction in tree planting and brush clearance programs; 

. the reduction in the pension funding program; 

. the reduction in funding for Norfolk Mental Health programs; 

. the reduction in transportation funds for the Council on Aging; 

. the reduction in funding for the Memorial Day parade; 

While some of these budget cuts, such as highway maintenance and police cruiser 
replacement, were one year postponements a large number of cuts such as street 
lightings and garbage collection were intended to be permenant reductions in town 
services directed towards the long-range goal of providing less government to the 
residents of Medfield in order to reduce property taxes. 



24 



The Board of Selectmen from the start were concerned that the first priority in 
reviewing budgets was to assure that adequate public safety and public health 
services were maintained and budget review was done with this in mind. As a result 
the level of police and fire coverage was maintained. The Board also voted to in- 
stitute a hiring freeze on February 10, 1981 which was not lifted until July when 
budgets had been approved and expenditure reductions had been made. Fortunately 
most of the personnel cutbacks were accomplished by attrition which helped to reduce 
unemployment insurance benefit costs to the town. 

As a result of Town Meeting action the tax rate was decreased from $28.30 to 
$24.70 and the town complied with the mandate to reduce the tax levy below 2^% of 
full and fair market valuation. 

NORFOLK COUNTY ADVISORY BOARD 

Section 28 of Chapter 35 of the General Laws provided for the establishment of 
County Advisory Boards consisting of the city manager or mayor of each city, and the 
chairman of the Board of Selectmen or town manager in each town. The Board, after 
reviewing proposed expenditures and holding public hearings, makes recommendations 
to the County Commissioners concerning county expenditures. The County Commissioners 
may accept or reject these recommendations but if the recommendations are rejected, 
the Advisory Board by a 2/3 vote may delete or reduce any line item in the county 
budget. This legislation which became effective July 1, 1981 represented an im- 
portant step in local control over county expenditures. The Norfolk County Advisory 
Board was established during 1981 with Selectman Chairman Richard P. DeSorgher as 
Medfield' s representative. Selectman DeSorgher was designated as chairman of the 
committees to study the Wollaston Golf Course budget and the County Engineering 
Department budget. 

CENTRAL BUSINESS DISTRICT 

The acquisition of the former St. Edward's Church property enabled the much 
needed library expansion to proceed utilizing federal revenue sharing funds. While 
the project has suffered several setbacks, including the unfortunate injury of a 
police officer on the construction site and the bankruptcy of the general contractor, 
the project was about ninety percent complete at year end and when finished, will be 
a decided asset to Medfield center. The Church Study Committee, chaired by Sandra 
G. Munsey, advertised for bids for the reuse of the former St. Edward's Church and 
based upon its recommendations the Board entered into a purchase and sale agreement 
with Robert J. Shannon, a Medford developer, who proposed a business-residential 
condominum to preserve the church structure. 

Another major change in the center was the expansion of Corning Medical 
announced during the summer. Corning will occupy the entire hat factory site and 
renovations to the North Street property we're well under way during the fall. The 
decision by Corning Medical to expand in Medfield will assure the continued re- 
vitalization of the central business district. 

The second annual Discover Medfield Day in September, the Christmas parade and 
the Town House planting and decorations, all added a personal touch to the downtown 
revitalization Program. 

MEDFIELD STATE HOSPITAL 



The rezoning of the Medfield State Hospital site for industrial and agricultural 

25 



use was voted by the Town Meeting, but the State had still not made a decision on 
the future of the hospital facility. At the 56-acre Hospital Road site the Town 
with the assistance of the SeaBees, U.S. Navy Construction Battalion Center, Davis- 
ville, R.I., began construction of two ballfields. The fields were designed by the 
staff of the Norfolk County engineering department under the direction of County 
Engineer, Alvah H. Downes. 

TELEPHONE SERVICE 

In March, the Board of Selectmen voted to petition the Department of Public 
Utilities to conduct an investigation of telephone service in the town of Medfield. 
DPU Commissioner George R. Sprague, Richard A. Galante, Director of Telecommunica- 
tions, and representatives of New England Telephone met with the Board. It was 
agreed that the DPU would initiate an investigation. Several meetings were held 
during the year with representatives of the telephone company and the DPU. The 
telephone company after its own investigations submitted a report to the Department 
of Public Utilities in which it was stated that they would install a new central 
office telephone system in Medfield during 1984. At the conclusion of 1981, the 
Board was still trying to resolve reports of continued poor service received from 
various residences and business establishments. 

NEW COMMITTEES 

A Hazardous Waste Committee was appointed to monitor hazardous waste generation 
and disposal in Medfield and Joseph F. Mercadante was appointed Hazardous Waste 
Coordinator. 

At the request of residents of the High Street Gary Drive area, a High Tension 
Line Study Committee was appointed to investigate the 345KV transmission line pro- 
posed for construction by Boston Edison. 

The Board of Selectmen also voted to instruct the Town Counsel to petition the 
Department of Public Utilities as an intervener for the purpose of determining 
whether the line should be constructed underground. 

CIVIC EVENTS 



In January the Board participated in a flag raising ceremony at the Town House 
to celebrate the safe return of the American hostages from Iran. 

The Memorial Day observance in May was highlighted by a parade which included 
the Combat Support Battalion Unit from Fort Devens. 

ACTIVITY AT THE STATE LEVEL 

The entire Board attended the Annual Meeting of the Massachusetts Municipal 
Association in November at which time the Massachusetts Selectmen's Association 
Annual Town Meeting was held . The warrant for this meeting included an article 
proposed by the Medfield Board to sponsor legislation rescinding Section 8 of 
Chapter No. 269 of the General Laws, which holds cities and towns liable for 
damage to private property by mob action. It was unanimously voted to support this 
legislation which was filed at the Board's request by Representative Andrew S. 
Natsios. 

At the Board's request, Senator David H. Locke filed legislation which would 

26 





-Mr 




f 




/ 



f mz 




Cabinet in Memory of Marie Burke Accepted by Selectmen with Representatives of 
Her Family and the Medfield Home Company 



I' J 



change the current statutes so that no city or town would be required to revalue its 
real estate more than once every five years. 

TOWN AUDIT 

An audit of town finances was conducted by the accounting firm of Feeley & 
Driscoll under the direction of the Audit Committee. This was the third private 
audit of town finances since this committee was established and much of the credit 
for the successful operation of this committee was due to the work of Chairman Leo 
F. Kelly. 

FORMER EMPLOYEES HONORED 

Two former employees were honored during the year. The members of the Medfield 
Fire Department paid tribute to former Fire Chief Kenneth R. (Scratch) Clark, who 
passed away on February 24, 1981. Marie M. Burke, former Assistant Town Clerk, was 
commemorated by the Medfield Home Committee at a Town House ceremony dedicating a 
display cabinet in her memory. The ceremony was attended by many family members 
and close friends. 

In May the Assistant Treasurer, Charlotte Randolph, retired after 20 years of 
service to the town. She was instrumental in setting up the town's first computer 
system and in implementing significant improvements in the management of town debt 
and investments. She was honored at a festive retirement party. 

Laura Huntington Smith was designated the first Medfield Town Historian by vote 
of the Board on December 15 in recognition of her outstanding contribution to the 
preservation of town records and historical resources. 

The Board asked the Historical Society to take custody of the Boston Post Cane, 
although ownership will be retained by the Town. The Historical Society also 
assumed responsibility for utility costs of the Historical Society facilities on 
Pleasant Street. 

IMPROVED COMMUNICATION WITH LOCAL BUSINESSMEN 



At the suggestion of Chairman DeSorgher , the Board initiated a series of visits 
to local businesses to determine how the town might better assist local firms in 
expanding or in dealing with town government. 

ACTIVITY OF OTHER BOARDS, COMMISSIONS AND COMMITTEES 

The numerous Town Boards, Commissions and Committees continued their dedicated 
work on behalf of the Town and a record of their achievements can be found in the 
various departmental reports. The individuals serving on these Boards, and 
Commissions and Committees during 1981 deserve a special note of appreciation for 
their cooperation during a most trying year. Without their help, the implementation 
of Proposition 2h would have been impossible. The residents of Medfield have been 
well served. 

Respectfully submitted, 

RickcVid P. VoSon.gh.tn., Chairman 
KmneXh. M. Child&, Jn.., clerk 
RobeAt J. Lankln 



28 



STREETS, WATER & SEWER DEPARTMENTS 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Med field : 

Herewith is respectfully submitted my Annual Report for the year ending 
December 31, 1981. 

The members of the Street, Water and Sewer Departments join me in paying 
tribute to the memory of William E. McCarthy, who served the Town for 25 
years, and as Superintendent of these departments for 12 years. The Town 
suffered a great loss and the Street, Water and Sewer Department employees a 
great leader, as well as a good friend. 

STREET DEPARTMENT . 

Resurfacing ; Proposition 2h. deleted the bulk of this program in 1981, 
but we hope to continue a successful program in 1982 by returning this pro- 
gram to its original strength. 

Drainage ; This program was also deleted from the 1981 budget but, hope- 
fully, will be reinstated in 1982. 

Snow ; Total amount of snow accumulated in 1981 was 34 inches. The 
largest storm was only 6". This is short of the average winter accumulation 
for Massachusetts. A typical winter would be closer to 60". There were 29 
call outs in 1981 for various snow and ice storms. Due to the mild winter 
we returned $19,726 to Free Cash. 

Salting Roads ; This is absolutely kept to a minimum and is strictly 
enforced for various health and overall cost reasons. Salting is restricted 
to main roads, hills and intersections. 

Community Garden Plots ; The preparation of the Community Garden Plots, 
situated beside the Town Garage, is done by our department. Because of the 
demand, sixteen additional plots were added last year, making a total of 
sixty-six plots. 

Softball Fields ; The groundbreaking and landclearing for the softball 
fields located across from the Medfield State Hospital were initiated last 
year with the considerable assistance of the U. S. N. R. Seabees. It is 
hoped the work will continue this year and the project will be completed. 

LANDFILL . The first: half of Phase I in the Landfill will be finished 
early in 1982. The second half of Phase I has been accepted by the State 
and will be started very soon. The Landfill site is tested for impurities 
in its leachate four times a year and has been within State requirements 
on all occasions. The cover material for the Landfill is presently being 
partially hauled by the Highway Department, at a savings to the Town. Hope- 
fully we will increase this savings in 1982. 



29 



LANDFILL RECYCLING INCOME 1/81 - 1/82 

FEES WASTE OIL SCRAP GLASS MISC. TOTAL 



$538.94 $796.50 $1,550. $34.50 $63.50 $406. $3,389.44 

The above total reflects a decrease from last year's total receipts of 
$4,600.29 because of the price of paper dropping from $30. per ton to $2. per 
ton and the fact that glass is no longer picked up. 

SEWER . Street sewers are checked periodically for blockage and ground- 
water infiltration. This is an ongoing program to keep the efficiency of the 
system at a maximum. 

The Treatment Plant treated 108,617,000 gallons of sewage in 1981 at 99% 
removal of impurities. 

The new Chlorine Discharge Permit allows a 40% savings in chlorine costs. 

The Operators conducted Sodium Aluminate Dilution tests resulting in a 
30% reduction in chemical costs to the taxpayers in fiscal 1982-83. 

The Town signed a two-year contract with the Town of Dover for treating 
Dover septage. This will help add revenue to the Sewer Department. 

WATER . The water tower and Well No. 5 site preparation has begun. 

The water meter replacement program is 69% complete. This program keeps 
an accurate record of water revenues. 

The leak detection program has reduced the unaccounted for water by 
approximately 50%. 

In the spring the annual flushing program was completed, which assures 
cleaner water to water takers. 

SALT CONTENT . The State allows 20 milligrams per liter and in 1981 the 
yearly average was 17 mg per liter. This is considered by the various 
drinking water agencies to be of finest quality. 

We started running the sprinkler system into the Hospital Ballfields. 
This should be completed in 1982. 

In conclusion, appreciation is expressed to Patricia Iatolla-Walsh, 
Gertrude Simpson and Nancy Franke, secretaries whose work contributes 
greatly to the successful operation of the several departments. 

Robert Kennedy, Street Department Foreman; Charles Evans, Water and 
Sewer Foreman and Peter Iafolla, Chief Operator of the Treatment Plant, and 
all the men of the various departments are commended for their excellent 
contribution to the public service of the Town. 

Respectfully submitted, 

KoymoXh P. Feenet/, Superintendent 

STREETS, WATER AND SEWER 



30 




Kenneth P. Feeney Appointed Superintendent of Streets, Water & Sewer 
1. to r. Selectman Kenneth M. Childs, Jr., Selectman Richard P. DeSorgher, 
Superintendent Feeney, Selectman Robert J. Larkin 




Foreman Robert Kennedy Commended 




Foreman Charles Evans Commended 
31 



THE FIRE DEPARTMENT 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

I hereby submit my eleventh Annual Report as chief for the period ending 
December 31, 1981. 

This year showed a slight increase in calls from the residents for emer- 
gency and non-emergency situations. 

The schools, state hospital, nursing home, and businesses were inspected 
periodically throughout the year. 

All department equipment is in good working condition. 

I would like to inform all residents of the law pertaining to smoke de- 
tectors in the home. At the town meeting in April, a by-law was passed that 
requires smoke detectors in all residential buildings. This law goes into 
effect one year from the time of approval. Massachusetts General Laws 
Chapter 148, Section 26F also in effect mandates that on all resales or 
transfers of property, an inspection of the smoke detectors must be made and 
a certificate issued by the Fire Department. 

All personnel have received monthly training on the equipment and the 
many phases of f iref ighting. 

In February we were saddened by the death of retired Fire Chief Kenneth 
R. Clark. Chief Clark started with the department in 1921 and served as its 
chief from 1961 to 1964. He was a dedicated firefighter and chief and the 
fire service as well as the men who served with him miss him deeply. 

I would like to take this opportunity to thank the Police Department, 
the Building, Gas, and Electrical Inspectors as well as the staff at the 
Town Hall for the assistance that they have given me throughout the past 
year. I would also like to express my appreciation to the officers and men 
of the department for the exceptional job that they have done this year in 
protecting the lives and property of the citizens of Medfield. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Joseph E. Ryan 
FIRE CHIEF 



32 



SERVICES RENDERED FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1981 

Buildings 12 

Brush & Grass 112 

Automobiles 10 

Rubbish 8 

Gasoline Washdowns 9 

Outdoor Cooking Permits 2 

Outdoor Burning Permits 291 

Duplicating Fluid Permits 5 

Station Duty 

Landfill 1 

Blasting Permits 12 

Inspections 87 

Propane Gas Permits 5 

Model Rocket Permits 12 

Oil or Gas Burners 4 

Mutual Aid 11 

Outside Assistance 3 

Accidental Alarms< 27 

Woodburning Stove Inspections 92 

Smokeless Powder Permits 4 

Bonfire Permits 1 

Lockouts 3 

Water Problems 12 

Bomb Scares 1 

Pumping Cellars 3 

Box Alarms 163 

Still Alarms 226 

False Alarms 15 

Highway Accidents 10 

Electrical 22 

Investigations 79 

Oil Storage Permits 31 

Rescues 6 

Ovens 15 

Chimneys 11 

Details 5 

Black Powder Permits 1 

Searches 1 

Home Fire Alarm Inspections 55 

Fire Marshal Reports 19 

Motor Oil Storage Permits 1 



33 



THE POLICE DEPARTMENT 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

I hereoy submit my Annual Report for the year ending December 31, 1981. 

PERSONNEL : 

There were no changes in the roster of the regular Officers during this 
year. However, Officer Patrick J. Caulfield was injured in the line of duty 
while investigating a possible break-in in the new library addition. Officer 
Caulfield fell into an open area of the construction during the night of 
July 14, 1981 and has been unable to return to duty since then. 

In March, Carol Ann Palmieri of Walpole was hired as a Police Intern 
through the Criminal Justice Program at Massachusetts Bay Community College. 
Paul Boychuk and Christopher Sheehy have continued working as Police Interns 
while attending Northeastern University on the work-study program. John 
tfilhelmi filled in as Intern when needed. 

Patricia Rio^x began working as a Police Intern in January since, at 
that time, no personnel were available through the college programs. Mrs. 
Rioux became temporary Dispatcher in May to replace Leslie Kleczek who took 
a maternity leave of absence. Patricia Rioux was appointed permanent Dis- 
patcher in August. Since Mrs. Kleczek' s return, the 24 hour-a-day duties of 
the Dispatcher are covered by two Permanent Desk Officers and three Interns. 

Suzanne Bryce, our full-time Secretary, retired in May, and was replaced 
by Jean Raff in. However, due to budgetary limitations in fiscal 1982, the 
hours of Police Secretary were decreased to twenty per week. Some of the 
Secretarial duties are now performed by the Dispatchers, and some, notably 
record-keeping, are not being completed. Much of the Secretary's time is 
consumed by the Ambulance billing, especially insofar as methods for filing 
claims with Blue Cross, Medicare and Medicaid. 

EQUIPMENT : 

Again, because of budget reductions, we were unable to receive any new 
cruisers in July as had been planned. Past experience has shown me that we 
should replace cruisers yearly, or when the mileage reaches 60,000-7 0,000 
for the most economical use of them. In November, with a transfer of funds 
from the Warrant Committee, we purchased a 1981 Chevrolet demonstrator to 
replace the 1978 Ford Fairmont. The Fairmont had 94,145 miles, and needed 
several major repairs. The new car is medium sized and cost $7,100 with 
trade-in, representing a savings of $2,000 or more. We now have three 1980 
Ford LTDs, one 1981 Chevrolet Malibu, and one 1980 Ford LTD. The first four 
vehicles are used as our patrol cars, and the Ford LTD is used by the 
Detective. I am requesting funds to replace two 1980 Fords in 1982. Our 
repair expenses were much higher in 1981 than had been budgeted. Contributing 
to the total were repairs to a front end (caused by an accident), tires, 
electrical problems, and rear end. 

34 



The Criminal Justice Information System (CJIS), which has been in the 
planning stage for several years, did not make much headway in 1981. The new 
computer is in operation, but no units have been installed in Police Stations. 
The original plans called for the System to be operative by 1980. 

Our radio communication system consists of the console (at the Dispatch- 
er's desk), a base station, mobile and portable units. On the whole, ser- 
vice in 1981 has been good, with no major repairs necessary in spite of the 
fact that the base station is ten years old. The mobile radios were pur- 
chased in 1965, 1971, 1975, 1978 and 1979. Service life for base stations is 
generally expected to be 10 years, with five to seven years life expectancy 
for mobile radios. We do expect the necessity of more frequent repairs in 
the future. We also expect that the repairs will be more costly due to the 
age of some of the units. The portable radios now in use were all purchased 
within the past three years. Service life is expected to be five to seven 
years. 

In December, the generator ceased functioning and had to be removed to 
Boston for repairs. Until it is returned, we are without emergency power in 
the event of an electrical failure. Estimated cost of repair is $1,000. 

Electricity continues to be the largest expenditure in the building 
operation. The fuel adjustment costs greatly increase the amount spent on 
electricity. 

1981 also saw a great many repairs needed to the traffic signals, 
especially those at: Main and North Streets; Spring and Main Streets; North 
Meadows Rd. and Dale Street; and North Meadows Rd. and West Street. The 
amount of $1,000. had been budgeted for traffic light repairs, but by June 
$3,000. had already been expended. 

CRIMINAL ACTIVITY: 



During 1981 the crime rate remained approximately the same as the prev- 
ious year. Larcenies, housebreaks and vandalism occurred with about the same 
frequency as in 1980. 

Violent crimes are a source of great concern to Police Departments in 
every municipality where budget cuts have led to reductions in personnel. 
In 1981, Medfield had three robberies and two kidnappings. Neighboring towns 
experienced the same type of crimes. Because of a minimal number of person- 
nel at any given time, we frequently respond to calls from other towns. This 
aid is mutually extended when we are in need of assistance. In August, a 
Holliston Police Officer was killed in the line of duty. Assisting in the 
manhunt were Officers Anthony A. Bertone, Robert W. Brady, Robert E. Naugh- 
ton, Robert D. Roy and myself. 

Officer Raymond J. Wheeler, with his dog, Jerry, responded to requests 
from other towns on several occasions to search for wanted persons. Jerry 
also successfully assisted in the investigations of several housebreaks in 
Town. 

AUXILIARY POLICE : 

Mario Pederzini, Vincent Cellucci, and the entire Auxiliary Police Force 
were very helpful throughout the year. Their services were utilized in 
several ways, including the direction of traffic for three road races, two 



35 



parades, and the patrolling of the Town on the Fourth of July and Hallowe'en. 
Most Importantly, at the time of the severe snowstorm in early December, 
several Auxiliary Officers responded with snowmobiles and other vehicles 
which were better able to traverse the roads of the Town than were the 
cruisers. Special appreciation is extended to those Officers for that ser- 
vice. 

I extend my gratitude to all Town Departments for their cooperation, and 
the Town Hall personnel for their able assistance throughout the year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

WWLum H. Mann 
POLICE CHIEF 

STATISTICS FOR THE YEAR 1981 ARE AS FOLLOWS : 

Accidents Reported 289 

Personal Injuries 69 

Fatalities 1 

Hit & Run 45 

Pedestrians 4 

Bicycles 11 

Ambulance Trips 306 

Arrests 109 

Armed Robbery 1 

Arson 10 

Assistance to: 

Other Departments 250 

Motorists and Stranded Persons 263 

General 831 
Automobiles: 

Reported Stolen 17 

Stolen Vehicles Recovered 15 

Citations Issued 289 

Bomb Scares 1 

Breaking and Entering 77 

Attempted 17 

Burglar Alarms Answered 710 

Civil Matters and Family Problems 81 

Closed Homes Checked 170 

Court Attendance 189 

Disturbances 24 

Emergency Calls 233 

Fires Responded to by Police 108 

Doors Found Unlocked or Open 109 

Windows Found Unlocked or Open 10 

Persons Held in Protective Custody 33 

Funeral Escorts 28 

Investigations of Miscellaneous Complaints 1681 

Accostings 4 
Larceny: 

Under $50.00 100 

Over $50.00 142 

Bicycles 42 

Motor Vehicles 17 

Shoplifting 3 

Attempted Larceny 9 

36 



Lost Children Reported 




13 




Lost Children Found by Police 




8 




Malicious Destruction of Property 




279 




Mischievous Acts 




221 




Missing Patients from State Hospital 




126 




Missing Patients returned by Police 




23 




Missing Persons Reported 




32 




Missing Persons Located by Police 




5 




Messages Delivered 




36 




Permits Issued: 








Gunsmith 




1 




Ammunition Dealer 




3 




Firearms Dealer 




1 




Firearms ID Cards 




78 




Pistol Permits 




59 




Bicycle Registrations 




127 




Stolen Bicycles Recovered 




22 




Power Failures 




21 




Prowlers 




36 




Robberies 




3 




Sudden Deaths Investigated 




7 




Summonses Served 




88 




Suspicious Cars 




224 




Suspicious Persons 




153 




Suspicious Phone Calls 




70 




Injured Adults 




17 




Injured Children 




11 




Assaults 




21 




Wires Down 




13 




False Alarms 




9 




Kidnapping 




2 




Attempted Suicide 




1 




Circulation of Obscene Materials 




3 




Commitments 




4 




Rape 




1 




Restitution to Victims $7,150.00 






DETECTIVE INVESTIGATIONS 








CASES 


CASES 




INVESTIGATED 


SOLVED 


Armed Robbery 


2 




2 


Unarmed Robbery 


1 




1 


Arson 


4 




1 


Breaking and Entering: 








Homes 


42 




20 


Schools 


4 






Businesses 


6 




1 


Attempted Breaking and Entering 


5 




3 


Sex Offenses: 








Distribution of Obscene Materials 


3 






Exposings 


12 




9 


Accostings 


3 




2 


Rape 


1 




1 


Missing Persons 


2 




1 


False Report of Crimes 


2 




2 


Stolen Motor Vehicles 


3 




3 


Malicious Destruction of Property 


38 




33 



37 



Threats 5 3 

Harrassing Telephone Calls 2 

Suspicious Persons or Activities 13 11 

Fireworks Violations 2 2 

Larceny 41 23 

Attempted Larceny 2 2 

Fraudulent Checks 18 15 

Hit and Run 4 1 

Bomb Threats 1 1 

Liquor Violations 3 3 

Narcotics Violations 10 4 

Firearm Violations 2 1 

Stolen Property Returned to Owners 8 

Assistance to Other Departments 45 

Assistance to Residents 19 

Assistance to Businesses 8 

Background Investigations 2 

Cruiser Left Town 96 

POLICE AMBULANCE 

The mechanical performance of the ambulance has been very good. No ma- 
jor repairs have been required, and replacing two batteries solved some elec- 
trical difficulties. Officer Robert E. Meaney oversees the maintenance of 
the vehicle and equipment. 

We now have a roster of twenty Emergency Medical Technicians, including 
two who are currently inactive. The daytime coverage, particularly on week- 
days, consists mainly of women, due to the working hours of the male EMTs. 
We are very fortunate to have this coverage. During the summer months, 
several EMTs went on vacation and were unavailable for duty. We are very 
grateful to Ann and Andrew Thompson who were on call almost daily. Gratitude 
is extended to all the volunteers who perform this vital service, as well as 
attend training sessions. 

Officer Meaney conducts in-service training monthly for all EMTs. New 
regulations require that all EMTs must be certified by the state Office of 
Emergency Services. Each EMT must complete CPR training each year; attend 
a 21-hour Department of Transportation refresher course; and attend 48 hours 
of approved training every 2 years in order to be recertified. 

The following people were actively available for EMT duty in 1981: 

Elaine Boudette, Robert Currie, Ruth Gaffey, Jonathan Gifford, Mary 
Gifford, Jude Hinkley, Glenn Jackson, Joan Kiessling, William Mann, Robert 
McCarthy, Robert Meaney, Jr., Nancy Preston, Patricia Rioux, Diane Schulz, 
John Sullivan, Ann Thompson, Andrew Thompson, Deirdre Owen. 

An EMT course was not conducted this year because of insufficient funds, 
difficulty in location of training, and budgetary problems. 

The fee for the use of the ambulance was raised to $90.00 per trip in 
order to make the ambulance self-supporting. 

The fee for recertif ication and relicensing of the ambulance is now 
$135.00, renewable every two years. Our ambulance will be reinspected in 
April* 1982. 



38 



Once again we received financial assistance from the community enabling 
us to stock the ambulance with needed medical items. We are still using a 
mannequin for training that was supplied by the Jaycee women of Medfield a 
few years ago, and the First Aid Kits supplied by the New N' Town Club are 
still in service. 

In 1981, we received a grant from Corning that supplied us with a modern 
spineboard, short board, set of splints, jump kits, and an electronic blood 
pressure monitor. These items are used quite often and increase the speed 
and efficiency with which injured persons are transported to the hospital. 

We are all most appreciative to Corning for their continuing generosity, 
and also to the EMTs who helped to make the grant possible. 

There were 306 ambulance trips in 1981. Additionally, we responded to 
Walpole once and Dover twice on mutual aid. We received mutual aid from 
Millis seven times and Walpole once. Primary destinations were: Leonard 
Morse Hospital - 136; Norwood Hospital - 59; Glover Memorial Hospital - 40; 
and Framingham Union - 19. 




Our Civil Defense Volunteers in Acti 



39 



THE CIVIL DEFENSE 



To the Honorable Beard of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Civil Defense Department has had its responsibilities increased during 
the past year to assist when needed in emergencies such as fire, flood, torna- 
does, hurricanes, blizzards, power outages and nuclear waste spills, it i s now 
under the supervision of FEMA (Federal Emergency Management Agency) . We have 
attended seminars and meetings to hear more of the new plans and to find out 
about the State's Relocation Plan which has stirred up some controversy. 

Our unit, including Auxiliary Police and Radio operators, has been active 
on numerous occasions. We have assisted at parades and other functions with 
traffic control and supervision of crowds. On the 5th, and 6th of December, 
when an emergency was declared due to road conditions during our first big 
snowstorm, members of the Auxiliary were called with our four-wheel drive 
vehicles to assist the regular police in helping stranded motorists, transfers 
for nurses to the hospital and other calls too numerous to mention. 

I would like to express my sincere thanks to the Board of Selectmen for 
their cooperation during the year, to Michael Sullivan and his staff at the 
Town Hall for their help on numerous occasions, to Police Chief William Mann 
for his help and guidance in matters pertaining to police work and to Fire 
Chief Joseph Ryan for sharing some of his quarters under the fire station for 
our EOC room. 

To the members of the CD unit including Auxiliary Police and Radio 
Operators, my deep and sincere thanks for the cooperation they have extended 
by giving so freely of their time and talents whenever called upon. Without 
these dedicated persons, all that has been accomplished would not have been 
possible. 

Respectfully, 

MojlIo VoAinzLvil 

Civil Defense Director 



40 



ANIMAL CONTROL OFFICER 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

I hereby submit my report as Animal Control Officer for the year ending 
December 31, 1981. 

Number of complaints or requests for assistance 

responded to by van or by phone 1925 

Regular citations issued 107 

Court hearings for failure to license 32 

Dogs registered in 1981 1184 

Kennels registered in 1981 27 

Amount of money assessed in regular citation fines $ 390 

Amount of money paid for non licensing fines $ 900 

Found and placed in new homes - 5 baby rabbits, 27 cats, 19 dogs. Twenty- 
two dogs were kenneled in Medfield for over a period of 10 days and placed up 
for adoption. Nineteen were adopted, 2 are still awaiting adoption and 1 dog 
was deemed unadoptable and placed in a special training program for problem 
dogs and will be evaluated at a later date for adoption. 

All dogs and most cats were vet checked before going to new homes. All 
money paid to me by the State for the keeping of stray dogs ($20 per dog) was 
used to pay medical bills, food and kennel supplies for the animals. The 
Medfield Humane Society donated money and food to help us in our struggle to 
save as many animals as possible. 

The Humane Society also donated a run for the stray dogs. Our kennel now 
consists of two town purchased dog houses and a sixteen foot run. We have a 
large crate in the basement of the police station which can be used in an 
emergency. Almost all stray dogs stay on my property and most stray cats are 
placed in homes around town until they are adopted. 

During the year 1981, Animal Control also took care of the following: 

The burial of thirteen dogs hit by cars. 
The burial of thirty cats hit by cars. 

One dog carcass was pulled from the river and buried in the marshes. 
Fifty-eight dogs were housed at the kennel because of lack of identifi- 
cation. 

All owners were given twenty-four hours to license their dogs. 
Ten dogs were returned to other towns. 

Seventeen horses were rounded up and returned to their owners. 
Nineteen cattle were returned to their barns. 

Four deer were killed; two by car and one by a dog pack. The fourth 
reason was never determined. Natural resources responded in all cases. 
Five illegal traps were discovered and the owner was fined and made to 
pay the bills for an injured cat caught in a trap. 

Four cases of cruelty were reported to the S.P.C.A., resulting in the 
relocation of two of these animals. 



41 



Ten skunks and raccoons were shot due to distemper. 
Four raccoons were removed from dumpsters and set free. 
One dog and one duck were removed from sewers. 
Many rodents and birds were rescued or put down. 

I gave four lectures to school children on the care of animals. 
I attended a three day seminar at Macomber Farm on the care of and 
disease recognition of wild life, first aid and animal control in 
general. 

I wish to thank the good people of Medfield who have helped us cope with 
the lack of funds, due to proposition 2^, and with the task of placing the 
strays. 

I also wish to thank the Medfield Suburban Press for the space it pro- 
vides me each week to advertise our animal news. The paper is responsible 
for the adoption of our strays and the education of our citizens to the needs 
of and the laws regarding animals. My job as Animal Control Officer would be 
made much more difficult and heartbreaking without the wonderful assistance 
of this newspaper and I am truly grateful for all it has done for me. 

Medfield continues to have one of the finest humane reputations in the 
State and I am proud to represent the town, its people and its animals. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Kcuizn Mac Gnomon. 
Animal Control Officer 



42 



THE ANIMAL INSPECTOR 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and the Residents of Medfield: 

I hereby submit my report as Animal Inspector for the year ending December 
31, 1981. 

One cat and twenty-two dogs were reported as having bitten and/or 
scratched. These animals were subsequently quarantined for a period of ten 
days. None of these animals showed evidence of Rabies. In all cases, both 
the Medfield Board of Health and the Department of Agriculture - Animal Div- 
ision of Massachusetts were notified. 

All barns and shelters for horses, cattle, sheep, swine, goats, chickens, 
ducks and geese were examined for cleanliness, sufficient water, air flow and 
light. All met with the requirements set forth by the Board of Health. All 
animals were examined and found free of disease and parasite infestation. All 
horses and ponies were required to be immunized against Encephalitis and proof 
of such immunization was furnished by each owner. 

For the annual inspection a total of 75 horses, 11 ponies, 8 cows, 1 bull, 
6 steer, 7 goats, 20 sheep and two swine were inspected. A total of 8 permits 
were applied for and granted for the keeping of chickens and wildfowl. The 
number of these birds fluctuates monthly according to predator kill and/or 
human consumption. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Kcvizn Mac Gfizgon. 
Animal Inspector 

WUbuA M. SoJXvi, P.l/.M. 
Assistant Animal Inspector 



43 



THE WATER AND SEWERAGE BOARD 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and the Residents of Medfield: 



WATER DEPARTMENT 






1980 
Actual 




1981 
Actual 




1982 

Estimate 


Total Services 
Added Services 
Thousand Gallons 
Thousand Gallons 


Used 
Sold 




2697 

43 

394,740 

250,191 




2735 

38 

353,203 

347,549 




2750 

35 

400,000 

367,000 


Water Revenue Rec 
Water Rates 
Water Services 


eived 


$ 


151,541 
2,796 


$ 


227,824 
2,784 


$ 


367,000 
2,000 


Expenses 
Debt Services 




$ 


168,374 



$ 


184,205 



$ 


179,945 



SEWER DEPARTMENT 
















Total Units 
Added Units 
Sewer Use Charge 
Sewer Installation 
Sewer Installers Fee 
Septic Waste Disposal 


$ 

$ 

$ 

Fee$ 


58^. 

76 

48,964 

2,907 

200 

2,262 


$ 
$ 
$ 
$ 


625 
25 

94,910 
700 
250 

12,012 


$ 
$ 
$ 
$ 


625 



100,000 



250 

20,000 


Expenses 




$ 


119,932 


$ 


124,106 


$ 


131,095 



iJATER 

The long awaited Superior Court decision concerning the location of the 
future Mt. Nebo standpipe has reaffirmed the position of the town. The 
final approval now received, the Board is free to expedite the engineering 
design and final construction. The construction should start in mid 1982 
and carry through to a 1983 completion. 

The contract and engineering design has been completed on the construc- 
tion of Well 5. Well 5 is to be located in the south end of town, ad- 
jacent to Wells 3 and 4. Bids should be received by early 1982 with a com- 
pletion date of late 1982. The completion of the new well, standpipe and 
appurtenant piping will bring the town back in line with the Master Plan es- 
tablished in 1977. 

The continuation of the meter replacement program and the town wide 
leak detection program has noticeably reduced the unaccounted for water 
figures. The Board plans to continue its meter replacement until 100% re- 
placement is achieved. 

The town has corresponded with the State concerning its interest in the 
acquisition of the State Hospital standpipe and well fields. 



44 



The undetermined future of the State Hospital has precipitated our con- 
cern that the town might lose a valuable resource for future water and hy- 
draulic balance with the standpipe. 

The Board reluctantly voted to place into effect che town's first in- 
crease on its water rates since 1966. The rate has gone from $.60 per 1,000 
gallon to $1.00 per 1,000 gallons. Increases in energy and chemical costs 
could no longer be absorbed by the old rate. 

SEWER 



The Board has continued and finalized an agreement with the Town of Dover 
to accept septage from Dover to our Wastewater Treatment Plant. In doing 
this, a portion of our operations and maintenance costs can be recovered 
with no detrimental effects to the plant or Medfield residents. 

Continuation of the sewer system has taken place with the development of 
Cedar Acres, Ard Righ Estates and Westbridge Estates. 

This. year the town has suffered an irretrievable loss with the death of 
its Superintendent for 25 years, William E. McCarthy. Billy was well known 
for his attitude and professional ability. He was our town historian and 
friend. His dedication and insight will be greatly missed. 

Ken Feeney, operator in charge of the town's Wastewater Treatment Plant 
has been appointed the new Superintendent of Streets, Water and Sewer by the 
Board of Selectmen after reviewing many applicants. Congratulations to 
Ken. The Board is looking forward to working with him as in the past. 

We also would like to thank the personnel of the Sewer Department, the 
new operator in charge Peter Iafolla, Robert LaPlante and to welcome the 
new operator Nancy McSweeny, the personnel of the Water Department, Charles 
H. Evans, Foreman, Thomas LaPlante, James Gorman, and Paul Vezina for their 
professionalism and dedication to their jobs. The Board again appreciates 
the valuable assistance of its Administrative Secretary, Mrs. Simpson, 
Executive Secretary, Michael J. Sullivan and part time Secretary, Sally 
Carvalho for their work to make our job much easier. 

Respectfully submitted, 

John A. Ro.6£, Jfl. , Chairman 

John V. \tiWUami> 

Leland V. Bzvqaolqz 

HdAAy M2AA0U), Associate Member 



45 



TREE AND INSECT 
PEST CONTROL DEPARTMENT 



To the. Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Tree Department carried on its usual operations of raising limbs along road- 
sides that might interfere with visibility of cars, roadsides and traffic at inter- 
sections. There was considerable pruning of deadwood from trees overhanging the 
traveled way. The usual annual clearance of tree growth from the fire alarm wires 
was completed. Limbs were raised over sidewalks so as not to interfere with 
pedestrians. 

Seventeen dead or dying trees were removed to prevent possible damage to ve- 
hicles or pedestrians by falling limbs. 

We have been injecting some of our more important Elms for insect and disease 
control instead of spraying. This method of control for the Elm Bark and the Elm 
Leaf Beetles is proving quite successful. We also inject a fungicide into the trunk 
at the same time to help to control the Dutch Elm Disease. 

The Gypsy Moth aerial spray of the year ending June 30, 1981 was not as success- 
ful as the previous sprays, so this year if a spray is executed we will revert back 
to the formulation we have used in previous sprays with better results. Another 
heavy infestation is expected in certain areas of town again this season. 

The Fall Web Worms that make web nests in the late summer appear to be on the 
decrease and we felt that it was not necessary to spray for these pests last year. 
We anticipate another bad year for the Eastern Tent Caterpillars however, and will 
be doing spot spraying to control these pests. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Elta> W. kULin 

Tree Warden 

Director of Insect Pest Control 



46 



THE PLANNING BOARD 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Medfield Planning Board hereby submits its Annual Report for the 
year ending December 31, 1981. 

MEDFIELD STATE HOSPITAL 

The Planning Board achieved its major goal of 1981 when the Annual Town 
Meeting voted unanimously to rezone the Medfield State Hospital property and 
adjacent areas in accordance with a land reuse plan developed over the pre- 
vious sixteen months by the Board and its consultants. The 100-acre campus 
of the Hospital was rezoned from RT (Residential -Town) to B-I (Business- 
Industrial) . An additional 650 acres, including the open land around the 
Hospital and adjacent low lying areas along the Charles River, were rezoned 
A (Agricultural) , making Medfield the first town in Massachusetts to adopt 
exclusive agricultural zoning. Meanwhile, despite year-long discussion, 
study and controversy at the State level regarding the future of Medfield 
and other State Hospitals, there was no change in the status quo at year's 
end, the Hospital continuing to function with about 250 patients. 

OTHER ZONING CHANGES 

Other zoning changes recommended by the Board and approved at the Annual 
Town Meeting were as follows: 

1. Rezoning from B to B-I a small portion of the lot occupied by Medfield 
Industrial Park, to bring it into conformity with the remainder of the 
lot. 

2. Minor modification of the Sign Bylaw. 

3. Driveways: Elimination of the "separate entrance and exit" require- 
ment. 

4. Parking: Reduction of minimum dimensions for required parking spaces. 

OTHER BUSINESS 



Because of a 34% reduction in its budget for 1981-82 (owing to Propo- 
sition 2*2 austerity), the Board undertook no new planning projects during 
the year, but continued to carry out its Subdivision Control duties, ap- 
proving two definitive subdivision plans - Equestrian Park Estates II and 
Fieldstone Estates II - and overseeing construction of subdivision work in 
progress. The Board also approved modification of Ard Righ II, a previously 
approved subdivision. 

A site plan for an eleven-unit condominium on Spring Street was submitted 
to and approved by the Board . 

CENTRAL BUSINESS DISTRICT 

In the Central Business District, the full-scale renovation of the old 
hat factory buildings and grounds into new quarters for Corning Medical Re- 

47 



search Division marks a significant "face lift" in the downtown. 

INDUSTRIAL DISTRICT 

There was no new development of land in the Industrial District during 
the year. The Board held a public meeting to discuss possible zoning changes 
for a 52-acre tract of industrial/residential land, but decided against pro- 
posing rezoning this year. 

TOWN MEETING ARTICLES FOR 1982 TOWN MEETING 

In preparation for the 1982 Town Meeting, the Board drafted and held 
hearings on two proposed articles: 

1) To add to the Zoning Bylaw a section prohibiting disposal of Low Level 
Radioactive Waste in Medfield, and 

2) To propose acceptance of Pine Street from Cedar Lane to the Dover Line 
and Orchard Street from the Norfolk line to the Millis line as Scenic 

Ways. 

GENERAL 

Members cf the Planning Board served on several other town committees 
and attended meetings of the Massachusetts Federation of Planning Boards and 
other meetings of interest. They also took an active part in supporting 
legislation of benefit to the Town. 

The Planning Board appointed four new members to the MPIC and two to the 
Sign Advisory Board. 

Whitman & Howard, the Board's engineering consultants, continued to 
assist the Board by reviewing subdivision plans and site plans, and by in- 
specting new street construction. 

The Board acknowledges with thanks the cooperation and assistance of 
other Town Boards and Departments over the year. 

Planning Board meetings are open to the public, and the public is en- 
couraged to attend. All appointments with the Board must be made by the 
Thursday noon prior to the Monday meeting. Requests for information or ap- 
pointments should be directed to the Planning Administrator, Mildred E. 
Willis, at the Town House. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Vani&l I/. FtvutzAcke., Chairman 
MoaqoaqJ: E. BancAofit, Vice 

Chairman 
C. R-lchcUid McCuZlougk, Secretary 
RobunX A. Kivu>man 
Vanlel W. Mt/e 



48 



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49 



THE MASTER PLAN 
IMPLEMENTATION COMMITTEE 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

For the benefit of the new residents of the Town, the MPIC would like to 
take this opportunity to explain what the Master Plan Implementation 
Committee is and what role it plays in the operation of our Town government. 

Back in 1962-1964 a Master Plan was adopted by the Town of Medfield with 
specific recommendations for changes and/or planning in some functions of the 
Town government over a fifteen-year period. A committee of townspeople, the 
MPIC, was appointed by the Planning Board to check periodically with Town 
departments and committees on the implementation of the recommendations. The 
MPIC also has been asked over the years to conduct studies and research 
various single issues for the Planning Board as well as serving in an ad- 
visory capacity on committees such as the Committee to Study Design Control 
and the Sign Advisory Board. The MPIC has also reviewed warrants for the 
Town Meeting with reference to the guidelines set forth by the Master Plan. 
In September 1974, a planning forum was held for all Town Boards which up- 
dated the original Master Plan and resulted in a list of current recommend- 
ations. 

In the year 1982, the MPIC, with direction from the Planning Board, will 
study two areas that were recommended by the latest update: 

1. The development of a capital spending program, and 

2. Housing needs in the Town with particular emphasis on the older 
residences near the business area. 

There has been much accomplished in the Town since the Master Plan was 
drawn up approximately 17 years ago; however, we realize that there is much 
more to be done. Your committee members are pleased to have been of service 
to the Town in this capacity and are looking forward to even further ac- 
complishments during the year 1982. 

Respectfully submitted, 

\J ViQ-inLa. Lou.gkna.nz, Chairman 
Jo&zph Co&Upoti, Secretary 
JuLLz Alcuio 
Kznmth E. lojnhJjm, 
LotiQJXa FadeA 
John F. McCarthy 
kLlczn J. McGowcm 
3oi><Lph R. ?<vik2A, In. 
RoboAt M. SVtong 



50 



BOARD OF APPEALS ON ZONING 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

During 1981 the Appeals Board heard and acted on 35 applications, as 
follows : 

Six applications for variances to construct within front-, side-, and/or 
rear -yard setback - three were denied and three were allowed. 

Six applications were received to allow construction within lots of insuf- 
ficient frontage and/or width at setback - four were denied and two were 
allowed. 

Three requests for sign variances were heard - two were allowed and one 
denied. 

An application for a rehearing and an appeal from the Building Inspector's 
decision were received and both denied. 

Seven applications for Special Permits to work in wetlands were heard - 
three were allowed and four denied; however, three of those permits were 
ultimately granted by the Norfolk County Superior Court. 

A Special Permit to allow the use of a construction trailer was granted. 

Two requests for Special Permits for home occupations were received - one 
was allowed and one denied. 

An application for a rehearing was denied. 

Two requests for Special Permit for two medical buildings were denied. 

Three requests for Special Permits to excavate and transfer earth and fill 
material within the flood plain - two were allowed and one denied . 

A Special Permit for a Community Residence was denied and a Special Permit 
for an industrial building, the use of which was uncertain, was also denied 

All decisions were unanimous. 

Respectfully submitted, 

BOARD OF APPEALS ON ZONING 

RobQAt F. Sylvia, Chairman 
CkaJiZ<U> H. ?2.ck, Clerk 
BuAgeAA P. Stxx.ndlo.Lj, Member 
Paul B. Rhuda, Associate 
Ralph C. Good, Jn.. , Associate 



51 



SIGN ADVISORY BOARD 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Sign Advisory Board has continued throughout 1981 in its advisory role to 
the Building Inspector by reviewing all applications for signs. 

In addition, the Sign Advisory Board has continued its discussions on changes 
in the Sign Bylaw as more experience with the law is obtained. 

Respectfully submitted, 

HzZzn K. WzlnZAt, Chairman 

David F. Ckoate., 111, Resigned 

Philip Bonanno 

ZkahlzA E. Mitchell 

Daniel W. Hye. 

Hoy C. Wat&on 

Donald H. Handing 



**fm m M '■ 




Lions Club Gift of Tree Planted at Ralph Wheelock School 



52 



STUDY COMMITTEE FOR DESIGN CONTROLS 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Study Committee for Design Controls was established as mandated by 
the 1980 Annual Town Meeting to study desirability of establishing some type 
of design control on new construction of commercial and industrial properties, 
and non-owner-occupied multifamily housing. This year membership has been 
filled, except for a representative of downtown merchants and one more member 
at large. Four meetings were held during 1981. 

The Committee has reviewed the existing Sign Bylaw as a form of design 
control and is examining design control laws and guidelines in other towns. 
Due to the complexity of the question of what, if any, design controls should 
be adopted by the Town, no recommendation was made during this year. The 
Committee will continue examination and discussion of design control issues 
and issue a recommendation during 1982. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Ann M. Btayton 

VanidJL V. fiuXz^okt, Temporary 

Chairman 
Vonald H. Handing 
Thompson S, LingzZ 
Virginia M. Lough.na.ne. 
PouUvick J. McVonough, Ebq. 
Joseph. R. PaAkeA, In. 
Robojvt L. VoUmuth 



53 



TRUSTEES OF THE MEMORIAL 
PUBLIC LIBRARY 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Board of Library Trustees is pleased to submit its Annual Report for 
the year ending December, 1981, one in which our activities were dominated by 
the Rectory renovation/expansion project authorized last year. 

Board membership was relatively stable during 1981. In March we bid fare- 
well to Ann Thompson, a valued and several term member and to Robert Krasnosky, 
both of whom declined to run for re-election. In a multi-candidate election, 
Patricia Kallio (an interim Trustee) , Elizabeth Martin and David Temple were 
elected and since then the Board is unchanged, providing for continuity on 
various Committees, in areas of particular expertise and in the general de- 
cision making relating to the expansion project. 

We were pleased that the budget constraints imposed by Proposition 2h 
neither altered materially the services provided by the Library nor detracted 
from their quality. We owe much to the planning and creativity of our Library 
Director, Jane Archer, our Children's Librarian. Connie Jones, and the rest of 
the staff. Despite reduced staffing and hours, and the elimination of much of 
our special programming due to the disruption of on-going construction, the 
Town in a recent survey, ranked the Library seventh of all Town services, be- 
hind only health and safety-related services; reduced Library hours was ranked 
as the third most important service to be restored should monies become avail- 
able. One factor in reducing our operating budget for fiscal 1982 was our 
turning over to the Medfield Historical Society the operating and maintenance 
costs for the small Town-owned former bank building on Pleasant Street 
occupied by the Society. 

As to the expansion project, matters began well when the Zoning Board of 
Appeals rendered a favorable decision on our application for Special Permits 
and Variances, thereby permitting the conversion of the Rectory and the con- 
struction of the connecting link; their denial of parking-related variances 
forced us to reduce the scope of the project, but in doing so we eliminated 
certain site engineering costs. Our general contractor, Commercial Improve- 
ment Specialists, Inc. of Walpole, Massachusetts, was chosen based on a bid 
substantially lower than that of other contractors; financial and other re- 
ferences were evaluated in the bidding process and a construction contract was 
executed in mid March, which contract provided for payment and performance 
bonds. After many months of good, although slow, progress, the renovation 
and construction work came to a virtual halt in the early fall when the 
general contractor ran into severe financial troubles causing them to file a 
reorganization petition with the Bankruptcy Court. As of this writing, bank- 
ruptcy proceedings ensue and it is unclear when the few weeks of construction 
work remaining to be completed will be undertaken, and by whom; thus, it is 
impossible to predict when the expanded Library facilities can, in fact, be 
opened although most of the interior and exterior are complete with the 
furniture and furnishings awaiting use by our patrons. 

Because of the usual cost over-runs involved in any construction project, 
it became apparent that our project budget would exceed the limits of the 

54 



THE MEMORIAL PUBLIC LIBRARY 

Federal Revenue Sharing funds appropriated by the Town; therefore, a building 
fundraising drive was undertaken with our Vice Chairperson, Arthur Brodeur, 
leading the way. We received a warm and generous response from the Town by 
way of individual, as well as memorial fund contributions and by way of gifts 
from community organizations and local businesses. We are most grateful for 
the Town's commitment to its Library facilities and to the educational and 
recreational services a good library can provide. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MEDFIELD BOARD OF LIBRARY 
TRUSTEES 



MaAtln Gottlieb, Chairperson 

A/uthuA IfriodeuA, Vice Chairperson 

EtizabeXk Ma/utin, Secretary 

VcuUilcAJd KaJLLLo 

Diane. ZXAhop-VUtiwoKth 

VclvaA Temple. 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The year 1981 brought the beginning of construction and renovation work to 
join the existing library with the adjacent St. Edward's rectory. At year's 
end the project is almost complete, and we eagerly look forward to moving into 
the expanded quarters. The addition will almost double the size of the 
library and should serve the town well for the next 20-25 years. The redesign 
of the interior layout will provide a more functional approach to carrying out 
the many services and activities of the library. While there has been a 
minimum disruption of library service during construction, we regret any in- 
conveniences suffered by patrons during this time. 

To meet the cost of unforeseen expenses which arose during renovation, a 
fundraising drive was established. Over $10,000 was contributed by residents, 
Medfield organizations, businesses in town, and several memorial funds. Two 
of the rooms in the new addition will be named in conjunction with major gifts: 
the Browsing Room will be the William E. McCarthy Room, in memory of the 
former Superintendent of Streets, Water and Sewer who sadly passed away this 
year; and the new Children's Room will be named in honor of the Medfield 
Jaycees who donated a substantial gift for new furnishings. I wish it were 
possible to mention by name all who contributed so generously, but a special 
heartfelt thank you to everyone will have to suffice. The expansion of the 
Medfield Public Library has truly been a town-wide effort. 



55 



Briefly, the budget cutbacks necessitated by Proposition 2% have most 
heavily been felt in a reduction of hours the library is open. The figure 
was lowered from 57 hours per week in previous years to 42 hours per week be- 
ginning in July. Also, the library closed for a two week period over the 
Christmas holidays. 

Special programs that were held during the year were a Stop Smoking work- 
shop, highlights of hiking the Appalachian Trail with Edward Jenkins, and an 
evening of drama with Estelle Stahl. Under the capable direction of the 
Children's Librarian, Connie Jones, the ever popular preschool programs, 
Stories Plus and Toddler Time were held in the early months of 1981. The 
special summer children's programs continued (making homemade ice cream was 
a favorite), but the fall activities for children were curtailed due to de- 
molition work in the Children's Room. 

My sincere appreciation is extended to the Library Trustees, under the 
outstanding leadership of Chairman, Martin Gottlieb, for their dedicated 
efforts to solve the myriad difficulties that arose during the construction 
project, and to the library staff, a very special thank you for all the 
support given to me through this hectic but rewarding year. 

STATISTICS 



New applicants for library cards: 300 New acquisitions: 1,112 
Total circulation of materials: 66,487 Total materials owned: 26,813 



Respectfully submitted 



Jane. B. biokvi 
Library Director 



56 



CHURCH STUDY ADVISORY COMMITTEE 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

Following the 1980 Annual Town Meeting at which it was voted to purchase the St. 
Edward's property in order to use the rectory as library expansion, the Board of 
Selectmen established the St. Edward ' s Church Study Committee to examine altern- 
atives for use of the church building which is excess to the Town's needs for 
library expansion. The committee which was appointed included representatives of 
the Planning Board, the Master Plan Committee, the Central Business District 
Committee, the Historic Commission, as well as, citizens at large. It was charged 
with the responsibility of reviewing possibilities for adaptive reuse of the church 
building for commercial, residential, religious, or other purposes. 

A formal request for proposals was advertised in the Boston newspapers in the 
Fall, 1980. Although several letters indicating initial interest were received, 
only one specific proposal for use was submitted by MISTY, Inc., a corporation of 
which Reverend John J. Keane is a principal. Upon recommendation of the Church 
Study Committee at a meeting with the Selectmen on December 2, the Selectmen entered 
into negotiations to lease the property to MISTY, Inc., provided that capital im- 
provements be the responsibility of the leasee. Negotiations broke down when the 
parties could not come to agreement on the amount of rent to be paid. 

In early February, 1981 salvage work began preparatory to demolition. Then be- 
tween February 5th and 10th, a citizen's petition containing 320 names was presented 
to the Selectmen by Cathy Lake. At that time, the Selectmen voted to reactivate the 
Church Study Committee. At the first meeting of the reactivated committee, it was 
decided to readvertise for requests for proposals. Distribution of the RFP was 
made to prior applicants and other interested parties. Closing date for receipt of 
proposals was April 6, 1981. Three proposals were submitted to the Committee: An 
offer to purchase and develop by Robert Shannon, 121 Middlesex Avenue, Medford; an 
offer to purchase for use as a church from Father Keane; and a possible cooperative 
lease offer from the Cassidy Council Knights of Columbus. 

The Study Committee re-examined all probable options including demolition of the 
building, and construction of a parking lot, and/or a landscaped park. The 
Committee also pursued the possibility of renovation of the building by the Town for 
either public use of for lease to private parties. The cost of the latter option 
was estimated at $60,000 plus a yearly upkeep cost of $20,000 and considered prohib- 
itive in the light of proposition 2^. 

On April 7, the Study Committee reported to the Selectmen that of the three pro- 
posals received, Robert Shannon's offer to purchase the building for $35,000 and 
convert it to town house apartments or condominums, which will be tax revenue pro- 
ducing, offered the greatest potential to the Town since it would preserve the front 
facade of the building, and minimally change the side walls to allow for doorways 
and windows. He proposes to develop one or two bedroom units with basement and a 
small amount of office space. Because there are zoning obstacles concerning both 
residential use and parking, Mr. Shannon must appear before the Board of Appeals to 



apply for variances. 

At the 1981 Annual Town Meeting the Town voted to authorize the Selectmen to 
enter into negotiations for a purchase and sale agreement for the church property. 
Subsequently, Selectmen appointed a negotiating team of Sandra G. Munsey, C. Richard 
McCullough and Kenneth M. Childs, Jr. to negotiate out a satisfactory agreement for 
the reuse and sale of the building and lot. A purchase and sale agreement was 
entered into between the Board of Selectmen and Robert J. Shannon on September 1, 
1981. Church Study Committee members continued to assist Mr. Shannon in his prep- 
arations for a Board of Appeals hearing and the hearing was held on February 4, 
1982. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Sandfia G. MuvU>2.y, Chairman 

C. RiahaAd McCuM.ou.gk 

ChcudLu R. MuZLm 

Cathz/Um A. Lake. 

Joan M. Snow 

ElexLnoi M. Awea 

W. David StzpkznAovi 





CHARLES WOODARD PRESENTS KING PHILIP WEATHER VANE TO SELECTMAN DESORGHER 



57 



THE HISTORICAL COMMISSION 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Historical Commission submits herewith its ninth annual report cover- 
ing the calendar year 1981. 

The Historical Commission was established in 1972 by town vote under the 
provisions of Chapter 40, Section 8D of the General Laws. Open meetings are 
held monthly and are concerned with continuing programs consisting of the 
compilation of a house inventory of the town with updating of earlier forms, 
a conservation program for early town record books in the Town House, an 
historic dated sign program, an awards program recognizing local participation 
in historic preservation, and active efforts to ensure that historic preser- 
vation is considered in the future development of the town. The Commission 
utilizes technical services provided predominantly by the Massachusetts 
Historical Commission and the National Trust for Historic Preservation. 

Specific actions during the past year included the following: 

CHURCH STUDY ADVISORY COMMITTEE 

The Chairman again served on this committee when it was reactivated after 
negotiations for re-use of the building broke down between the Board of 
Selectmen and Father Keane, through Misty, Inc . , last January. Arrangements 
were made for the immediate demolition of the 1892 Victorian Gothic church 
building. In response to a petitioner, members of the Commission assisted, 
along with other town members, in a petition drive to bring an article be- 
fore the town meeting, as to the disposition of the former church building. 
The Church Study Advisory Committee recommended selling the property to 
Robert Shannon of Medford for conversion into offices and condominiums, pro- 
vided he acquired the necessary zoning variances. This was approved by town 
vote 205 to 11. 

TOWN RECORDS CONSERVATION PROGRAM 

The restored Mortgage Book 1834-74 was received from the Northeast 
Document Conservation Center and became part of the display the Commission 
assembled in the newly acquired display case that was installed in the re- 
ception area of the Town House by the Home Committee, as a memorial to Mrs. 
Marie Burke, Assistant Town Clerk. This book was restored with a $357.00 
matching grant from the Massachusetts Council on the Arts and Humanities, a 
state agency whose funds are recommended by the Governor and appropriated by 
the State Legislature. This conservation program began in 1976 and matching 
grants totalling $597.00 were received for restoring town records that had 
been badly charred in the 1923 Town House fire. In September the Commission 
applied for a matching grant for the restoration of Perambulation of Bounds 
1834 . We were informed by the Massachusetts Council, that because of the 
escalating high cost of restoration work, the grant would not be forthcoming 
and the records should be retired for use by researchers. As they now em- 
phasize research rather than historic preservation, the Council recommended 
the records be microfilmed for use by the public. The Commission will now 



58 



KIXG PHIL, IP. 




PRINTS OF KING PHILIP, COURTESY OF MEDFIELD HISTORICAL SOCIETY, 




l»n 1 J ,1 P. /.A/V<7 of Moimt ll.pe. 
DRAWING OF KING PHILIP BY PAUL REVERE 



59 



see that duplicate microfilm copies of early town records are provided to the 
library and acid free boxes will be obtained for the early town record books 
stored in the vault in the Town House. 

ANNUAL PRESERVATION AWARD 

This award is voted annually to recognize town members who actively con- 
tribute to the preservation of the town's historic assets, and who make it 
possible for the community to share in its benefits. The third annual award 
went to Thomas D. Sullivan, 15 Juniper Lane, for his innovative conversion 
and renovation of the D.D. Curtis 1875 grain mill and box factory on Park 
Street. Mr. Sullivan converted this building to rental shops and stimulated 
business activity once again in an area that has historically served the 
community commercially. A plaque was presented to Mr. Sullivan by the 
Selectmen. His name was added to the permanent Preservation Award plaque in 
the Town House. 

At the same time in May, the Commission participated in National Historic 
Preservation Week, with a photographic exhibit in the library. Preservation 
week is sponsored nationally by the National Trust for Historic Preservation. 
The exhibit, "Conservation: Keeping America's Neighborhoods Together", re- 
cognized the town's 19th century industrial era boarding houses of the hat 
factory workers, and the town's first post World War II subdivision. 

This exhibit was repeated in the Commission's booth on the town common 
during "Discover Medfield Days" in September and was most successful in that 
the Commission and town residents had an opportunity to share in the same 
sense of neighborhood pride with regard to beautif ication, maintenance, and 
restoration of the houses so important to the development of the town. 
Historic trail guide maps were also distributed at this time. 

The Commission provided eight historic dated signs for homeowners request- 
ing them. Homeowners are encouraged to place these signs on their houses. 
The Commission is available for any assistance needed to research original 
dates. 

In June members attended a seminar sponsored by the Secretary of State 
and the Northeast Document Conservation Center on "Institutional Surveying to 
Identify Document Conservation Problems" at Boston College for technical 
assistance as regards the early town records. 

A list of historic names for newly created streets was supplied to the 
Planning Board. These names would serve as tangible links with the town's 
past, and further identify the town with its 330 year development. 

Commission member, David Owen, is currently representing the Commission 
on the Central Business District Study Committee. Ann Brayton is serving on 
the Committee to Study Design Controls. 

The Commission extends its thanks and appreciation to Town House per- 
sonnel for their assistance during the past year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Elmnox. M. knzM, chairman Donald J. McDonald 

Alice. M. Cfumlzy, Secretary, Resigned Ann S. IKojntzZh. 

David WilmaAtk, Secretary David L. Ovonn 

PalAlcia A. Rioux, Financial Secretary Ann M. Bsiayton, Assoc. Member 

Rob&it A. DoJULoAoAva. LauAa H. Smith, Assoc. Member 

60 



THE COUNCIL ON AGING 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Medfield Council On Aging is pleased to submit its Annual Report for 
the year 1981. 

The Council's services are available to all residents of Medfield who 
have reached their sixtieth birthday. Mr. Wilmer Priest, our Coordinator, 
continues to be available to help you from 8:00 A.M. to 12 noon r; at the Town 
House, Mondays through Fridays. 

One major purpose of the Council On Aging is to serve as a coordinator 
for all services available to the elderly of Medfield. The Council along 
with other organizations such as King Philip Elder Services, Inc., Friends of 
the Elderly, Visiting Nurses Association, and Senior Citizen Club offer ed- 
ucational as well as social programs. Some of these programs are legal 
services, blood pressure clinics, flu shots, and fuel assistance. 

The Council On Aging is very proud of its mini-bus program. We are 
pleased to have Millie Kennedy as our new driver. Remember the mini-bus is 
for the use of all residents who have reached their sixtieth birthday and need 
transportation for shopping, banking, etc. Instructions for utilizing the 
bus are enumerated in the Directory. 

The Council in conjunction with King Philip Elder Services, Inc., offers 
a hot lunch program for the elderly held at the First Baptist Church, Mondays 
through Fridays; attendence has increased this past year. Home delivered 
meals are also available upon request. It is our hope that more of our elder 
citizens will take advantage of this program. It is a great time for social- 
izing as well as eating a delicious meal. 

The Medfield Council On Aging has enjoyed another successful year and 
with your continued support will offer these much needed services for many 
years. 

Respectfully submitted, 

BaJibaAa NotlCSiOAA , Chairperson 
VhAAdWLa Clank, Secretary 
HaAALf liitchalZ, Treasurer 
BaAbaAa Connote, Member 
John Ho62.y, Member 

SuAan MtUtAonaAdi, Associate Member 
lhdddU.ni Ha/iding, Associate Member 
H. Tftacy Mitchelt, Associate Member 



61 



MEDFIELD HOUSING AUTHORITY 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Medfield Housing Authority is pleased to submit its Annual Report for 
1981. 

The Medfield Housing Authority is authorized by and operates under the 
provisions of Chapter 121B of the Massachusetts General Laws, as amended, 
which is known as the Housing and Urban Renewal Law. The Authority is en- 
tirely funded through the Executive Office of Communities and Development of 
the Commonwealth of Massachusetts; it does not receive any funds from the 
Town's appropriations. 

The Medfield Housing Authority is made up of five Commissioners, four of 
whom are elected for a five year term. Their terms are staggered so only 
one Commissioner is elected each year. 

The fifth Commissioner is appointed by the Governor for a five year term. 
The present term of the appointed Commissioner, Jane N. Kelly, expired on 
September 10, 1981. Jane will continue to serve until the Governor either 
reappoints her or another individual to the position. 

The Authority is directed on a day-by-day basis by its Executive Dir- 
ector, Marie K. Roberts. John P. 0' Toole, Maintenance Mechanic, is re- 
sponsibile for the physical aspects of the Authority's property. The dedi- 
cation of Marie Roberts and Jack 0' Toole is easily recognized by observing 
the well run and well maintained housing authority. 

An annual audit was conducted by the office of the State Auditor, John 
J. Finnegan. The audit covered the period of April 1, 1980 to June 30, 1981 
and the results were issued on October 20, 1981. We are pleased to report 
that the Auditor found all accounts in order and no discrepancies were 
found . 

In light of the fiscal restraint being imposed on all areas of govern- 
ment, and as a matter of good management practice, The Medfield Housing 
Authority and the residents of Tilden Village continue to attempt to limit 

expenditures. This is especially evident in the usage of electric power. 
Our usage of power in kilowatt hours has shown a net reduction on a year to 
year basis. Unfortunately, the cost of electricity has continued to in- 
crease. Since Tilden Village is an all electric development, this is our 
single most expensive line item. 

The Medfield Housing Authority's budget is not affected by Proposition 
7H but rather by the State's 4% cap. In our budget for the year beginning 
October 1, 1981, the Executive Office of Communities and Development has 
imposed a 4% cap not only on our entire budget but on each individual line 
item. In essence this limits the managerial discretion of the Board to 
spend money in areas where it is needed by reducing expenditures in other 
areas. The Authority will continue to do its best to maintain Tilden 
Village as a proud asset to our community. 



62 



The Commissioners of the Medfield Housing Authority have attended work- 
shops and conferences on housing needs throughout the year and will continue 
to do so in the future. These programs are continually being evaluated by 
the Commissioners in order to determine their adaptability to the Town of 
Medfield. 

The Medfield Housing Authority is responsible for 60 units of senior 
citizen housing at Tilden Village which include six two-bedroom, 48 one-bed- 
room and six handicapped units, and for 26 units of income eligible housing 
at Wilkens Glen. Inquiries about eligibility and applications for housing 
are welcome. 

The Authority meets on the third Tuesday of each month at 7:30 p.m. in 
the Hazel R. Frank Community Building. Annual meetings are held on the third 
Tuesday of the month of April. Attendance by the general public in en- 
couraged . 

Respectfully submitted, 

VztQA A. GcUnZA, Chairman 
3amQJ> E. Ryan, Vice Chairman 
Jane. W. KoXZy, Treasurer 
Elizabeth L. MaJtfin, Assistant 

Treasurer 
ThomaA 3ot>zph Donovan, Secretary 



63 



THE ARCHITECTURAL 
BARRIERS COMMITTEE 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

Hereby submitted is the annual report of the Architectural Barriers Committee 
for the year ending December 31, 1981. 

In keeping with our original plans, progress has been made in three major areas, 
namely, curbcuts, installation of ramps, and outlining of handicapped parking 
spaces. 

Curb cuts were completed at the following locations: 

1 at South and Main Streets 
4 at North and Main Streets 

Curb cuts to be completed are: 

2 at Main and Up ham Road 

1 at Park and Main Streets 

2 at Main and Spring Streets 

2 at Main and Robert Sproul Road 

1 at Brook and Main Streets 

1 at Main and Janes Avenue 

2 at Pound and Robert Sproul Road 

Upon completion of the Library, a ramp will be installed making this Public 
Building accessible to the handicapped and the elderly. 

Handicapped parking spaces have been outlined at all the shopping areas, school 
parking areas, Classic Manor Restaurant, and Friendlys Restaurant. In the spring 
it is planned to erect permanent upright handicapped signs throughout the town 
square and at other important locations. These signs were presented to this 
committee from the Paralyzed Veterans of America through their representative, Mr. 
James Fitzgibbons. 

-In closing, we wish to express our thanks to William E. McCarthy, former 
Superintendent of Streets, and his department, Rebel Palumbo, Building Inspector, 
William Mann, Chief of the Medfield Police Department, Mr. James Fitzgibbons, a 
member of the Paralyzed Veterans of America, Michael Sullivan, and all of this 
committee whose assistance has made this progress possible. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Rlckojid Kmnzy PauLLne. A. CoulteA, Chairman 

MWiOJid F. Owen UJUZLam J. HoJtlZA, Vice Chairman 

CkaAl&> H. RaynoA, 3ft. BzvQAly Hallowtll, Secretary 

Cfouutie. Shoop PnedznLck BakeA 

Michael. J. SuUUvan Robert L. Comltes 

64 



THE CONSERVATION COMMISSION 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Conservation Commission was created in 1964 to enforce the Wetlands Protec- 
tion Act passed by the State Legislature. The Commission has also dedicated a sig- 
nificant portion of its time and effort to acquisitions of land in order to protect 
the water resources and rural character of the Town. As the amount of available 
land has declined and funds have become scarcer, acquisitions have declined in im- 
portance. However, the protection of water resources and the management of land 
controlled by the Commission are becoming more important. 

In order to increase the Town's control over its water resources, the Commission 
has been working to develop a wetlands by-law. This will protect us against any 
future weakening of the State law. It will also provide another layer of protection, 
since current Commission rulings can be appealed to a State agency, and this takes 
the decision away from the Town. 

The Commission will also be turning its attention to developing a plan for manag- 
ing the land it controls. The purpose will be to make the land more valuable and 
more accessible. Some of the steps to be considered would include cleaning up 
litter, clearing and marking trails, and establishing a woodcutting program. 

The Commission held the following ten hearings during 1981 under Chapter 131, 
Section 40 (the Wetland Act). 



9, 



10. 



Need ham Builders 

Cedar Acres 
Dover Development 

Ard Righ 
Hoover Realty 

Onandaga Lane 
Simor Corporation 

Plain Street 
Medfield Industrial Park 
Driscoll & Hughes 

West Mill Street 
John Basile 

West Mill Street 
John Basile 

North Meadows Road 
Gregory Whelan 

South Street 
Cornerstone, Inc. 

Granite Street 



Approved 

Approved 

Approved With Conditions 

Approved with Conditions 

Approved 

Act Not Applicable 

Approved With Conditions 

Deferred Pending Receipt of 

Additional Information 
Approved 

Approved 



The Commission is pleased to report it received $9,451.50 from the State as 
Self Help reimbursement for the acquisition of the White land on Elm Street. 



65 



We accepted with regret the resignation of Peyton March. Edmund Hammond was 
appointed to replace him. We were pleased to welcome three new associate members: 
John Beale, Lee Howell and Betty Kaerwer. Anyone who is interested in joi.ninp the 
Commission is urged to attend one of our meetings at the Town Hall at 7:30 p.m. on 
the first Thursday of each month. 

Respectfully submitted, 

John F. GutfovLz, Jfi. Chairman 

RichaAd &iyant, Vice Chairman 

BeXty KcLZWQJi, Secretary 

John Bnad&-t/i2.e£, Treasurer 

Edmund Hammond 

TkqA HcvuUion 

David UanZlYi 

Uoaajo VadeAzinl 

Hani on C. Robbing 

John ftzalz. Associate Member 

Lee HowdUL, Associate Member 



BOARD OF HEALTH 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The calendar year 1980 again showed continued growth in the work load for 
the Board of Health agents, staff members and our contracting agencies. 
Growth was especially noted in the areas of on site sewage disposal instal- 
lations due to the need for a great deal of professional expertise in the 
planning and review of proposed septic systems. Our agents and staff found 
themselves spending more time supplying information and on consultation 
services as well as the continuing expansion of the outreach program's re- 
ferral and counselling services. 

ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH - Sanitation 

As agent for the Board of Health, Mr. John J. Keefe made 109 inspections 
of food service establishments and retail food stores and gave consultation 
and advice on 9 requests and investigated 2 food related complaints. All 
establishments are inspected at least quarterly. While most establishments 
maintain their operations within the guidelines of the State Sanitary Code, 
it has been necessary in some instances to request that representatives of 
some establishments appear before the Board where the consequences of non- 
compliance can be reviewed and plans for corrective action may be addressed. 
The Board is currently reviewing a proposal to institute the payment of a 
fine for continual non-compliance where statute allows. 

Under the provisions of Chapter II of the State Sanitary Code covering 
minimum standards for human habitation, Mr. Keefe made 19 inspections of 
dwelling units during the year which included random inspections of rental 
housing and inspections resulting from complaints and observations by other 
town inspectors in the course of their work. Where violations of the State 
Sanitary Code were found, the owner or occupant was ordered to take correc- 
tive action and follow-up inspections were made to assure compliance. Mr. 
Keefe also made 46 miscellaneous inspections which included the public bath- 
ing beach, semi-public pools, laundromats, gas stations, shopping centers, 
and the landfill. Forty-two regular inspections of school cafeterias and 
nursery schools were carried out throughout the year. Total inspections and 
consultations during 1981 were 227. 

ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING 

During the year, William Domey, Consulting Environmental Engineer /Agent , 
provided professional engineering support for the Board of Health in its 
activities relating to management of water supply and disposal of wastewaters 
in the Town and protection of the ground and surface waters. 

Engineering assistance was available to town residents and permits were 
issued for the repair of 13 septic systems along with the necessary con- 
struction inspections. Soil tests were observed at 35 sites. Plans were 
reviewed and 33 permits were issued for new septic system construction. 
Systems constructed were inspected, usually a minimum of 3 times each, and 
21 were approved for use. Installations for 4 on-site well water systems 



67 



were reviewed, including emphasis on water quality and well yield 18 swimm- 
ing pool requests were reviewed. 

Plans were reviewed and reports filed with the Planning Board for 3 sub- 
divisions and site plans, as well as 3 submittals for the Zoning Board of 
Appeals. Applications for 18 installers permits and 14 septage handlers and 
carters were processed. 

An on-going review is being conducted regarding the possible impact of 
the Texaco oil leak on Route 109 as it applies to the Town wells and the on- 
site water systems in the area. Sewage complaints were investigated and 
orders issued, when necessary, "for abatement of hazard to the public health 
and nuisance. Of approximately 600 requests for service during the year, 
there were about 250 site visits, 50 conferences and the rest in review of 
plans and documents submitted to the Board of Health for action. Board of 
Health meetings were attended whenever required. 

ANIMAL CONTROL 

Karen MacGregor continues her dedicated service as Animal Inspector and 
the Board of Health gratefully acknowledges her very capable assistance in 
that position. The Board would like to remind residents that a permit issued 
by the Board of Health is required for the keeping of any animals other than 
household pets. Residents are also reminded that all animal bites or 
scratches must be reported immediately to the animal inspector so that she 
may quarantine the animal, and if necessary arrange for laboratory examin- 
ation. 

BOARD OF HEALTH PERMITS ISSUED 

Restaurants, counter bars, and cafeteria food service 21 

Food stores and markets 13 

Temporary food service permits 9 

Catering permits 1 

Mobile food service/ice cream vendors 1 

Milk licenses - vehicles and stores 1 

Bakeries 2 

Laundromats 2 

Funeral directors 2 

Horse, animal, farm and stable permits 37 

Veterinary clinics - pet stores 2 

Septic installers 18 

Septic pumpers and carters permits 12 

Refuse and offal carters permits 2 

Disposal works construction permits 33 

Repair or alteration of disposal works permits 13 

Well permits 4 

Total number of permits issued 173 

The total revenue from the issuance of permits and the fees for the re- 
view of preliminary and definitive subdivision plans was $6,437.00 for the 
calendar year 1981. 

CONTRACTS WITH HUMAN SERVICE DELIVERY SYSTEMS 

In 1981 the Board of Health awarded contracts to the South Norfolk County 
Association for Retarded Citizens, the Norfolk Bristol Home Health Services, 

68 



and the Visiting Nurse Association of Dover, Medfield and Norfolk, Inc. The 
Board of Health Outreach Advisory Committee, consisting of Mr. Robert Cresto, 
Mrs. Marilyn Rossier, and Board member Mrs. Hope Wallingford was expanded to 
include Police Chief Mann and Richard Whelan. The committee meets on a reg- 
ular basis once a month to review and evaluate the Youth Outreach activities 
and to make recommendations for improving and expanding the program and rel- 
ative to administrative issues revolving around the program. 

PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING 

The Visiting Nurse Association of Dover, Medfield, Norfolk Inc. received 
a large number of telephone requests for advice, information and referral. 
Its staff attended in-service education, seminars and professional meetings. 
The association maintained liaison with other community facilities such as 
hospitals, elder care corporations, councils on aging and nursing homes. It 
also prepared statistical and other reports for local, state and federal 
agencies. 

During the period from January 1, 1981 to December 31, 1981 there were 
nine blood pressure clinics for senior citizens. From a total attendance of 
488, 138 cases were served. Eighty-five citizens attended the flu/pneumonia 
clinics. Medfield residents were included in one general immunization clinic 
and one general blood pressure clinic, attended by 67 people. Sick-room 
equipment was loaned to 48 patients. 

The VNA provided TB testing supplies to the local schools. Mantoux test- 
ing is available in the VNA office by appointment. There was a Mantoux test- 
ing program at SHARP. Lead screening for children up to six years of age was 
provided by appointment. 

Newborn babies were visited when referrals were received. There was 
follow-up when necessary. Nursing supervision, instruction and orientation 
of home health aides was also provided. 

On January 1, 1982, the Dover, Medfield, Norfolk Visiting Nurse Associa- 
tion became a part of the Walpole Area Visiting Nurse Association located in 
Blackburn Hall, Walpole. All of the staff have joined the staff of the 
larger agency. The new telephone number is 668-1066. 

Hours of service (Office Open) - 8:00 A.M. - 4:30 P.M. Monday - Friday 
On Call - 4:30 PM - 9 PM Weekdays; 8:00 AM - 9:00 PM Saturday, Sunday & 

Holidays 
Office Hours - (Drop-in or by appointment) - 9 - 10:00 AM Monday, Tuesday 

& Friday 
Services - Nursing, Physical Therapy, Home Health Aides, Speech Therapy, 

Occupational Therapy and Medical Social Work 

This merger was brought about by expansion of home health care throughout 
the state and the country with increased regulations and requirements. Small 
agencies have been encouraged to become part of larger agencies in order to 
provide more comprehensive services to all residents and to reduce adminis- 
strative costs. 

The following are the visit statistics for 1981: 

Nursing Visits 931 

Health Promotion Visits 103 

Case Assessment Visits 22 

69 



Physical Therapy Visits 286 

Home Health Aide 387 

The following Clinics were held: 

Senior Citizen Blood Pressure 9 clinics 488 attended (138 patients) 

General Blood Pressure 1 clinic 14 attended 

General Immunization 1 clinic 53 attended 

Senior Citizen Flu 1 clinic 72 attended 

Town Employee Flu 1 clinic 13 attended 

Nursery Schools - 4 schools: 2 visits and 1 teaching session each 

1 head check visit. 
Mantoux Testing at SHARP, Equipment loaned to 48 patients. 

MEDFIELD YOUTH OUTREACH PROGRAM 

On July 1, of 1981, the Medfield Youth Outreach Program became once again 
a permanent town position, administered by the Board of Health. Thanks to 
an overwhelming vote of confidence at Town Meeting in April, the citizens of 
Medfield voiced their support of the services provided by the Outreach 
Worker . 

The focus of this position has traditionally been, and remains crisis 
intervention, short term counseling and referrals to other social service 
agencies. In the interest of carrying out these services, the Outreach 
Worker provides individual, group and family counseling. 

In February of 1981, Mrs. Judith Siegel vacated the Outreach position. 
It was then assumed by Mrs. Tandy McClung from March to August of 1981. 
Tandy left due to her husband's transfer to another state. On August 31, 
1981 to present, Ms. Deborah Ross has assumed the Outreach position. Ms. 
Ross has a Master's degree in Counselor Education from Lesley College in 
Cambridge. She has had extensive experience working with children of all 
ages and their parents as their counselor, in such settings as community re- 
source centers, psychiatric hospitals and schools. 

OUTREACH STATISTICS - March through August 1981: 

Individual personal issues 45 

Family related issues 30 

School related issues 24 

Alcohol related issues 20 

Job related issues 12 

Drug related issues 10 

Crisis intervention 15 

Sexuality 5 

Alternative housing 2 

Alcohol related family issues 16 

Psychiatric intervention 3 

Pregnancy 9 

Runaways 4 

Child abuse 6 

Forty-one adolescents received individual, group and/or family counsel- 
ing from the Outreach Program between September 1981 to December 1981. 
These persons received services in the following areas: 

Family related issues 29 

70 



Peer related issues 26 

School related issues 19 

Career issues 10 

Alcohol related issues 15 

Drug related issues 16 

Crisis Intervention 14 

Sexuality 16 

Alternative Housing 6 

Information & referrals 16 

Parent discipline issues 16 

Psychiatric Intervention 2 

Rape 1 

Child Abuse/neglect 2 

Incest 2 

Pregnancy 8 

Birth Control 10 

Runaways 3 

Suicidal behavior 7 

Depression 17 

Young Mothers Group 6 

Individual personal issues 38 

In over 50% of the cases, parents and other family members were involved 
in counseling. These sessions generally took place on a weekly basis. Ap- 
proximately 25% of the cases were also involved with the Medfield police, the 
District Attorney's Juvenile Diversion Program and with the Juvenile Court. 
Youth are referred to the Outreach Worker by a number of sources. These are 
school: 40%; self referral: 30%; Police and Juvenile Diversion: 25%; and 
5% from a variety of different sources, including local physicians, local 
ministers, state and federal agencies, private counseling agencies and VNA. 

OUTREACH COMMUNITY AFFAIRS SUMMARY 

The Outreach Worker continues to participate in the Superintendent's Ad- 
visory Committee, the Police Crisis Intervention Team; South Norfolk Area 
Adolescent Providers Committee; Youth Advisory Committee; meets with Diver- 
sion staff members regularly; meets with police, school staff, church clergy, 
Board of Health, Selectmen, community agencies; Outreach Advisory Committee 
monthly; resource person for Health Curriculum. 

The Outreach Worker has attended 2 workshops sponsored by the Juvenile 
Justice Management Training: "Physical and Sexual Abuse of Adolescents", 
"Services to the Troubled Female Adolescent". She also attended the "Gov- 
ernor's Conference on Children, Youth and the Family." 

Deborah Ross has and is providing several community services to parents 
and youth. She runs a weekly Young Mothers Group for 6 to 10 young mothers 
who gave birth during their teenage years, and have decided to keep their 
babies. In response to many requests, Deborah is offering a weekly Parent 
Support Group for up to 10 parents. This group will offer parents a forum 
for discussion on all age group children, as well as Deborah passing on to 
parents information and/or referrals. 

Another service to be provided by the Outreach Worker, in the near 
future, will be a Drug and Alcohol Awareness Group, with the main source of 
referrals coming from the police. This group will help youths make good 
choices and take responsibility for their actions. 



7! 



Other activities include: a six month evaluation done by community 
members and other service providers, a self evaluations and a clinical evalu- 
ation; updating the information and referral service (on-going) ; development 
of an Outreach Worker pamphlet; speaker for various community groups, such as 
the League of Women Voters, the churches, the schools. Another service pro- 
vided by the Outreach Worker is the Rent-A-Kid program. This program is op- 
erated by the Outreach Worker in the summer and by Mr. Robert Lynch, Medfield 
School's career guidance counselor during the school year. The program pro- 
vides teenagers with jobs through calls requesting services. These include 
lawn work, baby sitting, and house cleaning. 

Deborah, has maintained a bi-weekly clinical supervisory relationship with 
Alex Ringleheim of the Needham Family Services. Supervision assures Medfield 
clients of the Outreach program the very best of service. 

The Board of Health would like to take this opportunity to thank its 
agents, staff and Advisory Committee members for their dedicated service. 

The Board normally holds its meetings on the 2nd and 4th Mondays of each 
month at the Town Hall. These meetings are open to the public and citizens 
are invited to attend and participate. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ThomaA A. CaAagliano, Chairman 

Canol A. Wt/e, Clerk 

Hope. M. WalLLng&oid, Member 



72 



THE NORFOLK COUNTY 

OSQUSTO CONTROL PROJECT 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Operational Project Program integrates all proven technologies into a 
system of mosquito control that is rational, safe, effective and economically 
feasible. 

All mosquito eggs need water to hatch and to sustain larval growth. 

Source Reduction Work: Our primary efforts are concentrated on the drain- 
ing of shallow, standing, stagnant water and the maintenance of existing flow 
systems which contribute to mosquito breeding sources. 

Drainage ditches cleaned 9,689 feet 

Brush obstructing drainage cut 935 feet 

Culverts cleaned and opened 34 count 

Larviciding: Treatment of mosquito larvae during aquatic development is 
the next most effective control effort. 

Aerial applied larvicide 1,460 acres 

Larvicide by backpack and mistblowers 108 acres 

Adulticiding: The suppression of flying adult mosquitoes becomes 
necessary when they are numerous, annoying or threatening to residents, 

Adulticide mistblowing from trucks 64 acres 

Adulticide U.L.V. from trucks 12,672 acres 

Catch basin application. Adulticide and larvicide 992 count 

Surveys, inspections and monitoring in support of our progress include 
locating and mapping breeding areas, larval and adult collections and field- 
work evaluations leading to better drainage. 

The Project received 43 calls from residents for information and assist- 
ance. 

Respectfully submitted, 

AtbQAt W. H&uAQA, 
Superintendent 



73 



THE YOUTH ADVISORY COMMISSION 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Medfield Youth Advisory Commission hereby submits its Annual Report for the 
year ending December 31, 1981. 

1981 marked the sixth year of the Youth Advisory Commission's existence. One 
of the main objectives this year was to strengthen the Commission's effectiveness 
by structuring the meetings and planning agendas carefully in advance, by defining 
and refining the Commission's goals and responsibilities, and by increasing sc 
input and participation. Students have been encouraged to accept more responsibil- 
ities and have taken a very active role in determining yearly activities and pro- 
grams. An unusually fine rapport and working relationship was established between 
the adults and students serving on the Commission. 

While strengthening the Commission's effectiveness, the members have continued 
to carry out the responsibilities delegated to it by the Selectmen: to study 
problems and needs that arise within the student population in Medfield; to cry and 
develop solutions to them by making recommendations to appropriate Town Boards; and 
to support and look into program planning and development affecting the town's youth 

In response to requests from the young people in Medfield this year, and through 
the efforts of the "YAC" , the Commission was very successful in being able to effect 
the following : 

-To save the town approximately $1,000. The Commission hand delivered the 
1981 Town Reports to all town residents. The students were enthusiastic to be able 
to assist their town in this manner. 

-To promote a fair and consistent approach to the treatment of 
in the Senior High School by drafting a Tardiness Policy Proposal, It was i~ 
to the Senior High School Student Council and Administration, was adopted and in- 
cluded in the Student Handbook and the Faculty Manual. 

-To effect a few changes in the secondary lunch program by establishing an 
Advisory Board to the Director of Food Services. 

-To provide greater communications between the students and the School 
Committee. A column regarding School Committee news was established in each issue 
of the "Kingsbury Chronicle." 

-To provide an additional experience for students interested in pursuing 
a career in government or for those appreciating knowledge of the working mechi 
of government at the local, state, and national level. Richard DeSorgher , with the 
encouragement from the Commission, drafted the curriculum proposal for the "Forum 
of Government." This program was highly endorsed by the Superintendent of Schools 
and the entire School Committee. It is tc be piloted during the 1981-82 school 
year to a maximum of twenty-five students who will receive one credit for success- 
ful completion of the seminar. The curriculum spans all three levels of government 
from the grass roots campaign to the activities, responsibilities and routines of 



74 



elected politicians. 

At the present time, the Commission is involved in researching background infor- 
mation on curriculum regarding "Youth and the Law" in order to draft a curriculum 
for the sixth grade students dealing with this subject. The Commission is also de- 
veloping a handbook for its members to assist new officers in carrying out their 
responsibilities. It is hoped that the handbook will provide continuity as the 
Board changes and will, therefore, provide for a smooth transition from year to 
year. 

I would like to publicly thank those individuals appointed to the Commission by 
other Town Boards and the students selected to represent their respective classes 
who have conscientiously participated and contributed their time and effort to make 
this an extremely successful year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

BaJiba/ui Jam TuppeA, Chairman 

RichtVid VoSoh.ah.QA, Vice Chairman 

hhi Mian, Secretary/Treasurer 

Joanne. Commanz, Acting Secretary 

Vat Clancy 

RobeAt Uauahton 

Tandi McClung 

Rzv. Glen Snowdcn 

JucLL Slcgel 

LouuUz Mulock 

Moac Gnlcco 

Tom VanleJU, 

Anne. Wmle. StAom 

CkoIq Eaton 

ALaon Campbell 

Gzoii Ball 

Diane. VanleJU 

Jean lOiata 

Jack HclteA 

Lynm MontanaAl 

Paul UuAlcy 

David PalmeA 

Vebl Ro-54 

\hoAy GU.IU, 

Re.\j. tou. Leila 8. Holdcn 



75 






J* 



L 



l6^I 



VETERANS' SERVICES 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The following is a breakdown of service and assistance rendered Medfield 
Veterans and their dependents as authorized by the Commissioner of Veterans' 
Services for the period ending December 31, 1981: 

VETERANS' BENEFITS 

This assistance includes food, clothing, fuel and medical expenses for 
Veterans and their dependents which the state reimburses fifty percent to the 
community. 

Application for Ordinary Assistance 23 

Benefits Administered 18 

VETERANS' SERVICES 

Pension Assistance 37 

Social Security 29 

Burial Allowance 15 

Education 12 

Hospitalization 7 

I wish to thank town officials for their cooperation and assistance this 
past year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Paul F. CuAAan 
Veterans' Agent 



78 



THE SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 



Following is my annual report for the year ending December 31, 1981. 



Scales 



Over 10,000 lbs. 
5,000 to 10,000 lbs. 
100 to 5,000 lbs. 
Under 100 lbs. 



Weights 



Avoirdupois 

Apothecary 

Metric 



Sealed 





2 

31 



Liquid Measure 

One Gallon or Less 

Automatic Measures 

Gas pumps 
Grease pumps 

Yard Sticks 

Tapes 



40 
4 



TOTAL 



169 



Receipts 
Sealing Fees 



$275.40 



Hopefully the 1982 Town Meeting will approve increasing the fee schedule, 
making this department almost self-sufficient. 

In the near future, all the antique sealing equipment should be replaced 
and returned to the Historical Society. This would enable the Sealer to per- 
form the duties of this office in a more efficient manner. It now takes, at 
least three trips to bring all the equipment into a store. The new equip- 
ment will be all in one case. 

After 140 years, I think it's time for the town to upgrade and modernize 
this most neglected department. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Pafrucia A. Jttoux 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 



79 



THE INSPECTION DEPARTMENT 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The following is our annual report for the year ending December 31, 1981: 

DEPARTMENT PERMITS INSPECTIONS INCOME EXPENSES 
1981 (1980) 1981 (1980) 1981 (1980) 1981 (1980) 

BUILDING 304 (261) 771 (1,063) $15,775 ($9,141) $9,908 ($10,455.71) 

PLUMBING 128 (150) 261 (232) $2,409 ($2,074) $2,991 ($1,923.32) 

GAS 97 (126) 122 C66) $1,273 ($1,420) $1,744 ($1,261.10) 

WIRING 196 (87) 358 (336) $3,045 ($1,620) $4,022 ($3,375.59) 

The total revenue from the issuance of permits and fees for inspections for the 
calendar year 1981 was $22,502 as compared to $14,255 for 1980. Expenses for 1981 
amounted to $17,655 as compared to $17,015.72 for 1980. 

BUILDING DEPARTMENT 

A breakdown of building permits issued is listed below: 

New Single family dwellings 
Additions to private dwellings 
Renovations to private dwellings 
Multi-family dwellings 
New Industrial/business buildings 
Renovations to business buildings 
Additions to business buildings 
Reshingling roofs & installation of new 

sidewalls 
Private swimming pools 
Accessary buildings 
Residential garages 
Demolitions 
Tents (temporary and structures other 

than buildings) 
Signs 

Stoves (solid fuel burning) 
Barn addition 
Solar 
Stables/barns 

TOTAL 



80 



1981 


1980 


32 


24 


34 


39 


38 


29 


2 


3 


10 


3 


1 


2 


19 


19 


18 


15 


9 


2 


5 


6 


- 


1 


3 


3 


33 


29 


91 


82 


2 


1 


7 


2 




304 


1 
261 



1980 

Estimated construction cost on new dwellings $3,042,000 $1,878,900 
Estimated construction cost renovations, additions, 

pools, shingling & sidewalls etc. 804,200 467,192 

New Construction on business/industrial 390,000 490,000 

Renovations and additions on business/industry 538,523 11,400 

New multi-family buildings 

Total enforcement of the State Building Code fell to local building inspectors 
this past year with the abandonment of the State Building Code Commission. Even 
with construction statistics down on a state level, Medfield continues to keep a 
steady ratio with past years issuing approximately 25 occupancy certificates for 
single family dwellings in 1981. 

The Building Inspectors continue to enforce the State Building Code making 
annual inspections of schools, churches and rest homes as well as other places of 
assembly. Inspections for periodic certification of businesses and multi-family 
dwellings required every five years has iust about been completed. 

The assistance and cooperation of Fire Chief Ryan on certification inspections 
of businesses as well as smoke detector systems on new construction was greatly 
appreciated. The Chief and the Inspectors continue to inspect the installation of 
solid fuel burning appliances with an increased number of residents placing them 
into their homes. Residents are reminded of the importance of having their wood 
stove installations inspected and certified in accordance with requirements of the 
Massachusetts State Building Code. 

PLUMBING AND GAS INSPECTION 

Of the above listed inspections, a number were concerned with investigation, 
administration or enforcement in connection with violations. In addition, re- 
inspections were required where violations had occurred. As in past years, letters 
and telephone calls were made in relation to violations of State Codes as well as 
referrals to the State Boards of Examiners. 

WIRING INSPECTION 

The Wiring Inspector continues to enforce the Massachusetts Electrical Code as 
well as the National Electric Code in his inspections of electric installations for 
which permits are issued. 

Respectfully submitted, 

RzbzZ I. Palumbo, Inspector of Buildings 
John P. O'Toolo., Local Inspector of Bldg. 
WaltQA TohtOhlCsL, J/U, Local Inspector/Bldg 
G2.on.QQ. E. Wi/e, Plumbing Inspector 
W&ttQA R. Hijz, Gas Inspector 
3o62.pk F. EAAkine., Wiring Inspector 



81 



INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT 
FINANCE AUTHORITY 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Authority participated in Medfield Industrial Park on North Street 
receiving a Revenue Bond from the Massachusetts Industrial Finance Authority 
to refurbish an existing structure for future occupation by Corning. 

The Authority requires no town funding and therefore its activities do not 
add to the tax rate. 

No applications are pending at this time. 

Respectfully submitted, 

William P. HLkelonlb, Chairman 

A. Lee Howell, Secretary 

Stephen Buckley, Ji. 

RobeAX J. Lankln 

William E. McCarthy (Deceased) 

RobeAt J. McCarthy 



DEVELOPMENT & INDUSTRIAL COMMISSION 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

Highlights of the years' activities are summarized as follows: 

1. Assisted Medfield Industrial Park conversion of the old Hat Factory on 
North Street into an R&D center for Corning Medical. 

2. Attended Zoning Board of Appeals hearing regarding the expansion of 
Shannon Associates of Adams Street. 

3. Attended Planning Board meeting to support Alexander Marvin plans to ob- 
tain access to 25 acres of industrial land from Hospital Road. 

4. Participated in the Study Committee for Design Control and the Sign Ad- 
visory Board. 

We appreciate the support of other Town Boards with our endeavors. 

Respectfully submitted, 

William P. HLkelonlt, Chairman "Donald H. Handing 

Geonge M. Gnaham, Jk. Paul E. Hlnkley 

John H. Shannon 



82 




Town Forces and U. S. N. R. Seabees Construct Bal 1 fields off Hospital Road 



83 



THE TRI-COUNTY REGIONAL VOCATIONAL 
TECHNICAL SCHOOL DISTRICT 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

Many educational goals and objectives were reached during the year 1981. It was 
a period of reflection of tasks accomplished and a clarification of future program 
direction. 

Tri-County, because of five years of past experience, was able to offer more 
skilled services to more residents of the district than ever before. It is with a 
great deal of satisfaction and pride that the Committee looks back upon those many 
accomplishments of the students and staff during the past year. 

Although the school is now considered established and the approach it utilizes 
in education considered successful, several "firsts" have occurred during the year 
which demonstrate the vitality, creativity, and desire to excel on the part of the 
school's personnel. 

This report, then, is an accounting of the most significant activities and 
achievements of Tri-County in 1981. 

Vocational Department 

All twelve vocational shops have been busy with both off-site and on-site 
customer service. This work has been completed satisfactorily at substantial 
savings to the residents in the district, while at the same time providing sound 
educational "hands-on" experience to the student. 

Some shops are more suited to in-house work than others. The busiest of these 
are the Auto Repair and Auto Body departments where major work was completed on a 
variety of American and European made cars. There were four skills areas in which 
senior students became more proficient: 1) diagnostic work of trouble-shooting 
engine problems, 2) front-end alignment, 3) engine rebuilding, and 4) body sectional 
replacement. 

Several towns in the district are benefiting from the work of students at Tri- 
County. Several shops were involved with construction work for the Millis Housing 
Authority's Building Complex, Millis High School, and the Millis Recreation Depart- 
ment. Roof shingling for the Sherborn Fire Department was completed and several 
Franklin residents took advantage of the Sheet Metal, Plumbing, and Carpentry de- 
partments. 

It was, indeed, a very productive and busy year for the vocational trade 
students and their instructors. 

Technical Department 

The service programs in the technical department continue to be supported by 
organizations and individuals comprising the member communities. Expanding the 

84 



scope of their services, the students in the Child Care program observed and enjoyed 
the behavior of toddlers whose ages ranged from 18 months to 30 months. 

Electronics continues to be a popular choice for students and the number of 
females choosing a hi-tech career has increased noticeably. An added component this 
year was the formal organization of the Tri-County Amateur Radio Association. 

Major projects for community service organizations were accepted and success- 
fully completed by the Graphic Arts department. The Southeastern Chapter of the 
American Heart Association was extremely pleased with the 1982 calendars designed 
and printed by Tri-County students. 

Special Needs Department 

During 1981, slightly over 280 students with identified special needs were 
served at Tri-County. This is only a slight increase over the previous year and 
indicates a leveling off of numbers. We have been involved with the special needs 
department in each public school system in our district for long-range planning pur- 
poses and will continue to modify programs as student needs dictate. 

In December 1981, a team from the Massachusetts Department of Education cond- 
ucted a review of Tri-County' s special education programs to ensure compliance with 
federal and state legislation. The report of this team will be filed in the Spring 
of 1982 and is expected to reflect that all provisions of the laws are being met. 

Guidance Department 

Applications were processed and two hundred eighty-five freshmen were accepted 
in September for the '81- '82 school year. That brought the enrollment in Grades 9 
through 12 to a total of 1156 students. Of that number, 52 are residents of 
Medfield. 

Of the June 1981 graduates, 18 were from the Town of Medfield. 

The guidance staff were kept extremely busy with a variety of activities for 
students that were both educational and enjoyable. The testing services included 
the Armed Services Aptitude Test Battery and the Pre-Scholastic Aptitude Tests. 

Several assemblies and presentations were given by the various branches of the 
armed forces group, colleges, and technical schools. One of the featured highlights 
of the year was a basketball clinic given by Nate Archibald of the Boston Celtics in 
the Tri-County gymnasium. Through the Guidance Department, several scholarships 
were presented to deserving graduates from the district towns of Franklin, Medway, 
Sherborn, Walpole, Medfield, and Millis. 

The Cooperative Educational Program has over 100 seniors placed in 102 worksites. 
The district communities have made 58 of their businesses available to Tri-County 
students, as well as other worksites in twenty-one out-of-district communities. 

Evening School Program 

Because of budgetary constraints, the Tri County Regional School Committee voted 
to discontinue funding appropriations for the evening school programs. 

However, realizing that district residents wanted self-improvement courses, the 

85 



Committee voted to allow the school to continue provided it was self-supporting. 

Through the efforts of many individuals, the evening school is operating with 
180 students in attendance in nine different programs. Thus, this first year of 
functioning on an independent financial level has been reasonably successful. The 
experience gained will no doubt insure an even more successful course of studies in 
the future. 

Graduation 

The first outdoor graduation was held on May 31st at 1:00 P.M. in the afternoon 
and the Class of 1981 took their seats under bright blue skies. Two hundred sixty- 
five seniors, their families, and guests listened attentively to the words of 
Senator John Parker and the valedictory address given by Kenneth DeRosier. 

Musical selections were presented by the Medway Junior-Senior High School Band 
and the Reverend Henry Chambers of St. Mary's Parish in Franklin offered the invo- 
cation and benediction. 

Student Activities 



Student activities were many and varied. The outing club offered such events 
as trips in the Newburyport and Quincy Bay areas, skiing on Temple Mountain in New 
Hampshire, and a climbing excursion to Mt. Monadnock which included an overnight 
stay on the camp grounds of Greenfield State Park. More than forty students were 
escorted to a Bruins game at Boston Garden as well as to Beatlemania at the Provi- 
dence Civic Center. 

These activities were made available at minimum cost to the student and no cost 
to the school because of the unselfish dedication of effort and time on the part of 
Mr. Robert Wyman, adjustment counselor, and several staff members. 

In December, the first annual senior dinner-dance was held in the cafeteria at 
Tri-County. Dinner was prepared and served by students in the Culinary Arts Depart- 
ment to one hundred eighty-two seniors and invited guests. The semi-formal affair 
was enhanced by music provided by a seven piece band. 

For the first time, we became involved with Vocational Industrial Clubs of 
America. Membership peaked at 100 students from eleven shop areas. 33 of these 
students vied for recognition at the state competition held in Lexington, MA. Gold 
medals were awarded to two Tri-County students who then represented Massachusetts 
at the national level in Atlanta, Georgia. 

Community Service 

The facilities at Tri-County lend themselves to community activities and they 
were used advantageously by the American Red Cross and the Franklin Lifesavers 
Association. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation and choke-saver courses were offered 
several times during the year to community groups as the need arose. 

The Tri-County Bloodmobile held annually in February collected 66 pints of blood 
More than three-fourths of that total was donated solely by the staff and students 
at the school. 



86 



On-Slte and Off-Site Exhibits 

Tri-County was invited by the Town of Medfield to participate in their "Discover 
Medfield Day" which took place in early October. Several faculty members, students, 
and administrative staff joined the eighty-four other exhibitors in introducing the 
residents in a more meaningful way to Tri-County and the services it offers. It was 
a successful day and no doubt will be repeated next year. 

Tri-County nosted a team from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration 
Aerospace Education Services Project in April for two weeks. The team visited 30 
elementary, junior and senior high schools in the Tri-County district as well as 
several schools in Shrewsbury, Foxboro, and Mendon. The lecture-demonstration was 
used to acquaint the educational community with the major accomplishments and future 
objectives of this country's space program. The project was coordinated by Bibiana 
Nowacki, our Technical Coordinator and the educational programs office of the God- 
dard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. 

Budget 

As announced in last year's report, assessments to all towns did increase in 
July 1981. This was primarily due to the unusually low assessments of the previous 
year as a result of school aid of one million dollars in excess of the amount antic- 
ipated. Assessment to the Town of Medfield was in the amount of $125,731.05 which 
represents 5.6% of the total district-wide assessment. In the future, school aid 
should be more predictable and, consequently, assessments should stabilize in ac- 
cordance with each town's enrollment. 

In conclusion, we wish to express our gratitude and appreciation to all residents 
of Medfield for the support of vocational technical education. We wish, also, to 
express to you our continued commitment to offer quality education to students in 
the most cost effective manner available. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Tri-County Regional Vocational Technical School 
Committee 

SAjdnty F. Hatch, Chairman 
klbQAt G. ChotUnaAd, Medfield 



87 



JURY LIST 1981 



Eileen A. Ackmann 

Olga Alberini 
Jane B. Archer 

William F. Balutis 

Norma A. Barr 
Catherine M. Bonanno 
Marie Bowles 

Edward J. Brabazon 

Charles S. Breen 

Robert H. Brockelman 

Claudette F. Caruso 

Angelo Catalano 

Achille Chiappetta 

Nancy M. Coffone 

Audrey A. Coleman 

Patrick Commane 

Donald B. Cook 

Barbara A. Cramer 

Joseph Crocker 

Patricia Crocker 

Stella Czerwinski 
Karolyn Davey 

Paul R. DeVasto 

Martha L. Devlin 

Louis R. Dumont 

Doris Dunn 

Richard Eames 



4 Fox Lane 

36 Longmeadow Woad 

11 Laurel Drive 

125 Philip Street 

39 Frairy Street 

91 Adams Street 

4 Philip Street 

80 Indian Hill Road 

7 Longmeadow Road 
44 Cypress Street 

8 Maplewood Road 

11 Snyder Road 

51 Indian Hill Road 

43 Hospital Road 

6 Haven Road 

253 Main Street 

33 Ledgetree Road 

41 Longmeadow Road 

4 Wilson Street 

4 Wilson Street 

12 Oriole Road 

5 Bartlett Ave. 

8 Vine Brook Road 

14 Kenney Road 

107 North Street 

12 Curtis Drive 

8 Remsen Ave. 



Personnel; Digital Equip. 
Corp. Spouse: Vice Pres. 
Waitress; Ken's Steak House 
Library Director; Spouse: 
Manager 

Dir. of Marketing; Spouse, 
Housewife 

Banking, Bookkeeping Dept. 
Secretary; Gilette Co. 
Principal Bookkeeper, 
Walpole State Prison 
Project Engr., Spouse, 
Bookkeeper 

Pres. Comark Corp., Spouse, 
Sales Secretary 
Materials Eng., Spouse: 
Housewife 

Sales Corres., Spouse, Self- 
Employ ed 

Dir. of Adv. & Personnel; 
Spouse, Housewife 
Vice Pres. A.M. Lock Co., 
Spouse: Housewife/Teacher 
Packer & Assembler, Spouse 
Asst. Business Mgr., M.S.H. 
Payroll Allotment Serv. 
Spouse: Office Mgr. 
Owner Landscape Gardener; 
Spouse: Housewife 
Area Mgr., Daniel Mordecai 
Co. , Spouse: School Teacher 
Housewife, Spouse: Owner 
& Sales of Classic Auto 
Parts 

Regional Sales Mgr.; 
Spouse: Reg. Nurse 
Nurse, Spouse: Regional 
Mgr., Castle & Cooke 
Buyer for Lingerie Dept. 
Key Punch Operator; Spouse, 
Supervisor, First Natl. Bk. 
Head Meat Cutter, Spouse: 
Housewife 

Orthodontic Asst., Spouse: 
Sales Mgr. Fox & Ginn 
Owner, Dumont Costume Co., 
Inc . 

Housewife, Spouse: Vice 
President 

Support-Mgr. Distribution 
Spouse: Ins. Underwriter 



88 



Anita F. Erhardt 

Robert E» Erickson 

Virginia Ewart 

Francis I. Fahey 

John E. Fay- 
Maureen Fell 

James J, Folino 

Jean V. Fritz 

Timothy Fullum 
Helen Fyfe 
John M. Garrett 

Kenneth W. Getchell 
John L. Glennon, Jr, 
Helen J. Goodwin 
Judith G. Graham 
James L. Gray 
Timothy J. Gray 
Claire Green 
Robert D. Green 
John P. Gulielmetti 

Edythe R. Hallinan 

Dorothy M. Hayes 
James G. Healy 
Daniel Hedges 
Ellen C. Henderson 

Richard L. Hessel 

Ernest B. Hlnsman, Jr, 

Gordon A. Hogg 
Thomas K. Horgan 



24 Knollwood Road 

25 Kenney Road 

89 Pleasant Street 

Apt. Cll 
86 Pleasant Street 

135 South Street 
290 South Street 

16 Garry Drive 

265 Causeway Street 

77 Bridge Street 
121 North Street 
20 Pueblo Road 

53 Causeway Street 
3 Johns Avenue 
7 Pine Grove Road 

10 Noonhill Road 
6 Bow Street 
6 Bow Street 
9 Springvalley Rd , 
9 Springvalley Rd. 

64 Pine Street 

23 Hillcrest Road 

403 Main Street 

2 Evergreen Way 

3 Crane Place 
19 Hospital Road 

91 Pleasant Street 

Apt. B-10 
29 Cross Street 

126 South Street 
331 Main Street 



Housewife, Spouse: Head Coach 
N.E. Patriots 

Eng. Administrator; Spouse: 
Library Aide 

Physical Therapist, Spouse: 
Vending Service Mgr. 
Painter, Waipole Wood Worker's 
Spouse: Housewife 
Photographer; Spouse: Clerk 
Secretary, Spouse: Truck 
Driver 

Regional Mgr., Spouse: House- 
wife 

Swimming Instructor-Lifeguard , 
Spouse: Owner~Pres, Travel 
Agency 

Vice Pres. Merchandise, 
Fashion House, Inc. 
Productivity Programs Special- 
ist 

V.P. Commercial Union 
Assurance Co., Spouse: House- 
wife 

Retired; Clerk, Spouse: House- 
wife 

Mgr., Don's Pub & Grub, Spouse 
Housewife 

Electronics; Spouse, Acct. 
Exec. 

Housewife; Spouse: Senior 
Trust Officer 

Mgr. General Motors., Spouse: 
Housewife 

Assembler, General Instrument 
Corp. 

Housewife, Spouse: Electrical 
Eng. 

Electrical Eng., Spouse: 
Housewife 

Self-employed Financial Con- 
sultant, Spouse: Real Estate 
Sales/ Self-employed 
Teacher, Spouse: Owner Daley 
Foam Products, Inc. 
Accountant, Bird & Son, Inc. 
Student, Holy Cross College 
Machinist & Mechanic 
Physical Therapist Aide-Nurses 
Aide 
Student, East Coast Aero Tech. 

Gov. Property Administrator. 

Spouse: Microwave Technician 

Assembly 

Metal Prod. Mfg., Spouse: 

Asst. Treasurer 

Carpenter, Unemployed, Spouse: 

X-Ray Technologist 



89 



Kathleen B. Hughes 

Eric Iafolla 
Glenn Jackson 
Mark 0. Jacques 
Holly A. Jordan 

Ann Marie Jurasok 

William F. Kearns 

John C. Kenyon 

Mary Jewell Rnowles 
Kimberley Kobel 
Susan N. Kundla 

Marjorie D. Kupelian 

Janet F. Laverty 
Christopher T. Lennon 
Henry M. Lewis 

Thompson S. Lingel 

William P. Ludwig 
William J. Lutz 

Kevin S. Lyall 
Peter Maggioni 

Edwin P. Markowski 

Laurie J. McCarrick 
Ruth L. McCarthy 

Donna M. McClellan 
Debra Kingsbury McDonald 

Patricia A. McGuire 

Gail E. McKenna 

Bradford H. McMillan 

Peter F. McNulty 

George B. Mentzer 
Kathy Morgan 

John A. Newell 
Michael J. O'Brien 
Renee E. O'Connor 



2 Jefferson Way 

13 Pine Grove Road 

43 Park Street 

6 Charlesdale Rd. 

18 Charlesdale Rd. 

23 Lowell Mason Rd. 

41 Blacksmith Drive 
53 Colonial Road 

42 Miller Street 

15 Longmeadow Road 
73 Indian Hill Road 

44 Marlyn Road 

161 Harding Street 
584 Main Street 
8 Stoneybrook Rd . 

16 Cottage Street 

28 Dale Street 
120 Granite Street 

22 Hartford Street 
35 Marlyn Road 

3 Kamark Drive 

15 Snyder Road 

18 Rolling Lane 

71 Blacksmith Drive 
56 Brook Street 

20 Kenney Road 

20 Lee Road 

81 Colonial Road 

106 West Street 

352 South Street 
441 Main Street 

35 Forest Street 
30 Bridge Street 

19 Eastmount Road 



Staff Member/ Continuing 

Education Dept. , Spouse: 

Project Manager 

Testman N.E. Tel. Co. Spouse 

Reg. Nurse 

Toll Testmen N.E. Tel. Co.; 

Spouse: Hairdresser 

Production Mgr/Chief Eng.; 

Spouse: Med. Technician 

Mgr. Scandinavian Design; 

Spouse: Regional Manager 

Exec. Secretary; Spouse: 

Auto. Salesman 

Project Engineer; Spouse: 

Teacher 

Marketing Manager; Spouse: 

Housewife 

French Teacher 

Test Cameras 

Homemaker; Spouse: Res. Mgr. 

of Sales 

Agenda Asst.; Spouse: Adm. 

Assistant 

Housewife; Spouse: Teacher 

Salesman/Deliveryman 

Agent Northwestern Mutual 

Life; Spouse: Housewife 

Associate; David Hart & 

Associates 

Fresident; Spouse: Teacher 

Pres. Exec. Search Firm; 

Spouse: Homemaker 

Mechanical Engineer 

Parts service rep. mail 

clerk 

Design Engineer; Spouse: 

Housewife 

Secretary, Clerk Typist 

Secretary to Adm. Asst.; 

Spouse: Caterer 

Travel Counselor 

Inspector; Spouse: Sales 

Representative 

Housewife; Spouse: Mgr. Gov. 

Advertising 

Housewife; Spouse: Asst. 

Zone Mgr. Sales 

Pharmacist owner; Spouse: 

Housewife 

Project Eng.; Spouse: Reg. 

Nurse 

Salesman; Spouse: Housewife 

Nursing Home Rehab. Aide; 

Spouse: Wave Solder Operator 

Mechanic; Spouse: Housewife 

A/C Mechanic 

Flight Attendant; Spouse: 

Teacher-Coach 



90 



Donald A. O'Driscoll 

Thomas W. O'Neal 

John L. 0' Sullivan 

Constance Papadopoulos 
Mary Peckham 

Stephen R. Perry 

Therese Peters 
Ralph A. Pini 
Patricia L. Pratt 
Johanna E. Price 

Doris M. Rayner 
Jennifer Reynolds 

Carol L, Rockwood 

Vanessa L. Rudisill 
Dorothy F. Ruzzo 
Helen F. Seager 

Judith G. Siegel 

Patrick Silva 
Gwendolyn H. Skillin 

Dorothy E. Smith 

Barbara F. Spalding 

Robert A. Sortevik 
Peter F. Sturtevant 
Eric T. Suereth 

Theodore F. Suereth 



Edward C. Sugrue 

Elaine R. Taylor 

Richard F. Thibault 

Charles W. Tupper, III 

Mary L. Underwood 

Robert A. Vanslette 

Michael Viano 

William C. Viar 
John S. Warren 



98 Granite Street 
12 Morse Drive 

4 Mohawk Street 

906 Wilkins Glen Rd . 
8 Pine Street 

15 Pound Street 

505 Main Street 
84 Green Street 
14 Causeway Lane 
67 High Street 

208 South Street 
292 Main Street 

1 River view Road 

3 Lakewood Drive 
21 Stagecoach Road 
43 Evergreen Way 

348 North Street 

12 Penobscot Street 

13 Flint Locke Lane 

24 Hearthstone Drive 

13 Juniper Lane 

10 Cedar Lane 
286 North Street 

5 Pine Street 

10 Rhododendron Ave. 



104 Wood End Lane 

6 Elm Street 

26 Snyder Road 

54 Hearthstone Drive 

92 Wood end Lane 

1 Stagecoach Road 

58 Pound Street 

161 Spring Street 
339 South Street 



Power Lineman; Spouse: 
Secretary 

Director of Marketing; 
Spouse: Housewife 
Vice Pres. Marketing/Sales; 
Spouse: Housewife 
Customer Service Mgr. 
Clerk; Spouse: Mgr. Car 
Pool Car Wash 
Lead Systems Analyst; 
Spouse: Exec. Secretary 
Reg. Nurse 
Medical Technician 
Consultant 

Graduate Asst. ; Spouse: 
Asst. Professor 
Office Mgr= & Bookkeeping 
Customer Service Rep.; 
Spouse: Gen. Contractor 
Speech Consultant; Spouse: 
Indep. Ins. Agent 
Facilities Assistant 
Retired/Office Work 
Homemaker; Spouse: 
Financial Planning 
Social Worker; Spouse: 
Psychologist Director 
Student 

Homemaker; Spouse: Super- 
visor 

Homemaker /R. N. ; Spouse: 
Hospital Administrator 
Housewife; Spouse: Banker 
Asst, Vice President 
Engineer; Spouse: R,N. 
Consultant 

Head Custodian, Jr. High; 
Spouse: Homemaker 
Retired/Sr. Correction 
Officer; Spouse: Retired 
Secretary 

Infor. Systems Sr . Mgr.; 
Spouse: Housewife 
Bookkeeper; Spouse: Owner 
Rick's Auto Body 
Service Mgr.; Spouse: 
Domestic Unit Mgr. 
Social Studies Teacher; 
Spouse: Housewife 
Retired-Sorter; Spouse: 
Plumber 

Eng. & Systems Programmer; 
Spouse: Clerk 

Gen. Manager; Spouse: Home- 
maker 

Warehouse Worker 
Mgr. Consulting Services; 
Spouse: Housewife 



91 



John L. Wells 11 Upham Road Asst. Golf Professional; Spouse: 

Housewife 
Ethel C. Willacil 3 Hopi Avenue Retired-Secretary 
Janis Winters 45 Hospital Road R.N. Head Nurse 
Catherine M. Wollack 228 South Street Retired-Floral Designer 
Paul D. Wood 23 Nebo Street Teacher Aide 

Vera L. Woody 52 Indian Hill Road Secretary-Adm. Asst.; Spouse: 

Personnel Mgr, 
Victoria P. Young 164 Pine Street Housewife; Spouse: Vice President 



92 



PUBLIC SCHOOL REPORTS 



FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31 , 1981 



93 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



Fiscal 1982 has been a challenging year for the Medfield Public Schools. 
Through prudent management, the cooperation of parents and staff, and a little 
luck, we have met the challenge posed by Proposition 2^ and preserved intact our 
educational program. 

To meet our educational and budget goals, we reorganized our elementary 
schools, eliminated some elective courses at the secondary level, deferred most 
capital spending, and instituted a system of fees for athletic participation. These 
steps resulted in a personnel reduction of one principal, 25 professionals and 5% 
support staff members. In addition, class size has been increased in most areas, 
with minimal effect on learning. 

Recognizing the need to expand our offerings in computer science and the 
unavailability of local funds to purchase the necessary equipment, we turned in- 
stead to outside sources. We were successful in obtaining 14 micro-computers 
through federal grants and additional peripheral equipment through the generosity 
of the Corning Foundation. 

We appreciate the support of parents, teachers, and townspeople in keeping 
the education of our children on top of the list of priorities, today and in the 
years to follow. 

Respectfully submitted, 

biWUam H. Flnlzy, ChcuAman 

John T. Hannzy 

Jane. 8. Jackson 

W. Vavld Ste.phe.n6on 

BaAbana Jane. TuppeA 

REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT 
OF SCHOOLS 

To the Citizens of Medfield: 

I am privileged to make this sixth annual report on education in the Medfield 
Public Schools for 1981. 

The deliberation of the School Budget Request for the 1981-82 year continued 
in January until the annual Town Meeting. The process was more challenging than 
ever as limited funding under Proposition 2 1/2 was addressed, while still facing 
spiralling inflation in all areas necessary to maintain an effective educational 
system. 

95 



Following weeks of discussing educational priorities, the Fiscal Year 1982 
school budget was presented to the citizens. The School Committee and administration 
believed this request was essential to maintain the integrity of public education in 
our community. The largest portion of the reductions made was a direct result of the 
plan to reorganize the elementary school grade structure which had been previously 
studied by an ad hoc committee and recommendations presented to the School Committee 
in a previous year. Executing the plan resulted in full utilization of the Memorial 
and Wheelock Schools with the partial closing of the Dale Street School. Education 
on the secondary level was carefully reviewed with some courses of study deleted, 
deferred, or content was consolidated into other programs that continued to be 
offered. As a result of these measures, nineteen professional staff and four and 
one-half support staff positions were eliminated. 



The community should r 
and services in the school 
strators and the teaching s 
to note that we have surviv 
community must be cognizant 
addressed in future years, 
in Medfield that is desired 
community support for educa 
prevail in the interest of 



emain aware that many of the reductions made in personnel 
budget have placed additional responsibilities on admini- 
taff. Through everyone's efforts, it would be important 
ed the first year under Proposition 2 1/2. However, the 

of the fact that if limited funding must continue to be 
it will not be possible to offer the level of education 

by parents. We are genuinely appreciative of the 
tion and hope a cooperative spirit in the future will 
the youth of Medfield. 



ENROLLMENT STATISTICS 



Ten Year Comparison of Enrollments, October 1 
72-73 73-74 74-75 75-76 76-77 77-78 78-79 79-80 80-81 81-82 



SPED 


12 


11 


17 


13 


16 


18 


18 


18 


14 


17 


Kg. 


- 


181 


183 


187 


174 


158 


128 


128 


116 


133 


1 


221 


203 


201 


185 


194 


177 


153 


134 


139 


114 


2 


240 


212 


205 


192 


192 


201 


186 


141 


140 


141 


3 


224 


218 


218 


211 


192 


197 


196 


187 


135 


144 


4 


246 


209 


215 


212 


208 


195 


196 


198 


192 


128 


5 


249 


251 


210 


221 


216 


219 


207 


198 


202 


197 


6 


237 


247 


253 


225 


226 


230 


218 


211 


200 


204 


7 


251 


230 


250 


255 


232 


226 


224 


213 


214 


187 


8 


248 


242 


227 


250 


245 


225 


241 


222 


210 


208 


9 


235 


233 


235 


219 


240 


203 


195 


213 


182 


188 


10 


232 


231 


220 


230 


218 


217 


205 


204 


214 


180 


11 


203 


221 


227 


212 


226 


197 


220 


201 


191 


213 


12 


183 


188 


207 


215 


205 


227 


204 


221 


201 


181 



Totals 



2781 



2377 



2868 



2827 2784 2690 2591 2489 2350 2235 



SUPERINTENDENT ' S GOALS : Among performance priorities established for the Superin- 
tendent of Schools by the School Committee were (1) instructional emphasis in 
student writing on all levels, (2) continued development of a systemwide computer 
science instructional program, (3) refinement of the evaluation system for 
professional staff, (4) development of the FY 1983 school budget request, and 
(5) assume more direct responsibility for curriculum leadership because of the 
elimination of the curriculum supervisory positions. 



96 



' CURRICULUM : The Computer Science Instruction program in the high school increased by 
forty-five percent with the addition of five semester sections, for a total of eleven 
semester courses. The program will expand to sixteen semester sections for the 
1982-83 year. Introduction of micro-computer instruction was realized at the Junior 
High School. In-Service training workshops were conducted for a large number of 
secondary teachers with a workshop planned for elementary and junior high staff in 
the spring of 1982. In addition, many teachers have received computer training by 
enrolling in college courses. With the acquisition of additional micro-computers 
for a second year through a federal grant, one micro-computer will be assigned to 
each of the elementary schools for the introduction of computer literacy concepts. 

Improvement of student writing skills continues to be a prime educational 
objective. Minimal standards have been re-emphasized and refined on the secondary 
level. Existing elementary standards are in the review process. 

The Health Education program for grade seven was introduced in the fall. 
Enriching this curriculum was the development of units in Family Life Education. 
Under a federal grant awarded to the University of Massachusetts' Center for the 
Family, Medfield was one of five communities in the Commonwealth to participate. A 
local curriculum advisory committee, comprised of parents and educators, undertook 
the critical task of reviewing published curricula and recommending the units of 
instruction deemed important to Medfield 's youth. 

The areas of Art and Music were unified into the Fine Arts Department. Through 
the efforts of the department coordinator and staff, significant recognition has 
been accorded Medfield students through the Boston Globe Scholastic Art Awards and 
the Wm. Underwood Scholastic Art Awards program. Enrichment of the curriculum has 
been achieved through the Performing Artist Series established by the school system 
and partly supported with contributions from civic and school-related support groups. 

Classroom instruction has been enhanced by the approval of updated elementary 
and secondary textbook editions, where required, in Reading, English, Literature, 
Science, Social Studies, Foreign Language and Practical Arts. 



DALE STREET SCHOOL 

With the reorganization of the elementary schools in September, the Dale Street 
School was partially closed as an educational facility. Future use of the school 
will be dependent upon projected enrollments in the coming years and recommendations 
that will be presented to the School Committee by the Dale Street Use Study Committee, 

I would like to take this opportunity to cite the administrators, faculty, 
volunteers, and townspeople who, over the years, have made the Dale Street School an 
educationally stimulating setting for learning. The school itself is structurally 
sound and aesthetically reflects the Town of Medfield. It is a tribute to those who 
were involved in the original construction of the building and those who have main- 
tained a pride in its upkeep. 

The School Committee has noted its intent to maintain control of the school at 
least until July 1, 1983 with the school housing kindergarten classes, administra- 
tive offices, a leased area to a private pre-school organization and use of the 
gymnasium for school related activities and town recreational activities. 

97 



EDUCATIONAL TESTING DATA 1981 

The California Achievement Test was administered in the spring to students in 
grades one through eight in the areas of Reading, Language Arts, Mathematics, and 
Study Skills. Individual student test data was mailed to parents and, as requested, 
results were reviewed with school personnel. With the State requirement for Basic 
Skills Assessment in 1981, the State mandated testing program in grades three, six, 
and eight will replace the annual systemwide assessment. 



YEAR 



1979 



1980 



1981 



ited in comparison 


with the 


classes 


of 1979 


and 


1980. 






VERBAL MEAN 


MATH MEAN 


% 


TAKING TEST 


Medfield 


438 




499 






80% 


Res . Suburb 


439 




482 








Massachusetts 


428 




463 








New England 


431 




465 








National 


427 




467 








Medfield 


457 




506 






80% 


Res . Suburb 


434 




485 








Massachusetts 


423 




464 








New England 


426 




466 








National 


424 




466 








Medfield 


454 




502 






90% 


Res. Suburb 


* 




* 








Massachusetts 


422 




462 








New England 


425 




463 








National 


424 




466 









* Residential suburb scores for 1981 unavailable at this time. 



The State mandated Basic Skills Assessment testing was initiated in the spring. 
Statistics indicate the percentage of students who attained minimum competency in 
Reading, Writing and Mathematics, and the percentage that were not successful in 
achieving minimum standards. 



READING 

Minimum Competency 
Achieved Not Achieved 



WRITING 

Minimum Competency 
Achieved Not Achieved 



MATHEMATICS 

Minimum Competency 
Achieved Not Achieved 



Grade 3 128 (98.5%) 
Grade 6 181 (93.3%) 
Grade 8 198 (97.5%) 



2 (1.5%) 126 (97%) 4 (3%) 
13 (6.7%) 188 (97%) 6 (3%) 
5 (2.5%) 183 (90.2%) 20 (9.8%) 



129 (99.2%) 1 (.8Jn 
182 (94%) 12 (6%) 
203 (100%) (0%) 



I GRANTS 1981 : Federal grants received during the past year totaled $62,967. Programs 
receiving funding were Title I and P.L. 96-212 (Educationally Disadvantaged), Title 
IVB (Educational Materials), Title VIB and P.L. 89-313 (Handicapped). 

Also received was another grant from the Corning Foundation to enhance the 
Computer program. 

RECOGNITION : Each year, changes in staffing result from retirements. It is 
important to note in this annual report, those individuals who have made significant 
contributions over the years to the education of youth, either as classroom teachers 
or in providing support services to the schools. Anna Rossi, (Dale Street): Mildred 
Yundt, (Dale Street); Naomi Beard, (Dale Street); Helen Spittel (Dale Street); 
Mildred Kneer (Junior High); Julia Warburton (Senior High); James Sproul (Senior 
High); Doris Droste (Secretary); Lillian Jeon (Secretary); and Dorothy Avery, 
(Director of Food Services). We extend to each of them best wishes for the future. 

One of the most important factors in the process of striving for quality 
educational programs in Medfield is the cooperation and advisory assistance offered 
by parents, faculty, students and citizens. Our appreciation is extended to the 
following groups for the important input received during 1981: Superintendent's 
Community Advisory Council, individual school Parent Advisory Councils, Student 
Advisory Council to the Superintendent, Student Advisory Committee to the School 
Committee, the Computer Science Advisory Committee, the Family Life Education 
Curriculum Advisory Council, the School Booster Association, the Music Booster 
Association, the League of Women Voters, the Community School Association, and the 
Youth Advisory Commission that sponsored the Medfield Government Forum. 

Town agencies and civic organizations also play an important role either direct^ 
or indirectly benefitting the educational process and students. Our gratitude is 
extended to the Selectmen, Michael Sullivan, Executive Secretary, and the Warrant 
Committee for the cooperative spirit exhibited during the past year in understanding 
the budgetary needs of the school department. The police, fire and highway depart- 
ments continue to respond to the daily operational needs of the schools. The Town's 
Outreach Worker has added an important dimension in the mutual goal of providing 
counselling and emergency assistance to youth who exhibit personal needs that 
cannot be met by the school system alone. Also enhancing Medfield 's educational 
program are the American Field Service, Hannah Adams Women's Club, the Lions, 
Jaycees, American Legion and the Medfield Employers-Merchants Organization (MEMO). 



I personally wish to extend to the members of the School Committee my 
appreciation for the guidance and cooperation extended to me. To the Administrative 
Assistant, Central Office personnel, Administrators, faculty and support staff I 
express my sincere appreciation for the high degree of cooperation that has been 
demonstrated in the past year. 

Respectfully submitted, 
RobeAt QaqaZo 
Superintendent of Schools 



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107 



SCHOOL LUNCH PROGRAM 



Sarapas, Cynthia L. 
Catenacci, Rita 
Collins, Marsha A. 
Dick, Doris R. 
Flynn, Janet M. 
Grover, Mildred H. 
Horgan, Mary E. 
Howard, Ruth D. 
Katz, Noama 
Leslie, Patricia E. 
McCarthy, Hazel J. 
O'Donnell, Lenora M. 
Oglesby, Loretta A. 
Sixnonaitis, Ann H. 
Sloan, Marjorie 
Szylkonis, Irene F. 
Thayer, E. Ruth 



School Lunch Director 

Memorial School 

Junior High School 

Junior High School 

Junior High School (Manager) 

Senior High School (Manager) 

Wheelock School (Manager) 

Senior High School 

Wheelock School 

Wheelock School 

Wheelock School 

Senior High School 

Senior High School 

Senior High School 

Memorial School (Manager) 

Junior High School 

Memorial School 



CUSTODIANS 



Pritoni, Harold 
Bassett, Elton R. 
Boudreau, Joseph I. 
Boudreau, William F. 
Crowell, Kenneth G. 
Hallowell, Vincent D. 
Hennahane, Michael V. 
Howland, George W. , Jr. 
Motes, Carlis E. 
Mott, Harold S. 
Murphy, Donald 
Rieger, Richard P. 
Sessa, Robert J. 
Simpson, Paul A. 
Suereth, Eric T. 
Timmerraan, Joseph W. 
Walls, Thomas R. 
Whiff en, Thomas A. 



Director of Buildings and Grounds 
Maintenance 
Maintenance 
Wheelock School 
Junior High School 
Wheelock School 
Junior High School 
Memorial School 
Dale Street School 
Memorial School 
Senior High School 
Maintenance 
Maintenance 
Senior High School 
Junior High School 
Senior High School 
Wheelock School 
Senior High School 



108 



SECRETARIES 



PERSONNEL CHANGES 



NEW PERSONNEL AND EFFECTIVE DATE 



Behn, Linda 

Cooley, Pauline 

Bradbury, Caroline (Grant) 



Junior High School September 

Wheelock School " September 

Pupil Services/School Lunch Program November 



SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL 



JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL 



Alfano, Jean 
Aseltine, Adele 
Cardoza, Richard 
Hadlock, Wayne 
Leary, Mary 
Shapiro, Richard 
*Warburton, Julia 



September 

September 

September 

September 

January 

September 

September 



Boyd, Christine 
Craig, Kathleen 
Deegan, Andrew 
Hagins, Whitney 
Therrien, Martin 



September 

January 

September 

September 

April 



WHEELOCK SCHOOL 



PUPIL SERVICES 



Rappaport, Jonathan September 
Torraco , Mary November 



Shaffer, Lynn (Grant) October 



SCHOOL LUNCH PROGRAM 



Sarapas, Cynthia, Director September 



*Part-time employee 



LEAVES OF ABSENCE 



Atwood, Donna 
Baine, Carol 
Biondo, Frank 
Gugliotta, Mary Jane 
Kris to f, Ann 
Merkle, Lynn 
Wihtol, Margaret 



Junior High School 
Senior High School 
Wheelock School 
Junior High School 
Wheelock School 
Dale Street School 
Junior High School 



September 

June 

November 

July 

September 

September 

September 



109 



SECRETARIES 



TERMINATIONS 



TERMINATIONS AND EFFECTIVE DATE 



Droste, Doris (Retired) 
Jeon, Lillian (Retired) 
Kellner, Carol 
Kenney, Barbara 
Wilmarth, Phyllis (Grant) 



Junior High School 
Pupil Services 
Junior High School 
Wheelock School 
Pupil Services 



September 

July 

March 

September 

August 



SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL 



JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL 



Bailey, Patricia June 

Colace, Donna June 

Fitzpatrick, Susan June 

Gaudiano, Edward June 

McCarron, Marilyn June 

O'Dell, Gail August 

Sproul, James (Retired) September 

Sullivan, Charles June 

Taylor, William August 
Warburton, Julia (Retired) June 



Anderson, Diane January 

Bolesky, Edward June 

Crescenzi, Anthony June 

Dixon, Kaleen June 

Donovan, Daniel April 
Kneer, Mildred (Retired) July 

Olsen, Janice June 

Reeves, Diana February 

Wells, George June 

Zysk, Lauren August 



DALE STREET SCHOOL 

Beard, Naomi (Retired) 
*Connors, Marilyn 

Goonen, Patricia 

Henneson, Marcia 

Mezzanotte, David 
*0'Neil, Maureen 

Rossi, Anna (Retired) 

Spittel, Helen 

Yundt, Mildred (Retired) June 



WHEELOCK SCHOOL 



October 


Charis, Patricia 


June 


June 


Cusack, Virginia 


June 


June 


Henderson, Dawn 


June 


June 


Johnsen, Scott 


May 


June 


Powers, Gail 


June 


August 


Reardon, Joan 


June 


June 






July 







PUPIL SERVICES 

Kurson, Sandra 

Maiko, Douglas (Grant) 



SCHOOL LUNCH PROGRAM 



June 
June 



CUSTODIANS 

Augat, Charles (Security) June 
Newton, Rowland April 



Avery, Dorothy 


(Retired) 


Director 


September 


Clancy, Ann T. 


June 


Ganley, Phyllis 


June 


Hutt, MaryRita 


June 


Miller, Louise 


June 


Murphy, Anna 


June 


Petersen, Leonora June 



*Part-time employee 



110 



REPORT OF THE ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT 



To the Superintendent of Schools: 

I am pleased to submit my third annual report as Administrative Assistant for 
the year ending December 31, 1981. 

As a result of tax limitation measures and declining enrollment 11 positions 
that are under the supervision of the Administrative Assistant were reduced. These 
included 7 in the food service area, 1 secretarial position, 2 custodial positions 
and 1 security position. Of these 11 positions, 5 were terminated as a result of 
retirements and resignations thus limiting the Town's liability in the area of 
unemployment compensation. 

In an effort to obtain the lowest prices available formal bids were issued for 
Instructional Supplies, Office Supplies, Industrial Arts Equipment, Bread, Ice 
Cream, Milk and Paper Products. 

Contracts were negotiated for the 1981-82 school year with the Cafeteria 
Workers and Custodial Workers while a three-year contract extending until June 30, 
1984 was settled with the Clerical Workers. 

The reorganization of the elementary schools provided many logistical adjust- 
ments that occurred over the summer of 1981. These involved the relocation of 
furniture, supplies, materials, and equipment between the three elementary schools 
as well as painting and preparing the Kindergarten Center. In addition, all 
elementary school bus runs had to be replanned to accommodate the new grade structure 
and the increase in students transported. 

During 1981 the Computer Science Program in grades seven to twelve has been 
greatly expanded as a result of six microcomputers and two printers purchased from a 
federal grant. A second grant has been approved for 1982 that will provide six 
additional microcomputers and one additional printer. This will result in 
expansion of the program to the elementary schools. 

The following studies were prepared for the School Committee and Superintendent 
during 1981: School Lunch Program, Vandalism, Use of School Facilities, and School 
Security. 

During 1981 the Fiscal 1982 school budget process began in early October and 
continued until Town Meeting. A careful analysis of each line item in the school 
budget resulted in the necessary cuts to meet tax limitations. In this first year 
of Proposition 2 1/2 we were able to reduce areas that did net create major impacts 
on quality educational services. 

However, as we approach the new budget for the 1982-83 school year the 
Proposition 2 1/2 funding level represents a difficult obstacle. Many of the things 
accomplished during 1981 cannot be duplicated, for example, the reorganization of the 
elementary schools, the deferring of maintenance projects, the deferring of 
equipment purchases, and the fact that many senior staff people chose to retire. 

111 



Once again the school department will present an open budget process that is 
thorough and provides for public input at every stage. 

Your continued assistance in helping the School Committee and the Administra- 
tion throughout this process is greatly appreciated. 

I wish to thank you, the School Committee, School Employees, Town Officials and 
the Citizens of Medfield for the support that has been given me. 

Respectfully submitted, 

FsicdeAAJik P. BafeeA 

Administrative Assistant 

REPORT OF THE AMOST CLARK 
KINGSBURY HIGH SCHOOL 



To the Superintendent of Schools: 

As Principal of Medfield High School, I respectfully submit our Annual Report 
for the school year ending December 31, 1981. 

The official enrollment for the high school this year was 574. There were 
202 graduates in the class of 1981. Of these, 70.3% went on to a four-year 
college; 5.5% to a two-year college; 3.4% to other post-high school institutions of 
higher education; 20.8% entered the world of work. 

New high school staff members are Jean Alfano, Science; Adele Aseltine, Home 
Economics; Richard Cardoza. Art; Wayne Hadlock, English; Mary Leary, Permanent Sub- 
stitute; Richard Shapiro, Science; and Julia Warburton, Science Part-time. 

The high school administration and staff have continued to study the area of 
competency testing. The State Department of Education is in constant contact with 
us regarding this project. 

Both our Academic Standards Committee and our Student/Faculty/Parent Advisory 
Committee have been meeting on a regular basis during the past school year for the 
purpose of making recommendations pertaining to our school. 

Due to Proposition 2^, we have seen an increase in class size in several of our 
departments. We also deferred offering several courses which historically have been 
undersubscribed . 

Through a federal grant, our Math Department purchased seven Apple Micro- 
computers to supplement the digital Mini-computer which we have been utilizing for 
the last few years. We have experienced a smooth integration of the new equipment 
into our curriculum both in math and other subject areas. 

Our Foreign Language Department conducted a student exchange program between 
our school and one in France. Our students visited in France from February 14 to 
March 4, 1981. The French students, in turn, visited our High School from April 3 
to April 22, 1981. 

112 



In our Social Studies Department, twenty-five students have enthusiastically 
enrolled in Medfield's Forum of Government. This program is being conducted in 
conjunction with our town officials and includes speakers from state government. 

Since September, our English Department has been preparing a literary magazine 
which will include samples of student writing and art work. This publication will 
be available in the spring of 1982. Our high school Debate Team, which took part 
in a regional debate tournament in Rhode Island, received a trophy for their ac- 
complishments . 

Ten Medfield High School students received Advanced Placement credit in 
chemistry for examinations which they took last May. 

For the first time, this year our Art Department has attempted to team teach 
utilizing three different teachers. Fifteen of our students' art work was submitted 
to the Annual Scholastic Art Awards Competition. Three seniors were selected to 
compete in the Underwood Company Scholarship and Art Exhibition and two of the 
students were awarded the first and second prizes. 

I would like to take this opportunity to thank the Medfield School Committee, 
the Superintendent, the Administrative Assistant, and the many parent groups for 
their continued support. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Tcu&oa P. FilZzdej, 

Principal 

GRADUATION EXERCISES OF 

MEDFIELD HIGH SCHOOL 

CLASS OF 1981 

SUNDAY, JUNE 7, 1981 - 4:00 P.M. 
PROGRAM 

PROCESSIONAL Class of 1981 

"Pomp and Circumstance" - Elgar Medfield High School Concert Band 

Douglas Godfrey, Director 

INVOCATION Reverend Charles P. Weber 

THE NATIONAL ANTHEM Medfield High School Concert Band 

WELCOME Leanne Karen Belmont .President, Class of 1981 

MESSAGE TO GRADUATING CLASS Robert Cresto, Superintendent of Schools 

HONOR ESSAYS Christopher John Battisti and Susanne Bernitt Cardell 

"All That I Can Be" - Price & Gesig Medfield High School Special Chorus 

"Hope For The Future" - Strommen Robert Hersee, Choral Director 

PRESENTATION OF CLASS GIFT Paula Ann Quatromoni 

Vice President, Class of 1981 

113 



PRESENTATION OF STUDENT COUNCIL 
SCHOLASTIC AWARDS 



Cathleen Marie Fraser , President , Student Council 



PRESENTATION TO FOREIGN EXCHANGE STUDENTS 



A. F.S. Students 



PRESENTATION OF AWARDS 

Harvard Prize Book 

D.A.R. Certificate 

Honor Awards 

Steven William Mills Award 

Medfield School Boosters School Spirit Award 

Chisholm-Weir Memorial Award 



Medfield Teachers Association 



110 



American Legion Auxiliary ,Beckwitb Post No, 
American Legion Medals 

Robert S. Belmont Track aud Field Team Spirit Award 
Medfield Fitness Association 



Richard DeSorgher 
Chairman, Board of Selectmen 

Suzanne Joy Minter-Australia 
Martha Vila-Mexico 



Tassos P. Filledes, Principal 



Eleanor C. Woglom, President 
Medfield School Boosters Club 

Christian and Roberta Weir 
Barbara Chisholm 

Robert Lynch, President 

Paul Hinkley 
Vice Commander Lee DeSorgher 

Joan Belmont Romanish 



PRESENTATION OF SCHOLARSHIPS 

Hannah Adams Woman's Club 

Medfield Lions Club 

Robert Luke Memorial Scholarship 

American Legion, Beckwith Post No. 110 

Medfield Police Association 

Medfield Jaycees 

Medfield Jaycees-Women 

Medfield Music Boosters Scholarship 

Medfield Suburban Press 

Corning Medical 

Student Council 

Medfield Chapter of National Honor Society 

Air Force ROTC Scholarship 

Page Realty Scholarship 

University of Maine at Orono 

University of Bridgeport 

University of Missouri-Rolla 

Cornell University 

Northeastern University 

Lehigh University 

"Overture To A New Era" - Giovannini 

PRESENTATION OF DIPLOMAS 



Ruth Milk, President 

Dr. John Meagher 

Richard DeSorgher 

Commander Gerald Underwood 

Patrick J. Caulfield 

Gregory Enz 

Linda Enz 

Marlene Heiligmann 

William Barrett 

Joseph Hrncirik 

Tassos P. Filledes, Principal 

Tassos P. Filledes, Principal 



Medfield High School Concert Band 



William H. Finely .Chairman, Medfield School Committee 
Robert Cresto, Superintendent of Schools 
Tassos P. Filledes, Principal 



Message to the Seniors 



114 



BENEDICTION 
RECESSIONAL 

"Consecration of the House' 



Reverend Robert Wood 
The Class of 1981 
Beethoven Medfield High School Concert Band 
***** 



CLASS OF 1981 



Cathryn Diane Abrams 

Kendra Lyn Altmann 

David Andrew Armstrong 
//Jane Marie As tie 

Sarah Lynne Bailey 

Sean G. Bartholomew 

Laurie Mae Bates 
//-Christopher John Battisti 

Lisa Annette Beausang 
*Leanne Karen Belmont 

Ann Margaret Berkley 

*Daniel Cook Bertolet 

#*Penny Etter Bradshaw 

Mary Kathleen Brangwynne 

Andrew Charles Breen 
//Dawn Eileen Brewer 

Janet Marie Brock 

James Anthony Bruno 
David Alan Budwey 
Christine Bulkley 
William Edward Callow 
Laurie Ann Campbell 
John Patrick Cannon 
John Ingalls Canty 
//*Susanne Bernitt Cardell 
David Alfonse Caruso 
Marie Francesca Cicio 
Holly Elizabeth Cieri 

//Louise Marie Clancy 
Bradford Clinton Clark 
Mary Jo Coffone 
Gregory James Cola 
Erin D. Cole 
James Edward Coleman 
Grace E. Collura 
Douglas Bennett Cook 
Karen Ann Cook 
Brian L. Cosgrove 
Ella T. Coughtry 
Cynthia Ann Corcoran 
Catherine Louise Cox 
Donna Jean Cranshaw 
Karen Marie Crawley 
Tracie A. Cummins 
Francis John Cusack,Jr. 
John Joseph D 'Ambrosia 



Brian Samuel Danforth 
Thomas Daniels 

//*Jeanne Ann Develin 
Lisa Anne Devlin 
Patricia Elaine Dewar 
James Zephyr Driscoll 
Timothy Edward Dugan 
Susan Ebert 

Christopher David Ellis 
Lynn Anne Erickson 
Jeffrey Ferguson 
James Edward Feehan 
Charlotte Ann Fernald 
Nancy Marie Ferreira 
Steven Joseph Fetteroll 
Paul Michael Finerty 
//Margaret Anne Finley 
David Clark Fisher 
Cynthia Anne Floser 
Richard Dennis Flynn 
Peter J. Fontecchio 
Emily Jean Foster 

//*Deborah Margaret Forrest 
Laura Sue Fowle 
Cathleen Marie Fraser 
Glen Scott Fuglestad 
Graceanne Gatz 
Walter Paul Glaeser 
*Sean Michael Good 
Thomas David Gorman 

//*Lisa Ann Gottsche 
Virginia Anne Grace 
Kevin T. Graham 
Norman A. Gray, III 
Lisa Marie Greely 
Martha Elizabeth Gruhn 
Reva Janine Hall 
Marybeth Edythe Hailinan 
Paul Joseph Hamilton 
Cheryl Ann Hampe 
Gordon 0. Harris 
John Joseph Harrington 
//Christine Anne Harrison 
*Christopher Michael Hayes 
Robert Haynes 
Stephen F. Hebert 



115 



rarcl rliggir.s 

Heather Joan Hilton 

Lauri Susan Hochberg 
• -:■-_- a Hoist 

Nona Elizabeth Hurd 

Patrick Robert Paul Hutt 

Mary Louise Ippoliti 

Anne Marie Johnson 

Janice Marie Jones 

Michael Francis Juda 
•Crista Louise Kallio 

Joanne Kenney 

Daniel Patrick Kelly 

Patricia Mary Kilcoyne 

David Marion Kimmick 

Stephen Richard Klotz 

Lee Crystal Knowles 

Michel e Ann LaFond 

Tina Marie LaViza 

Amy Joan Ledwith 

Theresa Marie Love 

Louis Paul Luciano , Jr . 

Scott MacDonald 

Lisa Alice Maheu 

Kevin Mahoney 
:: *Kathyann Manganiello 

Darrah Courtney March 

*_:r: :us 

Anne Elizabeth McCarron 

Linda Ann McGonagle 

Thomas Allan McGue 

David Warren Meader 

Elisa Marie Miceli 

Suzanne Joy Minter 

Jeanne Elizabeth Monaghan 

Susan Elizabeth Morgan 

Patricia Joan Moynihan 

Audrey Marie Murley 

Eileen Marie Murphy 

Stephen P. Murray, Jr. 

Sam-el >'.. Nejame.III 

Matthew David Nickerson 

Sarah Jane Nolan 

Christopher Wellington Nourse 

Janes Dennis O'Brien 

Lee Ann O'Brien 

Michael Jerome O'Connor 

Kathryr. Marie O'Donnell 

David Thomas O'Neill 

Suzanne Marie Orcutt 
*Stacey Anne Owen 
♦Stephen Dunning Palmer 

Stewart Coffin Pal~er 

Demetrios Papadoyiannis 



Elaine Ann Papsis 
Pamela Patricia Perrone 
Jeffrey Paul Peterson 
Lisa Marie Petrocca 
Virginia Anne Phelan 
Scott Michael Plesh 
James Curtis Preston 
Jennifer Burt Priestley 
*Paula Ann Quatromoni 
William Henry Reagan, II 
Jacqueline Jane Reis 
Timothy Paul Rhuda 
Joel Robert Ripley 
Jennifer Leah Robinson 
James Conley Rodgers 
"Mark R. Rossier 
James A. Rowe 
Alicia Marie Royer 
Anthony Ruzzo, III 
Karen Elizabeth Ryan 
Sophia Maria Samaras 
Sarah Elizabeth Sanford 
Suzanne Santangelo 
•••"Avery Michael Schroeder 
Lisa Claire Senatore 
Deborah Jean Setterlund 
Jerome Charles Shiels 
Gregg Sturgis Shirley 
Carlos E. Sierra 
#*Pamela Joy Simons en 

Karen Christine Siscoe 

Christopher Fredrick Skomars 

Ellen T. Slowey 

Pamela Mary Snow 

Kathleen Mary Solari 

Renee Ellen Spiegel 
#Meryl Lee Stonefield 

Ann Marie Strom 

Alice M. Struck 

Ann Christine Sullivan 
•Mary Julie Sullivan 

Elizabeth R. Talerman 

3eth Ann Tripp 

trhael Allen Tucker 

Heather Ann Tulloch 

Stephen Chase Van Ness 

Martha Vila 
#Jeffrey Richard Wakely 
#*Carol Ann Warren 

Christopher Willis 
?/*Anne Marie Wissler 

George Noe Woglom 
••■*Maryellen Woglom 

Yvonne Lucy Wollak 



116 



Thomas Joseph Wotitzky Philip R. Zabe 

Elizabeth Edna Yancy Jeffrey Robert Zahner 

Mary Teresa Zuccarini 

MARSHALLS 

Lynn Bellavance Krishna Mahabir 

# Member of National Honor Society 

* Upper 10% of the graduating class academically 



REPORT OF THE JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL 



To the Superintendent of Schools , 

As Principal of Medfield Junior High School, I respectfully submit the Annual 
Report for the year ending December 31, 1981. 

The school year opened with 595 students; 187 in grade seven, 208 in grade 
eight, 188 in grade nine and 12 in the Tri-Valley Collaborative Special Education 
Class. Eight of last year's eighth grade students enrolled in rri-Connty Regional 
Vocational Technical High School. 

New staff renders to the Medfield Janioi Big! School include Mr. AT Ian K. 
Belcher, Assistant Principal; Mrs. Jean Alfano, Science; Miss Adele AseltLr.e. Home 
Economics; Mrs. Christine Boyd, Arr : Mr. Ar.drev leegar Industrial Arts; Mrs Eileen 
DuRoss, Mathematics; Mrs. Tr.irney Hagins, Science; Mr. Armand Leboeuf, Reading; 
Ms. Deborah Olshever, School Psychologist; Mr. Richard Reinemann, Librarian; 
Mr. Martin Therrien, Industrial Arts; and Mrs. Linda Behn, Secretary. 

Adaptive Physical Education was instituted fcr a dozen students in grades 7-9. 

Due to budget restraints, the interscbolastic grade eight programs for boye 
and girls were dropped. 

The Community School Association (CSA) was formed as a parent support group for 
the school. The Junior High School organization provided z'r.a school with financial 

support for assembly programs, equipment and speaker fees. 

Over 200 students from the Art Department painted a 40 foot mural on the 
cafeteria wall. This project was under the direction of the Junior High School's 
art teachers, Mrs. Sue Horgan and Mrs. Arlene Hollo, and the Decorating letartment 
of the Tri-County Vocational School. 



117 



The Junior High School started a Micro-computer Program with the installation 
of three Apple Computers. Each student in grade nine received a mini course in the 
introduction to BASIC. 

I would like to thank the School Committee, the Superintendent, the Administra- 
tive Assistant, for the support rendered during the past year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

G. Vougla* ld<L 

Principal 



REPORT OF THE DALE STREET SCHOOL 



To the Superintendent of Schools: 

I respectfully submit the nineteenth and final report of the Dale Street 
School for the school year ending June 30, 1981. 

Dale Street's last year as the home of Grades 4, 5 and. 6 experienced an en- 
rollment of 321 pupils. Students in all grades had updated editions of texts and 
text materials in Social Studies and Reading. 

The students continued to support the Music and Intramurals Programs en- 
thusiastically. The fifth and sixth grade band participated in a music exchange 
with the Hopedale Elementary School, and the Dale Street all star basketball team 
participated in the final annual Dale Street/Wheelock championship series. 

Parents gave invaluable time and service to the educational program. The year, 
although a sad one for many students and the staff, was lived and enjoyed to the 
fullest. All activities took on a special significance because of the scheduled 
school reorganization. 

It has been my personal pleasure to have been part of the educational process 
at the Dale Street Elementary School for the past eighteen years. I consider my- 
self fortunate to have worked with colleagues who strived mightily to inspire 
children with the desire to learn, and realizing more than a fair degree of success. 
I have received a great deal of satisfaction from my association with parents who 
have supported public education with their time, their words of encouragement, and 
their personal involvement. My greatest professional reward comes from my involve- 
ment in the education of thousands of eager, enthusiastic, energetic and challenging 
children. 

I am proud of our record as one of Medfield's fine schools. 

Respectfully submitted, 

AlZan K. B&tche/i 

Principal 

118 



REPORT OF THE MEMORIAL SCHOOL 



To the Superintendent of Schools: 

It is with great pleasure that I submit the Memorial Elementary School Annual 
Report for the year ending December 31, 1981. 

ENROLLMENT AND STAFF 

The reorganization of" the elementary program of the Medfield Schools resulted 
in the assignment of all children in grades kindergarten through three to the 
Memorial School. Enrollments projected for the 1981-1982 academic year were 
realized with five hundred and thirty pupils registered on October 1, 1981. The 
kindergarten center, housed at the Dale Street School, enrolled one hundred and 
thirty-two pupils . 

The reorganization enabled all professionals, teaching similar grade levels, 
to work more closely in the implementation of the elementary curriculum. The entire 
staff responded in a truly remarkable manner to the challenges presented by this 
major restructuring of the elementary program. 

SCHOOL AND COMMUNITY 

The Memorial School continued to enjoy strong parent support in the form of 
school volunteers. A significant number of parents served the school in a variety 
of ways such as office assistants, room mothers, tutors, kindergarten classroom 
helpers, classroom aides, and library aides. 

Parents continued to take full advantage of various offerings designed to 
assist them with their role in the learning process. "Parent In-Service" curriculum 
presentations, as well as Pupil-Parent Lunch Days, Open House, Classroom Visitation 
Days, Pupil Progress Conferences, Flag Day and Memorial Day Observances, Winter and 
Spring Music Festivals, the Memorial School Art Festival, and Senior Citizen's Day, 
were ongoing programs designed to provide parents with opportunities to observe the 
academic and social growth of their children. 

The Memorial School Parent Advisory Council, composed of over twenty parent 
representatives from each grade level, met on a regular basis and provided valuable 
feedback for the building administrator. The Community School Association also 
served as an excellent source of communication between the school and the parents 
and children served. This organization generously assisted in sponsoring fine arts 
activities for the children of the Memorial School. 

CURRICULUM 

The professional staff assigned to the Memorial Staff cooperated fully in an 
effort to insure consistent, high quality performance to the school district. The 
introduction of the Ginn 720 Reading System, a comprehensive skill mastery evalu- 
ation program, newly revised, and carrying a 1980 copyright, enabled the Memorial 
School professionals to use their skills and training more effectively. All support 

119 



programs instituted over the past four years were continued, such as; SQUIRT, 
Title I Aides, and Project Help Tutors. 

The newly adopted texts in Math and Language Arts continued to add depth and 
substance to the curriculum in place. The adoption and implementation of the 
MacMillan Social Studies Program was extremely successful. 

The IMC functioned as a center for both teacher and pupil study and enrichment. 
Consistent growth in the use of the library by our pupils was observed with an 
average daily circulation of 151 items per day, an increase of 67 items per day 
over last year. 

The speech and language clinician, the learning specialist and the reading 
specialist developed an approach so as to maximize services to as many pupils as 
possible. 

The Junior Great Books Program enabled a number of our third graders to par- 
ticipate in a stimulating discussion group experience, based upon selections of 
acclaimed children's literature. Enrichment experiences for all children in the 
areas of drama, dance and music were presented to the entire student body at school- 
wide assemblies. Attendance at special school performances of the Boston Ballet 
and Boston Opera Company exposed the children to some of the finest cultural ex- 
periences in the country. 

The administration and staff of the Memorial School has' attempted to respond 
to the needs of the pupils, parents and community. As we approach the coming year, 
we look to the leadership of the Superintendent of Schools, the dedication of the 
School Committee and the interest of our parents to maintain and enhance our educa- 
tional program. 

Respectfully submitted, 

RichaAd M. ¥<LtzpcutKick 

Principal 

REPORT OF THE RALPH WHEELOCK SCHOOL 



To the Superintendent of Schools: 

The thirteenth annual report is being submitted from the Ralph Wheelock School 
for the year ending December 31, 1981. 

Our total enrollment as of October 1, 1981 was 534 students. The school popu- 
lation was divided as follows: 

GR APE TOTAL NUMBER OF SECTIONS AVERAGE CLASS SIZE 

4 128 6 21 

5 197 8 24 

6 204 8 25 



120 



Five students enrolled in the Tri-Valley Collaborative classroom have also been 
mains treamed in both academic and non-academic areas. 

New staff members at the Ralph Wheelock School are Jonathan Rappaport, Music; 
Mary Torraco, Grade 5 Science and Pauline Cooley, Secretary. 

To adequately prepare students and parents for the Elemencary Reorganization, 
Visitation Days and Open House were scheduled. These orientation programs prior to 
the summer gave everyone an opportunity to visit the classrooms and meet the 
teachers. 

The opening of school met with great success which can be attributed to the 
teachers' organization and planning of their classroom, the cooperation of the 
students and the support of the parents. 

Library instruction was provided for all students. During a scheduled period, 
skills were introduced in conjunction with classroom curriculum and the study skills 
program. Opportunities for additional educational activities such as plays, read- 
ing, and games were also provided. 

The Reading Specialist in addition to instructing small groups, directed the 
Study Skills Program. Her efforts along with another Language Arts teacher pro- 
vided a workshop for eight faculty members during the summer to update techniques 
and methods in the teaching of Reading and English. 

The guidance department had met with all sixth graders to discuss issues con- 
cerning interests, interpersonal relationships, individual needs and career aware- 
ness. In addition, this setting was conducive to explain students' responsibilities 
to each other and the total operation of school programs and procedures. 

The Learning Center provided a block of time for students who needed additional 
help and to offer support services to the classroom teachers in the implementation 
of educational plans. 

The organization pattern for grade 5 was altered to a more self-contained 
structure so that a closer identification between teachers and students was estab- 
lished. 

The Fine Art's area met with great success. Students were actively involved 
in choruses with an average of better than 50% participation. A total of 225 
students attended the Boston Symphony Youth Concerts. The Instrumental Program 
involved 130 students. The results of their efforts in those music programs will 
be fully realized in the annual Spring Concert. 

The Intramural Program included tennis, floor hockey and basketball. Approxi- 
mately 200 students in grades 5 and 6 participated. 

We are truly grateful for the staff's efforts and contribution in making the 
reorganization plan work successfully. The positive attitude displayed by the 
teachers and the professionalism demonstrated in their teaching assignments was 
evident. The total school situation benefited from the support and cooperation of 
custodial, cafeteria and bus personnel. 



121 



Gratitude is extended to all parents especially the volunteers. The leader- 
ship and direction of the Central Administration and School Committee is most ap- 
preciated. 

Respectfully submitted, 

F/iank J. Hodman 

Principal 

REPORT OF THE PUPIL SERVICES 
DEPARTMENT 

To the Superintendent of Schools: 

Not unlike previous years, the year ending December 31, 1981 was both active 
and productive. 

The Special Education section of our department was assisted by reorganization 
in its effort to provide sound educational programming for students with special 
needs. Having all like grade levels housed in the same buildings allowed us to 
assist some students with similar disabilities within our own schools in small 
groups rather than having to seek programs through collaboration with surrounding 
communities. 

SPECIAL EDUCATION 

While the Special Education census completed on December 1, 1981 does show a 
reduction in caseload when one compares figures with the census completed one year 
ago on the same date, tuition costs in private day and residential facilities con- 
tinue to escalate. 



Students 
Ages 3-5 
Ages 7-17 
Ages 18-21 



December 1, 1980 

17 

241 

4 

262 Total 



December 1, 1981 

18 

208 

7 

233 Total 



We are currently providing special education services for 211 students within 
our four schools. However, census indicates a reduction in the number of students 
we are educating in collaborative and private facilities. 



Collaborative 
Private Day 
Residential 



1980 
15 

5 

_7 
27 



1981 

11 

5 

_6 
22 



students 

students 

students 
students 



122 



We are pleased to have been able to continue evening "parenting groups" for the 
parents of primary age youngsters with special needs. 

Adaptive Physical Education services have been implemented for students with 
gross motor and fine motor problems. Our own physical education staff has been 
trained to conduct the screening and provide these State mandated services for 
students in grades 1-9. 

It is my pleasure to announce that all parental and school process forms have 
been up-dated and clarified as recommended by the State Department of Education. 
In addition, all staff members have received an in-service in the use of our new 
procedural manual. All parents with special needs youngsters have received a copy 
of our new parent handbook. These booklets were developed through grant funding by 
members of our department with parent input. 

GUIDANCE SERVICES 



Individual and group counseling services have continued for students in grades 
6-12 though we have experienced a cut-back in guidance services at the elementary 
level and career counseling at the secondary level. 

M.O.I.S., Massachusetts Occupational Information Service, was available to 
high school students for five months. High school counselors have continued to 
meet with parents and students to discuss the Future Planning Handbook, financial 
aid, PSAT and SAT scores, college applications and have produced a monthly news- 
letter which Is mailed home to parents. 

HEALTH SERVICES 

The nurses continued to conduct the Immunization Record Survey. Vision and 
Hearing screening was completed during the month of November with the assistance 
of parent volunteers. We appreciate the help we have received annually from 
parents in conducting this important screening. 

The State has further mandated that students be screened for Scoliosis 
(spinal curvatures) during the growth spurt years. Consequently Physical Education 
teachers and nurses were trained and conducted the screening of students in grades 
7 and 9. Though time consuming, the results of our screening gave some parents 
very useful information to share with their own physicians. 

Our staff also conducted its annual screening of three and four year olds and 
pre-kindergarten youngsters. The school staff worked with parents, nursery school 
teachers, and other specialists to determine educational as well as medical needs. 
Once again, our nurses combined forces with the Lions Club to screen vision and 
hearing. We continue to be indebted to the Lions Club for their interest in our 
schools as well as their generosity in volunteering their time for young people. 

PERSONNEL 

The position of Case Manager, a federally funded position, is currently being 
filled by Mrs. Lynn Shaffer who comes to us with years of experience in the fields 
of School Psychology and mild to moderate special needs. Mrs. Phyllis Wilmarth, 
who was also hired through federal funds, has left her clerk/typist position in 



123 



our office to accept a secretarial position in another school system. She has been 
replaced by Mrs. Caroline Bradbury on a part-time basis. Mrs. Carol Baine, a high 
school counselor, is currently on maternity leave for a year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

LoaJ> E. Lamb&vt 

Director of Pupil Services 

THETRI-VALLEY COLLABORATIVE 



To the Superintendent of Schools: 

It is with pleasure that I am submitting the sixth annual report to you as the 
Director of the Tri-Valley Collaborative. We are currently servicing 68 special 
needs students from our member towns. Nine (9) students from Medfield are enrolled 
in our substantially separate classrooms. Two out-of-district students are attend- 
ing our classes this year. Such students from non member towns are placed on a 
space available basis and pay an annual tuition fee. These students come from the 
towns of Franklin and Dover. Tuition receipts help to defray the operating costs 
of the Collaborative for the member towns. This has been particularly helpful 
given current financial constraints. 

Our classes which serve special needs children from grades 1-12 are housed in 
member town school buildings that are age-appropriate. Therefore, mainstreaming 
is easily facilitated when and if appropriate. There are two classes housed in the 
town of Medfield at the Medfield Junior High and the Wheelock school. 

Our students present a wide range of disabilities. Some of them are capable 
of returning to regular education, and therefore, this is the focus and goal of 
their program. However, others will, throughout their academic careers, always re- 
quire special education services. These students who require special education on 
a long-term basis are insured the continuity of moving from the primary level 
through Junior High and possibly transitioning to a pre-vocational program. 

This year we have increased our efforts in the area of transitioning students 
from more restrictive private school settings. Several students were brought back 
from private schools to the Collaborative this year. 

A group of our students and their parents have become actively involved in the 
Special Olympics program, with the assistance and support of our staff. I am 
pleased to report that these students have done exceptionally well in such com- 
petitions, proudly displaying several gold and silver medals. 

During the course of the school year, inservice programs will be presented for 
both the staff and the parents on respite care facilities and other community- 
based programs that families can pursue for social and recreational purposes. 
Additionally, we will be presenting a program for staff, students and parents on 
alcohol and substance abuse. Such issues are very pertinent at the pre-adolescent 



124 



and adolescent stages. 

The Tri-Valley staff, teachers, speech therapists, psychologist and teacher 
aides continue to provide intensive remedial programs for our students, as well as 
reaching out to their families. Our program brochure, as well as a student-parent 
handbook has been used effectively for several years now. To obtain a copy, please 
call the Director's office at the Holliston High School at 429-6363. 

We are continually grateful for the support and cooperation of the Medfield 
School Committee. Your Superintendent, Administrators and Teachers assist our 
efforts, and therefore, contribute to our students' success. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MaAy F. TaMAagh.2/1 

Director 

REPORT OF THE MEDFIELD ADULT EDUCATION 



To the Superintendent of Schools: 

January 27, 1981 was the beginning of the second semester of the 1980-81 
Adult Education Program. A total of twenty classes in fourteen different courses 
were continued by the Director. The courses were: Driver Education (4), Slimnas- 
tics, Modern Dance, Typing II, Woodworking, Painting II, Golf, Yoga, Gym for men, 
Aerobics dancing (4), Microwave cooking, Quilting, Clothing II, and Flower Arrange- 
ment. Courses discontinued were Clothing I, Calligraphy, Typing I, Chair Caning, 
Contract Bridge, Automotive Maintenance, and Drawing. All courses were held on 
either Tuesday, Wednesday or Thursday evenings between 7:00 p.m. and 10:00 p.m. 

The 1981-82 Adult Education Program has an initial offering of twenty seven 
different courses. A total of twenty courses were established, with four classes 
in Driver Education and three in Aerobic Dancing. 

New courses offered were Aerobic Dancing, Doll-making, Golf, and Rug-braiding, 
Four hundred and one (401) citizens registered for the fall courses. Two hundred 
and thirty-six (236) were enrolled for the winter term in January, 1981. 

Respectfully submitted, 

John Cuoco 

Director 



125 



REPORT OF THE ATHLETIC DIRECTOR 



To the Superintendent of Schools: 

I respectfully submit my second report as the Athletic Director for the year 
ending December 31, 1981. The interscholastic programs at the Junior and Senior 
High Schools attempt to provide a competitive arena for our athletes, while at the 
same time recognizing the importance and priority of academic pursuit. Our coaching 
staff believes that the combination of athletics and academics is extremely valuable 
to our interested students. Emphasis on one without the other would not adequately 
prepare students for future life. 

At the Junior High, teams were fielded in football, field hockey, girls and 
boys eighth plus ninth grade basketball, eighth plus ninth grade baseball and soft- 
ball and Junior High track and field. Following is the Junior High athletic coach- 
ing staff: Kevin Demeritt, Joseph Farroba, Grade 8 & 9 Football; Theresa McDavitt, 
Grade 8 & 9 Field Hockey; William Pope, Grade 8 Basketball (Boys); Gary Stockbridge, 
Grade 9 Basketball (Boys); Scott Johnsen, Grade 8 Basketball (Girls); Suzanne Moul- 
ton, Grade 9 Basketball (Girls); Mark Brayton, Grade 8 Baseball; Jon Kirby, Grade 9 
Baseball; Judith Coppola, Grade 8 Softball; John Nichols, Grade 9 Softball; William 
Taylor, Grades 7-9 Track and Field. 

At the High School, girls interscholastic teams were fielded in cheerleading 
(fall and winter), cross country, soccer, field hockey, volleyball, basketball, 
track and field, Softball and tennis. Boys interscholastic teams were fielded in 
football, soccer, cross country, basketball, ice hockey, winter track (coed), 
baseball, tennis and track and field. Following is the interscholastic coaching 
staff: Cynthia Crown, Mrs. Dot Hennessey, Cheerleading (Winter & Fall); Loretta 
Fahey, Varsity Field Hockey; Kathy Smeltsor, Assistant Varsity, Field Hockey; 
Richard Cardoza, Varsity Cross Country; Patricia Scarsciotti, Varsity Soccer; 
Judith Noble, Assistant Varsity, Soccer; Jon Kirby, Varsity & Junior Varsity Volley- 
ball; Thomas Cowell, Varsity Basketball (Girls); Eileen DeSorgher, Assistant Varsity 
Basketball (Girls); Bernard Shea, Varsity Track & Field (Girls); Lynn McConchey, 
Assistant Varsity, Track & Field (Girls); Suzanne Moulton, Varsity, Softball; Judith 
Noble, Assistant Varsity, Softball; Peter Goodall, Varsity Tennis (Girls); Richard 
Connolly, Varsity Tennis (Boys); Gary Stockbridge, Varsity Baseball; Gordon Hodne, 
Assistant Varsity, Baseball; William Young, Varsity Track & Field (Boys); Robert 
Amnion, Assistant Varsity, Track & Field (Boys); David Gibbs, Varsicy Basketball 
(Boys); Joseph Farroba, Assistant Varsity, Basketball (Boys); James Morgan, Varsity 
Ice Hockey; Garrett Youlden, Varsity, Winter Track; Thomas Cowell, Varsity Soccer 
(Boys); Ralph LeClere, Assistant Varsity, Soccer (Boys); Garrett Youlden, Varsity 
Football; William Young, Assistant Varsity, Football; Harold Bodozian, Junior Var- 
sity, Football. 

With the exception of the girls soccer team which participated in the Southern 
Independent Girls' Soccer League, all high school interscholastic teams participated 
in the Tri-Valley League. In addition, all freshman teams began competition with 
the Bay State League. In the spring, the girls softball team were co-champions, 
making it four years in a row that they have either won or shared the championship. 
The baseball team also qualified for tournament play for the first time since 1976, 

126 



losing to Boston Latin. In the winter, the cheerleading squad won the annual T.V.L, 
competition which was held at Ashland High School. At the conclusion of the fall 
season, the boys soccer team finished in a tie with Westwood and Dover-Sherborn for 
the T.V.L. championship. In tournament play, they lost to Duxbury in the quarter- 
finals. The girls soccer team also qualified for tournament play, losing to Win- 
chester. 

Other highlights of the year were the two Sports Recognition evenings which 
were held for all interscholastic teams in March and May. The annual Athletic 
Banquet, sponsored by the Medfield School Boosters, was held in June with Ron Er- 
hardt of the New England Patriots appearing as the guest speaker. At that time, 
in addition to M.V.P. awards, Chris Hayes, along with Mary Ellen Woglom and Krista 
Kallio, were selected as scholar/athletes. At graduation, Cathy Fraser was the 
recipient of the Medfield School Boosters School Spirit Award. Stewart Palmer was 
also awarded the Robert S. Belmont Team Spirit Award. 

Tri-Valley All-Star selections for Athletic Year 1980 were the following: 
Patricia Dewar, Girls Basketball; James Belloli, Craig Eaton, Boys Basketball; 
Chris Hayes, David Hallett, Ice Hockey; Tim O'Toole, Winter and Spring Track; Lisa 
Maheu, Spring Track; Jeff Wakely, John Shannon, Boys Tennis; Krista Kallio, Lynn 
LaBanca, Girls Tennis; Dan Kelley, Dave Robinson, Chris Skomars, Baseball; Cindy 
Floser, Leanne Belmont, Patty Dewar, Softball; Mary Bruno, Kevin Grace, Cross Coun- 
try; Amy Corcoran, Julie Grace, Trish Rudisill, Field Hockey; Wendy Skomars, Lynn 
Bellavance, Volleyball; Tom Beausang, Brian Lee, Tom Brennan, Jeff Luecke, Boys 
Soccer; Laurel Hallowell, Laura Nejame, Girls Soccer; Todd Fairfax, Football. 

In closing, it is my pleasure to state that over 50% of the student body com- 
peted in interscholastics during the 1980-81 athletic season. I would like to 
thank the School Administration and School Committee for their philosophical and 
financial support during this past year. I would especially like to thank the 
parents and community for its enthusiastic support of all of our athletic teams 
this past year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

VavAji E. G-ibb& 

Director of Athletics 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL LUNCH PROGRAM 



To the Superintendent of Schools: 

As Food Service Director, it is my pleasure to submit my first annual report 
for the year ending December 31, 1981. 

The National School Lunch Act of 1946 established the National School Lunch 
Program to safeguard the health and well being of our nation's children. This pro- 
gram is designed by Congress as a means of providing nutritious and reasonably 
priced lunches to school children, contributing to better understanding of proper 
nutrition and fostering good food habits. 

127 



School Food Service has become a basic part of the nutritional and educational 
program of the nation's schools. It reflects advances in knowledge of food, nutri- 
tion, and food service management. The school lunch meal requirements are designed 
to provide a simple and easy to follow framework for planning nutritious and well 
balanced lunches. The national goal of the School Lunch Program is to provide 
students with one third of the daily recommended dietary allowances. 

As a result of funding cuts at the federal level and ever-increasing food 
costs, the following measures have been instituted to increase participation and 
provide meals that interest our students: 

1. Special theme days and meals have been used more frequently than in the 
past. 

2. Meetings have been held with Administrators, Parent Advisory Groups and 
students to establish the menu items that would interest students and pro- 
vide adequate participation. 

3. A separate menu is being served at the elementary level since the elemen- 
tary and secondary students have different preferences as indicated by 
past participation levels. 

4. Hot alternate meals are now offered as an alternative to the regular menu 
for the Junior and Senior High Schools. 

An in-service program was conducted for all cafeteria workers. The program 
featured a dietitian who addressed the nutritional importance of the school lunch 
program. In addition Fire Chief Ryan instructed the food service staff in kitchen 
fire safety procedures. 

The Medfield School Committee, the Superintendent's Community Advisory Council, 
the Youth Advisory Council, Memorial Parents Advisory Council, Medfield High School 
Student Council, and many interested students have assisted by providing input 
which is necessary to meet student preferences while maintaining nutritional stan- 
dards. 

I wish to thank an experienced and talented Cafeteria Staff for their co- 
operation during the year and, in particular, the guidance and assistance provided 
by Dot Avery prior to her retirement as Food Services Director. I would also like 
to thank the members of the School Committee, Mr. Cresto, Mr. Baker, the secretarial 
staff, custodial staff, and all cafeterial substitute workers for their support. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Cynthia L. SaAapcu, 

Food Service Director 



128 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF 
BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 



To the Superintendent of Schools: 

It is a pleasure to submit my thirteenth annual report as Director of Buildings 
and Grounds for the year ending December 31, 1981. 

The following is a compilation of repairs, replacements, additions and preven- 
tative maintenance projects accomplished during the year. 

Senior High School : Replaced the two exit doors in the gymnasium with steel doors 
and frames, painted all outside exit doors, inside fire doors, the teachers' lounge, 
the teachers' work room, the girls' locker room, one coaches office and cabinets in 
the Home Economics room. Calibrated the heating system and replaced steam traps 
where needed. Asphalt sealer was applied to all sidewalks and the smoking area. 
Installed a new door frame on the exit in the metal shop. Constructed a storage 
area in the girls' locker room and one in the corridor next to the custodial area. 
Replaced window shades in five classrooms. 

Junior High School : Painted and renovated the administration office wing. Painted 
the closets in both locker rooms. Repaired several cafeteria tables and chairs, 
repaired the backstop and all of the fencing next to the tennis courts. Upgraded 
the girls' softball field. 

Dale Street School : Due to the elementary school reorganization a major moving pro- 
ject was undertaken and completed without interference in work being done at the 
other schools. Complete painting of the Activity Room used to house Kindergarten. 
Kindergarten playground equipment was installed in the area behind the Dale Street 
School. 

Memorial School : Painted classrooms, bulletin boards, and teachers' work room. Re- 
paired chain link fencing and rebuilt all of the wooden playground equipment. Ex- 
cavated and repaired underground fuel oil leak. 

Wheelock School : Repaired all the seams on the small gym floor. Repairs completed 
on the number one boiler. Replaced two heating zone circulators and repaired pumps 
in the boiler room. 

All Schools ; Cleaned and repaired all burners, boilers, smoke pipes, chimneys and 
fire boxes. Locker rooms and receiving room floors were painted. Repaired score- 
boards and time clocks. Replaced glass and repaired damages caused by vandalism. 
Gym floors, bleachers and stages were revarnished. Replaced belts and motors where 
needed. In addition to the specifics listed above, the Maintenance/Custodial De- 
partment was happy to provide assistance to all school athletic functions, fes- 
tivals, shows and for other community groups making use of the buildings. 

I am grateful for the support given to me by my entire staff. Sincere appre- 
ciation is extended to the School Committee, Superintendent and the Administrative 
Assistant for their cooperation and assistance during the year. 



129 



I am grateful for the support given to me by my entire staff. Sincere appre- 
ciation is extended to the School Committee, Superintendent and the Administrative 
Assistant for their cooperation and assistance during the year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

HaAold VKitOYU. 

Director of Buildings and Grounds 



130 



TOWN CLERK'S REPORT 
VITAL STATISTICS 



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141 



WARRANT FOR THE ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Norfolk, ss. 

To either of the Constables of the Town of Medfield, in said County, 
greetings: 

In the name of the Commonwealth, you are directed to notify and warn the in- 
habitants of the Town of Medfield, qualified to vote in elections and in Town 
affairs, to meet at the Memorial School, in said Medfield, on Monday, the 
thirtieth day of March, A.D., 1981 at 6:00 A.M., then and there to act on the 
following articles: 

ARTICLE 1. To choose all Town Officers required to be elected annually by 
ballot, viz: 

One Moderator, one Selectman, and one member of the Park and 
Recreation Commission, all for one year. 

One Trustee of the Public Library for two years. 

One Selectman, one Assessor, two members of the School Committee, 
two Trustees of the Public Library, one Treasurer, three members 
of the Park and Recreation Commission, all for three years. 

One member of the Planning Board for five years. 

The polls will be opened at 6:00 A.M. and shall be closed at 8:00 P.M. 

On Monday, the twenty-seventh day of April, A.D., 1981 commencing at 7:30 P.M. 
the following articles will be acted on in the Amos Clark Kingsbury School 
gymnasium in said Medfield, viz: Articles 2 through 50 will appear under re- 
port of Adjourned Town Meeting, April 27, 1981. 

And you are directed to serve this warrant by posting an attested copy 
thereof, in the usual place for posting warrants in said Medfield, seven days 
at least before the time of holding said meeting. 

Hereof fail not and make due return of this warrant with your doings thereon, 
unto the Town Clerk at the time and place of meeting aforesaid. 

Given under our hands this tenth day of March, A.D. Nineteen Hundred and 
Eighty-one. 

RLchaAd P. VtSoigheA, Chairman 
R. Edwand Beotd, Clerk 
BOARD OF SELECTMEN 



142 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Norfolk, ss 



March 21, 1981 



By virtue of this warrant, I have notified and warned the inhabitants of 
the Town of Medfield, qualified to vote in elections, to meet at the time 
and for the purpose named, by posting attested copies of said warrant in not 
less than five public places in the Town of Medfield at least seven days be- 
fore the time of holding the meeting. 



A true copy attest: 



GaoKQZ W. IUngAbuA.y 
CONSTABLE OF MEDFIELD 



Nancy J. Preston 
TOWN CLERK 

TOWN OF MEDFIELD 

TOWN ELECTION 

MARCH 30, 1981 

Pursuant to the foregoing warrant, the polls were opened at 6:00 A.M. with 
the reading of the warrant and the swearing in of the election workers present, 
The ballot boxes were inspected and found to be in working order, specimen 
ballots posted, voting list was displayed and instructions to the voters 
were posted. 

The following workers were assigned to their precincts: 
PRECINCT 1, 2, 3 & 4: Florence Roberts, Warden. 
PRECINCT 1. Mabelle Maguire, Clerk; John Ganley, Teller 
PRECINCT 2. Edna Hinkley, Clerk; Marion Bosselman, Teller 
PRECINCT 3. Anna Murphy, Clerk; Joanne Bussow, Teller 
PRECINCT 4. Nancy Franke, Clerk; Phyllis Ripley, Teller 

The polls were closed at 8:00 P.M. 

The total vote was 1522. There were 29 Absentee Ballots. 

After the counting and tabulation of the ballots, the results were: 

PRECINCT 

MODERATOR (one year) 

Ralph C. Copeland 
Blanks 

SELECTMAN (one year) 

Kenneth M. Chi Ids , Jr. 
Stephen W. Cook 



1 

236 

57 


2 

339 

78 


3 
363 

73 


4 

305 

71 


TOTAL 

1243 

279 


184 
25 


300 
20 


341 
19 


307 
11 


1132 
75 



143 







PRECINCT 








1 


2 


3 


4 


TOTAI 


Thomas Joseph Donovan 


74 


76 


60 


41 


251 


Blanks 


10 


21 


16 


17 


64 


LIBRARY TRUSTEE (two years) 












Patricia S. Kallio 


229 


338 


362 


315 


1244 


Blanks 


64 


79 


74 


61 


278 


PARK AND RECREATION COMMISSIONER (one year) 












Patricia A. Walsh 


103 


142 


123 


118 


486 


Warren E. Sheard 


163 


233 


271 


234 


901 


Blanks 


27 


42 


42 


24 


135 


TREASURER (three years) 












Edward F. Barrett, Jr. 


228 


335 


356 


307 


1226 


Blanks 


65 


82 


80 


69 


296 


ASSESSOR (three years) 












Melville J. Mills 


227 


352 


373 


324 


1276 


Blanks 


66 


65 


63 


52 


246 


SELECTMAN (three years) 












Robert J. Larkin 


212 


338 


342 


277 


1169 


Blanks 


80 


76 


■ 94 


99 


349 


Scattered 


1 


3 






4 


LIBRARY TRUSTEES (two years) (2) 












Doris Bergen Sponseller 


126 


142 


179 


149 


596 


David F. Temple 


147 


229 


234 


214 


824 


El izabeth L. Martin 


175 


233 


240 


206 


854 


Blanks 


138 


230 


219 


183 


770 


PARK AND RECREATION COMMISSIONERS (three yea 


rs) (3) 








Mary V. Gill is 


163 


235 


214 


202 


814 


Sandra Fitch 


177 


250 


283 


247 


957 


Paul B. Allen 


143 


194 


203 


176 


716 


Louise Mulock 


112 


97 


119 


108 


436 


Geraldine Y. Finn 


75 


167 


159 


155 


556 


Blanks 


209 


308 


330 


240 


1087 


SCHOOL COMMITTEE (three years) (2) 












W. David Stephenson 


185 


260 


282 


249 


976 


Laurence W. Aronstein 


138 


178 


227 


172 


715 


John T. Harney 


173 


241 


227 


213 


854 


Blanks 


89 


155 


136 


118 


498 


Scattered 


1 








1 


PLANNING BOARD (five years) 












Daniel W. Nye 


236 


334 


363 


316 


1249 


Blanks 


57 


82 


73 


60 


272 


Scattered 




1 






1 



The polls were closed at 8:00 P.M. 



144 



Tellers for counting the ballots: Mary Mair Etienne, Mabel le Maguire, 
Florence Roberts, Edna Hinkley, Marion Bosselman, Anna Murphy, Joan Bussow, 
Clara DeNucci , Nancy Franke, Phyllis Ripley, Ann Thompson, Linda Bohm, Beverly 
Smith, Nancy Munroe, Lennox Brodeur, Eleanor Anes , Eileen DeSorgher, Beth 
Cowen, Dorothy Cowen, Sheila Roy, Irene Roy, Barbara Armstrong and Douglas 
Armstrong. 

After the results were announced, the ballots checked, voting lists and tally 
sheets were turned over to the Town Clerk for safekeeping as prescribed by 
law. 

A true copy attest: 

Nancy J. ?n.a>ton 
TOWN CLERK 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
FOR THE TRANSACTION OF BUSINESS 

April 27, 1981 

The meeting was called to order by the Moderator at 7:40 P.M. at the Amos 
Clark Kingsbury High School Gymnasium after ascertaining that a quorum was 
present. Those present were invited to join in the Salute to the Flag, 
followed by the singing of the Star Spangled Banner. 

Following the reading of the service of the Warrant for the Meeting as 
well as a review of the procedural rules by the Moderator, the following 
action was taken on the Articles appearing in the Warrant: 

NOTE: The action taken on all articles will be recorded in their 
regular sequence regardless of the order on which they were 
voted. 

The meeting was briefly adjourned and a budget hearing for the use of 
Revenue Sharing Funds was held by the Selectmen. Recorded that $155,000 be 
used on the A155-00 Insurance Account and $83,588 be used for the con- 
struction of Well No. 5 as requested in Article 20 of the Adjourned Annual 
Town Meeting to be held April 28, 1981. Meeting recessed to take care of 
this business at 7:45 P.M. 

Meeting was reconvened at 7:50 P.M. 

CONSENT CALENDAR: In order to expedite town meeting proceedings a consent 
calendar was presented and VOTED as follows: 

VOTE: Voted unanimously that Articles 2, 4, 5, 16, 23, 24, 29, 30, 32, 
35 and 50 be passed as presented in the Warrant, with the ex- 
ception of Article 24 which was included in the motion at Town 
Meeting. 

VOTE: Voted unanimously to dismiss Articles 9, 10, 11, 12, 14, 15, 17, 
and 21 as presented in the Warrant. 

145 



ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to accept the reports of the several 
Town Officers for the past year. 

VOTE: Voted by Consent Calendar to accept the reports of the Town 
Officers for the past year. 

ARTICLE 3 was presented and the Moderator stated the individual budgets in 
this article would be reviewed and amended, however, this year because of 
Proposition 2h would not be voted until completion of Article 3 (which oc- 
curred on the following night, Tuesday, April 28, 1981). 

ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate and/or transfer from 
available funds sums of money requested by the Selectmen or any other Town 
Officer, Board, Commission and Committee to defray operating expenses of the 
Town for the fiscal year commencing July 1, 1981, or such other sums as the 
Town may determine as required by General Laws, Chapter 41, Section 108, or 
do or act anything in relation thereto. 

VOTE: Voted to raise and appropriate the following named sums of money 
to defray the departmental and other expenses of the Town for the 
fiscal year commencing July 1, 1981, as required by General Laws, 
Chapter 41, Section 108. 

100-01 Selectmen 
100 Personnel $ 2,050. 

200 Operations 4,437 . 

100-03 Executive Secretary 

100 Personnel 193,642. 

200 Operations 600. 

500 Equipment 0. 

194,242, 

100-04 Data Processing 

200 Operations 4,288. 4,288 



$ 6,487, 



(TOTAL 100-01, 03, 04 $205,017.) 



101-01 Town Counsel 



100 Personnel $ 12,000. 

200 Operations 1,281 . 



102-00 Treasurer 

100 Personnel $ 6,000. 

200 Operations 2,620. 



103-00 Tax Collector 

100 Personnel $ 6,000. 

200 Operations 8,285. 

500 Equipment 0. 



104-00 Town Clerk 

100 Personnel $ 6,000, 

200 Operations 855, 



146 



$ 13,281 



$ 8,620, 



$ 14,285, 



$ 6,855 



105-00 
100 
200 


Assessors 
Personnel 
Operations 








$ 2,250. 
18,530. 


$ 20,780, 


106-00 
200 


Planning 
Operations 








8,650 


8,650 


107-01 
100 
200 


Park & Recreation 

Personnel 

Operations 


Administration 


540. 
3,500. 


4,040 


107-02 
100 
200 
400 


Recreation 
Personnel 
Operations 
New Program; 








18,282. 

8,195. 

0. 


26,477 


107-03 
200 


Parks 
Operations 








6,850. 


6,850 






(TOTAL 


107-01, 


02, 03 


$ 37,367.) 




108-00 
100 
200 


Elections & 

Personnel 

Operations 


Registration 




1,082. 
8,055. 


9,137 


109-00 
100 
200 
500 


Town Hall 
Personnel 
Operations 
Equipment 








12,983. 

21,948. 

500. 


35,431 


110-04 
100 
200 
500 


Highway 

Personnel 

Operations 

Capital Expenditures 




176,017. 

70,000. 

1,000. 


247,017 



110-05 Sidewalks 

200 Operations 3,600. 3,600, 

110-06 Snow 

100 Personnel 

200 Operations 

500 Capital Expenditures 



110-07 Town Garage 

200 Operations 

110-08 Equipment Repair & Maintenance 

100 Personnel 

200 Operations 

300 Capital Expenditures 



35,000. 

54,400. 

5,500. 


94,900. 


10,050. 


10,050. 


33,903. 

53,240. 

0. 


87,143. 



147 



(TOTAL 110-04, 05, 06, 07, 08 $442,710) 

111-01 Police Department Administration 

100 Personnel $ 88,668. 

200 Operations 10,900. 

500 Equipment 0. 



111-02 Operations 
100 Personnel 
200 Operations 



111-03 Cruiser 
200 Operations 
500 Equipment 



111-04 Communications 



200 Operations 
500 Equipment 





$ 


99,568 


292,164. 
11,850. 




304,014 


23,100. 
0. 




23,100 


8,400. 
0. 







112-01 


Fire Department Administration 




100 

200 


Personnel 
Operations 


24,949. 
725. 


112-02 

100 
200 
500 


Fire Department Operations 

Personnel 

Operations 

Equipment 


43,731. 

14,300. 

6,360. 




(TOTAL 112-01, 02 


$90,065.) 


114-01 
200 


Mosquito Control 
Operations 


3,200. 


114-02 
100 
200 


Tree Care 
Personnel 
Operations 


9,630. 
1,000. 



8,400. 



111-05 Traffic Markings & Signs 

200 Operations 1,000. 1,000, 

111-06 School Traffic 

100 Personnel 14,464. 

200 Operations 300 . 

14,764, 

(TOTAL 111-01, 02, 03, 04, 05, 06 $450,846.) 



25,674 



64,391 



3.200. 



10,630. 



148 



114-03 Insect & Pest Control 



100 
200 


Personnel 
Operations 


$ 1,094. 
600. 


$ 1,694. 


114-04 
100 
200 


Dutch Elm 
Personnel 
Operations 


1,381. 
357. 


1,738. 




(TOTAL 114, 01, 02, 03, 


04 $17,262.) 




115-00 
100 
200 

500 


Inspection Department 
Personnel 
Operations 
Equipment 


18,382. 

2,520. 

0. 


20,902. 


119-00 
100 
200 


Sealer of Weights & Measures 

Personnel 

Operations 


428. 
200. 


628. 


120-00 
100 
200 
500 


Dog Officer 

Personnel 

Operations 

Capital Expenditures 


12,521. 

1,400. 

0. 


13,921. 


121-00 
200 

500 


Civil Defense 

Operations 

Equipment 


1,098. 
425. 


1,523. 


122-00 
200 


Board of Appeals 
Operations 


725. 


725. 


123-00 
200 


Street Lights 
Operations 


40,192. 


40,192. 


125-00 
100 
200 


Board of Health 

Personnel 

Operations 


3,866. 
6,637. 


10,503. 


125-01 
100 
200 


Outreach 
Personnel 
Operations 


14,820. 
800. 


15,620. 


126-00 
200 


Public Health Nurse 
Operations 


4,375. 


4,375. 


127-00 
200 


Garbage Disposal 
Operations 


0. 


0. 


128-00 
200 


Mental Health 
Operations 


5,470. 


5,470. 



149 



129-00 Ambulance 
100 Personnel 
200 Operations 



130-00 L andfill 

100 Personnel 

200 Operations 

500 Capital Expenditures 



131-01 Sewer Operations 
100 Personnel 
200 Operations 



132-01 Veterans 

100 Personnel 

200 Operations 

400 Benefits 



132-02 Grave Markers 
200 Operations 



$ 9,630, 
3,420, 



133-00 Memorial Day 

200 Operations 

134-00 Council on Aging 

200 Operations 

135-00 Library 

100 Personnel 

200 Operations 

400 Credits 

500 Equipment 



140-00 Water Department 

100 Personnel 

200 Operations 

400 New Services 

500 Equipment and Repairs 



145-00 Cemetery Commission 

100 Personnel 

200 Operations 

400 Credits 

500 Equipment 



146-00 Conservation Commission 
200 Operations 
400 Capital 





$ 13,050 


17,876. 

42,094. 

1,800. 


61,770 


55,925. 
65,854. 


121,779 


2,496. 
1,247. 
7,000. 


10,743 


0. 





450. 


450 


14,839. 


14,839 


43,794. 
23,061. 
(14,011.) 
0. 


52,844 


73,201. 

85,744. 

3,500. 

17,500. 


179,945 


14,000. 
3,500. 
(11,800.) 
800. 


6,500 


1,703. 
2,297. 





4,000, 



150 



147-00 Development & Industrial Commission 

200 Operations 

148-00 Historical Commission 

200 Operations 

150-01 Town Debt - Principal 

400 Other Charges 

150-02 Town Debt - Interest 

400 Other Charges 

(TOTAL 150-01, 02 $625,000.) 

155-00 Insurance 

200 Operations 375,900. 375,900' 



25. 


$ 25. 


540. 


540. 


425,000. 


425,000. 


200,000. 


200,000. 



160-00 Town Report 
200 Operations 4,500. 



161-00 County Retirement 

200 Other Charges " 218,479, 



** 



1000-00 S chool Administration 
100 Personnel 
200 Operations 



4,500, 



218,479. 



70,000 



162-00 Stabilization Fund 

200 Operations 0. 0. 

163-00 Reserve Fund 

200 Other Charges 70,000. 

170-00 Town Meeting 

100 Personnel 806. 

200 Operations 1,512. 

171-00 Warrant Committee 

200 Operations 

175-00 Personnel Board 

100 Personnel 

200 Operations 



180-00 Regional Vocational Technical School 
200 Operations 





2,318 


70. 


70 


612. 
150. 


762 


125,732. 


125,732 


138,168. 
20,423. 





158,591 



* 155-00-200 Transfer of $155,000 from the Revenue Sharing Fund and 
$220,900 to be raised on the Tax Levy. 

** SEE NEXT PAGE. 

151 



*2000-00 Instruction 

100 Personnel $ 3,577,251 

200 Operations 217,085 



** 



3000-00 Other School Services 
100 Personnel 
200 Operations 



**4000-00 Plant Operation & Maintenance 
100 Personnel 
200 Operations 



**7000-00 Acquisition of Assets 
200 Operations 

**9000-00 Programs with Other Systems 
200 Operations 

(TOTAL 1000, 2000, 3000, 4000, 7000, 9000 

8000-01 Vocational Education 





$ 3,794,336 


57,604. 




368,368. 






425,972 


288,757. 




533,573. 









822,330. 


12,742. 




12,742. 


96,500. 




96,500. 


$5,310,471.) 




11,005. 




11,005. 


ICLE 3 


$ 8, 


,684,887. 



400 Other Intergovernmental 



** Upon motion from the floor an amendment to not have all School Department 
budgets voted by line item (as are all other budgets) was not passed, 
116 Yes votes, 203 No votes. 

At 8:55 Annual Town Meeting recessed to go into Special Town Meeting. It 
was reconvened at 10:10 P.M. and then adjourned, during discussion of Article 
3, at 10:45 P.M. Adjourned Annual Town Meeting to be held the following 
night, Tuesday, April 28, 1981, at the same location convening at 7:30 P.M. 

A TRUE COPY ATTEST: 

Nancy J. Vntetovi 
TOWN CLERK 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

April 28, 1981 

Adjourned Annual Town Meeting reconvened on Tuesday, April 28, 1981, at the 
Amos Clark Kingsbury High School Gymnasium, after it was determined a quorum 
was present. 

ARTICLE 3 was voted in its entirety as presented. 



152 



SUMMARY OF APPROPRIATIONS - ANNUAL TOWN MEETING, APRIL 27, 1981 

Article Tax Levy Revenue Stab. Transfer 
Sharing Fund Available Funds 



Departmental et al Expenses $8,684,887 



*155,000. 
(*155-00 Insurance) 



TOTAL ARTICLE 3 $8,529,887. 

20. New Well, pumping station 116,000. 86,000. 168,003.78 

TOTALS $8,645,887. 155,000. 86,000.168,003.78 

ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town Treasurer with 
the approval of the Selectmen, to borrow money from time to time in antici- 
pation of the revenue of the financial year beginning July 1, 1981, in ac- 
cordance with the provisions of General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 4, and to 
issue a note or notes therefor, payable within one year, and to renew any 
note or notes as may be given for a period of less than one year in accordance 
with General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 17. 

VOTE: Voted unanimously to approve this article under the 
Consent Calendar. 

ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will authorize the Collector to use all means 
in the collection of taxes as the Treasurer might if elected to that office. 

VOTE: Voted unanimously to approve this article under the 
Consent Calendar. 

ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to fix the salary and compensation of 
the following elected officers: Moderator, Town Clerk, Treasurer, Selectmen, 
Assessors, School Committee, Trustees of the Public Library, Collector of 
Taxes, Park and Recreation Commission, Planning Board, Housing Authority, or 
do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

VOTE: Voted to approve the salaries of elected officials as 
set forth in the warrant as follows: 

Town Clerk $6,000. 

Tax Collector $6,000. 

Treasurer $6,000. 

Selectman, Chairman 700. 

Selectman, Clerk 675. 

Selectman 3rd member 675. 

Assessor, Chairman 750. 

Assessor, Clerk 750. 

Assessor, 3rd member 750. 

ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Personnel Administration 
Plan, effective July 1, 1981, to read as follows: 



153 



PERSONNEL ADMINISTRATION PLAN 
CLASSIFICATION OF POSITIONS AND PAY SCHEDULE 



SA LARIED POSITIONS 

P olice Department 

Police Chief 
Dog Officer 



Minimum 2nd Step 3rd Step 4th Step Maximum 



$19,129. 
12,521. 



S treets, Water and Sewer Department 

Superintendent 21,673. 

Fire Department 

Chief 17,363. 

Executive Departme nt 

Executive Secretary 20,871. 
Administrative Asst. 11,232. 

Board of Health 



$25,455. 
13,646. 



30,000. 



22,323. 



32,708. 
16,527. 



16,911. 



9.53 
5.72 
7.35 

Listed below is a 13-grade, 5-step structure, in which all hourly graded 
positions are slotted. 

Grade * 

1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 
10 
11 
12 
13 

*Lower rates as authorized by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts may also be 

paid. 

**The minimum per season for Lifeguard Instructor (PTT) shall be $908. 



Detached Social 
Worker 


13 


,412. 




HOURLY POSITIONS 








Library 








Library Director 
Assistant Librarian 
Children's Librarian 




6.92 
4.62 
5.34 


8.42 
5.15 
6.70 



3.38** 


3.62 


3.67 


3.83 


4.04 


3.60 


3.78 


3.97 


4.15 


4.33 


3.89 


4.04 


4.23 


4.45 


4.71 


4,23 


4.40 


4.54 


4.80 


5.10 


4.30 


4.54 


4.80 


5.04 


5.30 


4.40 


4.71 


4.98 


5.21 


5.65 


4.98 


5.30 


5.65 


5.95 


6.26 


5.53 


5.89 


6.21 


6.53 


6.96 


5.89 


6.21 


6.53 


6.96 


7.34 


6.21 


6.53 


6.85 


7.28 


7.69 


6.36 


6.78 


7.20 


7.62 


8.03 


6.78 


7.20 


7.62 


8.03 


8.52 


8.55 


8.75 


8.95 


9.15 


9.35 



154 



The minimum per season for Lifeguard (PTT) shall be $755. 
SPECIAL RATE/FEE POSITIONS 
Part Time/Temporary 



Animal Inspector 
Waterfront Director 
Asst. Waterfront Director 

Deputy Collector 
Assistant Dog Officer 

Ambulance E.M.T. (PTT) 

Fire 

Deputy Chief 

Captain 

Lieutenant 

Clerk 

Playground Director 

Police Intern 

Recreation Coordinator 

Registrar 

Registrar, Clerk 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 

Town Counsel 

Tree Climber 

Veterans' Agent 

Inspectors 

Inspector of Buildings 

Local Inspector of Buildings 

Gas Inspector 

Acting Gas Inspector 

Plumbing Inspector 

Acting Plumbing Inspector 

Wiring Inspector 

Acting Wiring Inspector 

Health Agent 

Street Inspector 

Zoning Enforcing Officer 

or do or act anything in relation thereto, 



$690. per year 

$1,968. to $2,569. per year 

$122. to $168. per week 

$1,059. minimum per season 

Fee 

$303. per year and $5.65 per hour 

when on duty 

$8.03 per hour 



$1,046. per year 




$351 . per year 




$266. per year 




$266. per year 




$137. to $208. per week 




$150. to $196. per week 




$101. to $122. per week 




$200. per year 




$482. per year 




$428. per year 




$9,302. to $15,862. per 


year 


$4.30 to $6.96 per hour 




$2,496. per year 




$9.95 per inspection 




Annual minimum $1 ,926. 




Annual minimum $257. 




Annual minimum $532. 




Annual minimum $95. 




Annual minimum $1,573. 




Annual minimum $361 . 




Annual minimum $875. 




Annual minimum $257. 




$9.95 per inspection 




$5.22 per hour 




$9.95 per inspection 





(Personnel Board) 



VOTE. Voted to approve the Classification of Positions and 
Pay Schedules of the Personnel Administration Plan as 
set forth in the Warrant. 

*Additional positions Police Officers and Sergeants rates voted at Special 
Town Meeting. 

ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Cemetery Commission 
to appoint one of its members as Cemetery Foreman and one of its members as 
Cemetery Laborer at the salary set out in the Personnel Administration Plan, 



155 



or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Cemetery Commissioners) 

VOTE: Voted to authorize the Cemetery Commission to appoint 
one of its members as Cemetery Foreman and one of its 
members as Cemetery Laborer at the salary set out in 
the Personnel Administration Plan for the respective 
positions. 

ARTICLE 9. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of 
money for the purpose of purchasing equipment for the Street, Water and Land- 
fill Departments as listed, and authorize the Selectmen to trade as part of 
the purchase price, equipment to be replaced. 

To be Acquired Department Trade 

1. Pickup Truck Water 1976 G.M.C. Pickup 

2. Pickup Truck Street 1976 Dodge Pickup 

3. Dump Truck (2nd hand) Landfill 1966 White 

4. Plows (2) Underslung Street None 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Streets, Water & Sewer Department) 

VOTE: Voted unanimously to dismiss this articl.e under the 
Consent Calendar. 

ARTICLE 10. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate funds available under 
the provisions of Chapter 570 of the Acts of 1980 for the purpose of resurfac- 
ing Hartford Street from Dover town line southwesterly for a distance of 
thirteen hundred and ten (1,310) feet and authorize the Selectmen to enter in- 
to any and all contracts necessary therefor, or do or act anything in relation 
thereto. 

(Streets, Water & Sewer Department) 

VOTE: Voted unanimously to dismiss this article under the 
Consent Calendar. 

ARTICLE 11. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of 
money for the purpose of reconstructing a sidewalk on the easterly side of 
Miller Street from Main Street southerly, a distance of one hundred and sixty 
(160) feet or, do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Streets, Water & Sewer Department) 

VOTE: Voted unanimously to dismiss this article under the 
Consent Calendar. 

ARTICLE 12. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of 
money for the purpose of installing a drain in South Street from Station 69 
to Station 77+50 (near Clark Road), or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Streets, Water & Sewer Department) 

VOTE: Voted unanimously to dismiss this article under the 
Consent Calendar. 



156 



ARTICLE 13. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of 
money for the purpose of reconstructing North Street between Frairy Street 
and Station 17+00 (400 feet northerly of Green Street) and to authorize the 
Selectmen to enter into any and all contracts necessary for said purpose; and 
to authorize the Selectmen to apply for reimbursement from the State under the 
provisions of Chapter 570 of the Acts of 1980 and Chapter 329 of the acts of 
1980, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Streets, Water & Sewer Department) 

VOTE: Voted that the Board of Selectmen be authorized to 

accept and enter into any contract for the expenditure 
of funds allotted by the Commonwealth for the reconstruction 
of North Street between Frairy Street and Station 17+00 
400 feet northerly of Green Street. 

ARTICLE 14. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate funds available under 
the provisions of Chapter 510 of the Acts of 1980 for the purpose of resurfac- 
ing North Street between Pine Street and Dale Street for a distance of approx- 
imately six hundred and twenty (620) feet, and to authorize the Selectmen to 
enter into any and all contracts necessary therefor, or do or act anything in 
relation thereto. 

(Streets, Water & Sewer Department) 

VOTE: Voted unanimously to dismiss this article under the 
Consent Calendar. 

ARTICLE 15. To sse if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of 
money for the purpose of contructing a sidewalk on Spring Street (Route 27) 
from Curve Street southerly for a distance of approximately five hundred (500) 
feet to the new entrance to St. Edward's Church and to install storm drainage 
in connection with said sidewalk, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Streets, Water & Sewer Department) 

VOTE: Voted unanimously to dismiss this article under the 
Consent Calendar. 

ARTICLE 16. To see if the Town will vote to accept as a public way the 
following named streets, or parts thereof: 

Jefferson Way from Station 0+25 to 4+62.53 
Garry Drive from Station 15+37.11 to 22+63.21 
Hummingbird Way from Station 0+0 to 3+98.10 
Oriole Road from Station 0+23.75 to 12+50.55 

as laid out by the Board of Selectmen and as shown on plans referred to in the 
Order of Layout on file with the Town Clerk's office and to authorize the 
Board of Selectmen to acquire by eminent domain or otherwise, such rights, 
titles and easements, including drainage easements, as may be necessary to 
accomplish such purposes, or take any other action relative thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

VOTE: Voted unanimously to accept this article under the 
Consent Calendar. 

ARTICLE 17. To see what sum the Town will vote to raise and appropriate to 
purchase and install a water meter at Metacomet Park, or do or act anything 

157 



in relation thereto. 

(Park and Recreation Commission) 

VOTE: Voted unanimously to dismiss this article under the 
Consent Calendar. 

ARTICLE 18. To see what sum the Town will vote to raise and appropriate for 
the construction of a section of fence along Curve Street at Metacomet Park 
extending from the existing fence approximately 100 feet toward Pleasant 
Street, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Park and Recreation Commission) 

VOTE: Voted to dismiss this article. 

ARTICLE 19. To see if the Town will vote to advise the Great and General 
Court not to appropriate for Fiscal Year 1982 more than it did for Fiscal Year 
1981 for expenditures by the Commonwealth's departments and agencies. Further, 
that the savings of approximately $350,000,000 from the above cuts be redis- 
tributed to the cities and towns in the form of increased local aid, or take 
any action relative thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

VOTE: Voted unanimously to advise the Great and General Court 
not to appropriate for fiscal year 1982 more than it did 
for fiscal year 1981 for expenditures as' set forth in this 
article in the warrant, and further that the savings of 
approximately $350,000,000 from the above cuts be redis- 
tributed to the cities and towns in the form of increased 
local aid. 

ARTICLE 20. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money and 
determine in what manner the funds shall be raised for the purpose of con- 
structing a well, pumping station and associated equipment and mains in ac- 
cordance with the provisions of Article 20 of the Annual Town Meeting of 1980, 
or take any other action relative thereto. 

(Water and Sewerage Board) 

VOTE: Voted unanimously that the following sums be transferred: 

$1,087.61 from the balance appropriated for Data Processing 
under Article 31 of the Annual Town Meeting of 1974, $74.14 
from the balance appropriated for repairs to Baker's Pond 
under Article 33 of the Annual Town Meeting of 1975, $270.56 
of the balance appropriated for fixing up the area in front 
of the Town Hall under Article 29 of Annual Town Meeting of 
1975, the balance of $9,700.00 appropriated for the con- 
struction of a sewer in Harding Street under Article 17 of 
the Special Town Meeting of November 3, 1975, $3,954.80 
balance from the appropriation for water mains connecting 
the Elm Street Wells to High Street voted under Article 6 of 
the Special Town Meeting of November 22, 1965, the balance 
of $1,521.21 from the appropriation for water mains in High 
Street from Forest Street to Plain(s) Street and in Plain(s) 
Street voted under Article 7 of the Special Town Meeting of 
November 22, 1965, the balance of $2,706.98 from funds voted 



158 



for laying water mains in High Street southerly from the 
junction at Plain(s) Street voted under Article 18 of the 
Special Town Meeting of November 22, 1965, $61,718.89 from the 
appropriation for water mains in Hummingbird Lane and Granite 
Street, Lakewood Drive and Stagecoach Road appropriated under 
Article 21 of the Annual Town Meeting of 1978, $83,588.54 
balance from the appropriation for construction of a well and 
pumping station appropriated under Article 8 of the 1974 
Annual Town Meeting, the balance of $186.07 from the appropria- 
tion for creating a municipal parking area behind the Town 
Hall as voted under Article 28 of the Annual Town Meeting of 
1974, $1,500.00 the balance appropriated for the re-publica- 
tion of Tilden's History of Medfield voted under Article 38 of 
1975 Annual Town Meeting, the balance of $1,694.98 from the 
funds voted for the bi-centennial celebration under Article 
37 of the Annual Town Meeting of 1975, $86,000 from the stabi- 
lization fund and that the sum of $116,000 be raised on the 
1982 fiscal year tax levy for development of an additional 
well field off High Street, and for a well and pumping station 
equipment and to acquire any rights and easements in land 
necessary for that purpose, by purchase, eminent domain or 
otherwise and that these transfers and this appropriation on 
the tax levy, totaling $370,003.78, be used instead of borrow- 
ing under General Laws Chapter 44 Section 8 (5) as voted pur- 
suant to Article 14 of the Special Town Meeting of May 5, 1980, 

ARTICLE 21. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate and/or 
borrow and/or transfer from available funds a sum of money for the purpose of 
constructing sewers pursuant to design plans prepared under the authorization 
of Article 26 of the 1975 Annual Town Meeting, and to see if the Town will 
authorize the Water and Sewerage Board and/or the Board of Selectmen to enter 
into any contracts necessary for the purpose of this article and to apply for 
and receive State or other funds for said purpose, or do or act anything in 
relation thereto. 

(Water and Sewerage Board) 

VOTE: Voted unanimously to dismiss this article under the 
Consent Calendar. 

ARTICLE 22. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate and/or 
borrow and/or transfer a sum of money for the purpose of replacing the water 
main in Bridge Street between Main Street and West Street with a twelve (12) 
inch main and to authorize the Water and Sewerage Board to enter into any and 
all contracts necessary therefor, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Water and Sewerage Board) 

VOTE: Voted to dismiss Article 22 as set forth in warrant. 

ARTICLE 23. To see if the Town will vote to rescind $114,300 from the bond- 
ing authorization voted under Article 26 of the 1 97 5 Annual Town Meeting (in- 
terceptors for the sewer system), or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

VOTE: Voted unanimously to accept Article 23, as set forth in the 
warrant, under the Consent Calendar. 

159 



ARTICLE 24. To see if the Town will vote to set the Town Clerk's fees under 
the provisions of Chapter 262, Section 34 of the Massachusetts General Laws 
as follows : 

(1) For filing and indexing assignment for the benefit of 

creditors. $ 5.00 

(11) For entering amendment of a record of the birth of an 
illegitimate child subsequently legitimized. 5.00 

(12) For correcting errors in a record of birth. 5.00 

(13) For furnishing certificate of birth. 3.00 
(13A) For furnishing an abstract copy of a record of birth. 2.00 

(14) For entering delayed record of birth. 5.00 

(20) For filing certificate of a person conducting business 

under any title other than his real name. 10.00 

(21) For filing by a person conducting business under any 
title other than his real name or statement of change 
of his residence, or of his discontinuance, retirement 
or withdrawal from, or of a change of location of such 

business. 5.00 

(22) For furnishing certified copy of certificate of person 
conducting business under any title other than his real 
name or a statement by such persons of his discontinuance, 
retirement or withdrawal from such business. 3.00 

(24) For recording the name and address, the date and number of 
the certificate issued to a person registered for the 
practice of podiatry in the Commonwealth. 10.00 

(29) For correcting errors in a record of death. 5.00 

(30) For furnishing a certificate of death. 3.00 
(30A) For furnishing an abstract copy of a record of death. 2.00 

(38) For issuing and recording license to Junk Dealers. 100.00 
(38A) For issuing and recording license to Junk Collector. 50.00 

(39) For issuing and recording Pawnbrokers License. 100.00 

(42) For entering notice of intention of marriage and issuing 
certificate thereof. 10.00 

(43) For entering certificate of marriage filed by persons 

married out of the commonwealth. 3.00 

(44) For issuing certificate of marriage. 3.00 
(44A) For furnishing an abstract copy of a record of marriage. 2.00 

(45) For correcting errors in a record of marriage. 5.00 
(54) For recording power of attorney. 5.00 

(57) For recording certificate of registration granted to a 
person to engage in the practice of optometry, or issuing 

a certified copy thereof. 10.00 

(58) For recording the name of the owner of a certificate of 
registration as a physician or osteopath in the commonwealth. 10.00 

(62) For recording order granting locations of poles, piers, 
abutments or conduits, alterations or transfers thereof, 
and increase in number of wires and cables or attachments 
under the provisions of Section 22 of Chapter 166. Additional 
fee for each street or way included in such order. 

Flat rate 25.00 
Additional Fee 5.00 

(66) For examining records or papers relating to birth, 
marriage or deaths upon the application of any person, 

the actual expense thereof, but not less than 5.00 

(67) For copying any manuscript or record pertaining to a 

birth, marriage or death. 3.00 

(69) For receiving and filing of a complete inventory of all 

items to be included in a "closing out sale" etc. (per page) 2.00 
(75) For filing a copy of written instrument or declaration of 

160 



trust by the trustees of an association or trust, or 

any amendment thereof as provided by Section 2, Chapter 

182. $ 10.00 

(78) For recording deed of lot or plot in a public burial 

place or cemetery. 5.00 

(79) Recording any other documents - per page 5.00 

- each additional page 2.00 

and under the provisions of Chapter 140, Section 202 of the Massachusetts 
General Laws as follows: 

(37) For issuing and recording licenses to keepers of 

intell igence offices 25.00 

(40) For issuing and recording licenses to keepers of 

billard saloons, pool or sippio rooms or tables, bowling 
alleys, etc. - 1st table or alley 30.00 

- each additional 15.00 

Voter's card 2.00 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Town Clerk) 

VOTE: Voted unanimously to accept the above article under the 
Consent Calendar. 

ARTICLE 25. To see if the Town will vote to amend Article I. TOWN MEETINGS 
of the Town By-laws as follows: 

Section 1. by changing the wording of the first sentence so that it reads as 
follows : 

"The Annual Town Meeting for the election'of officers and other matters 
as may be voted on the official ballot shall be held on the last Monday 
in March, each year, and the annual meeting for the transaction of 
business shall be held on the last Monday in April of each year." 

Section 2. by changing the wording to read as follows: 

"Notice and warning of all Annual Town Meetings shall be given by attested 
copies of the warrant calling the same in not less than five (5) public 
places in the Town at least seven (7) days before the time of holding the 
meeting. Notice and warning of Special Town Meetings shall be given by 
posting attested copies of the warrant calling the same in not less than 
five (5) public places in the Town at least fourteen (14) days before the 
time of holding such meeting." 

Section 4. paragraph 2 by changing the first sentence to read as follows: 

"The number of voters necessary to constitute a quorum at any town meeting 
shall be one hundred (100) provided that a number less than a quorum may 
from time to time adjourn the same." 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Codification Committee) 

The meeting was adjourned during the discussion of this article and this 
article will be brought up as first article on meeting to be held at the Dale 
Street School, Monday, May 4, 1981. Meeting adjourned at 10:50 P.M. 



161 



A True Copy Attest: 

Nancy J. ?n.nA>tovi 
Town Clerk 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

May 4, 1981 

The Adjourned Annual Town Meeting reconvened at 7:48 P.M. at the Dale Street 

School after ascertaining a quorum was present. The meeting continued with 

the discussion of Article 25 as presented on April 28, 1981, and vote was 
taken as follows: 

VOTE: Voted unanimously to amend Article 1. TOWN MEETINGS of 
the Town By-laws as follows: Sections 1 and 2 as set 
forth in the Warrant and with the exception that Section 
4 was dismissed. 

Prior to the vote a Tribute to William E. McCarthy, Superintendent of Streets, 
Water and Sewer, who died on Sunday, May 3rd at the age of 61, having served 
as Superintendent for 25 years and as Selectman, the youngest elected, for a 
three year term, was delivered by past Selectman Harry A. Kelleher. Mr. 
Kelleher spoke of Mr. McCarthy's dedication to the Town and his wealth of 
history, which cannot be replaced. 

ARTICLE 26. To see if the Town will vote to amend Article II. TOWN ADMINI- 
STRATION AND FINANCE of the Town By-laws as follows: 

Section 1. by changing the wording to read as follows: 

"A Warrant Committee of nine (9) members shall be appointed by the 
Moderator; three of whose members shall be appointed each year for three 
(3) year terms. It shall recommend the annual town budget for vote by the 
town meeting and fulfill all duties of a finance committee as required by 
general law. It shall hold a public hearing — not less than thirty days 
prior to the annual town meeting for transaction of business to be held 
on the last Monday in April to inform the residents of the town of its 
proposed recommendations and to hear testimony and argument before publi- 
cation of its final recommendations. This hearing shall be attended by 
all elected and appointed town officers, unless they are deterred by ill- 
ness or other reasonable cause, except that chairman of boards, com- 
missions and committees may represent the remaining members." 

md by adding a paragraph to read as follows: 

"Immediately upon drawing the warrant for a Town Meeting, the Selectmen 
shall transmit a copy of the same to each member of the Warrant Committee. 
Not less than two weeks prior to the Town Meeting for the transaction of 
business to be held on the last Monday in April, the Selectmen shall dis- 
tribute to the households of the Town a Warrant Report containing an ex- 
planation of each article by its petitioner and a recommendation by the 
Warrant Committee. A Warrant Report shall be prepared in like manner by 
the Board of Selectmen for each Special Town Meeting and may be placed in 
distribution to the households of the town at any time before the Special 
Town Meeting." 



162 



Section 4. by changing the title "Board of Water Commissioners" to "Water and 
Sewerage Board." 

Section 8. By substituting the word "landfill" for "as a free public dump" in the 
first sentence and for "dump" in the last sentence. A further sentence shall be 
added as follows : 

"the Selectmen may set such fees and charges for the use of the landfill as are 
permitted by law." 

Section II. by changing the wording to read as follows: 

"The financial year shall begin with the first day of July in each year and end 
with the last day of June following." 

Section 15. By deleting the entire section having to do with departmental expendi- 
tures between the 31st day of December in each year and the Annual Town Meeting, 
and by changing the numbering of Sections 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23 to read 
15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21 and 22 respectively. 

Section 20. (renumbered Section 21.) by changing the fifth sentence to read as 
follows: 

"The bids, as received, shall be deposited in a receptacle securely locked and 
at the time and place shall be publicly opened in the presence of the board, 
committee, or officers authorized by the Town to make the contract or the 
Executive Secretary or Administrative Assistant of the Board of Selectmen when 
authorized by the respective board, committee, or officer." 

and the last sentence of the section amended to read: 

"All professional service contracts entered into by any town department, board, 
or commission shall be summarized in the next annual town report." 

Section 21. (renumbered Section 22.) by changing the wording to read as follows: 

"Every contract exceeding Two Thousand Dollars ($2,000) shall be accompanied by 
a suitable bond for the performance of the same, or by the deposit of money or 
security to the amount of such a bond. Unless required by Massachusetts Genere i 
Laws, the awarding authority may waive this requirement." 

Section 22. (renumbered Section 23.) by changing the wording to read as follows: 

"Town boards, committees, officers and departments may dispose of personal 
property having a value of One Thousand Dollars ($1,000) or less belonging to 
the Town with the approval of the Board of Selectmen when the property is no 
longer needed by the Town." 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Codification Committee) 

VOTE: Voted to approve Article 26 as set forth in the Warrant with the 
exception of deletion of that part of Section 8 which reads as 
follows : 

163 



A further sentence shall be added as follows: 

"The Selectmen may set such fees and charges for the use of the 
landfill as are permitted by law." 

ARTICLE 27. To see if the Town will vote to amend Article III. TOWN OFFICERS to 
read as follows : 

Section 8. by changing the wording to read as follows: 

"All bills, payrolls, vouchers, cancelled notes and other evidence of indebt- 
edness of the Town which have been paid from the treasury, shall be properly 
filed and safely kept for such period of time as the Selectmen shall determine 
from time to time, and as may be required under State regulation." 

Section 9. by deleting this section pertaining to the contents of the Town 
Treasurer's Annual Report. 

Section 10. by renumbering this section to number 9. and 9 (a). 

Section 11. by deleting the section pertaining to the Collector of Taxes listing 
all unpaid tax levies, including the name and amount due from each party assessed. 

By changing the numbering of sections 12, 13 and 14 to read 10, 11 and 12 respec- 
tively, 
or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Codification Committee) 

VOTE: Voted to accept Article 27 as set forth in the Warrant with the 
exception of deletion in Section 8 of Article III. TOWN OFFICERS 
of Town By-laws so it reads as follows: 

"All bills, payrolls, vouchers, cancelled notes and other evidence of 
indebtedness of the Town which have been paid from the treasury, shall 
be properly filed and safely kept for such period of time as may be 
required under State regulation." 

ARTICLE 28. To see if the Town will vote to amend Article IV POLICE REGULATIONS of 
the Town By-laws as follows: 

By inserting a paragraph after the title of the Article as follows: 

"Whoever violates any section of this article shall be punished by a fine not 
exceeding Two Hundred Dollars ($200) for each offense, which shall inure to the 
Town. Such fines shall be recovered by indictment or on complaint before a 
district court or by non-criminal disposition in accordance with Massachusetts 
General Laws." 

Section 3. by deleting in its entirety this section pertaining to permitting 
animals to go at large. 

Section 4. by renumbering this section to number 3. 

Section 5. by deleting this section pertaining to throwing injurious substances on 

164 



publ ic ways or places. 

By changing the numbering of sections 6, 7, 8, 9 and 10 to read 4, 5, 6, 7 and 8 
respectively. 

Section 8. (renumbered section 10.) by changing the wording to read as follows: 

"No person or persons shall play or perform on any musical instrument, sing, 
parade, hold a public meeting, make a public address, march or congregate in 
any public way or public place, except in connection with a funeral, or in 
connection with rights constitutionally granted, without a written permit from 
the Board of Selectmen." 

Section 11. by deleting this section pertaining to depositing litter on the streets 

By renumbering sections 12, 13, 14, 15, 16 and 17 to read 9, 10, 11, 12, 13 and 14 
respectively. 

Section 10. (renumbered section 13.) by changing the first sentence to read as 
follows : 

"Loitering-(a) Whoever continues to stand, sit or loiter in, or about any 
street, sidewalk or any public place so as to obstruct the free passage of 
travellers or vehicles thereon, after being directed by a police officer to 
move on or disperse shall be punished by a fine not exceeding Two Hundred 
Dollars ($200). 

Section 11. (renumbered section 14.) by changing the last sentence to read as 
follows : 

"Any person violating any of the provisions of this by-law shall be punished 
by a fine of not more than Two Hundred Dollars ($200) for each offense." 

Section 18. by deleting this section pertaining to driving vehicles over any hose 
pipe placed in the street by the Fire Department. 

By renumbering sections 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24 and 25 to read 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 
20 and 21 respectively. 

Section 26. by deleting the section pertaining to Dog Control. 

By renumbering sections 27 and 28 to read 22 and 23. 

Section 23. Public Drinking (renumbered section 28.) (a) by changing the first 
sentence to read as follows: 

"Whoever shall, within the limits of any public way located within the town, 
whether that public way be a town way, county highway, state highway, or a 
private way open to the public, consume intoxicating beverages, or open any 
container of alcoholic beverages with the intent of consumption, shall be 
punished by a fine not exceeding Two Hundred Dollars ($200). 

(b) by changing the first sentence to read as follows: 

"Whoever shall consume any intoxicating beverages, or open any container of 

165 



alcoholic beverages with the intent of consumption, in any public building, or 
on any public property, including parks, cemeteries, school houses and school 
grounds, and public squares shall be punished by a fine not exceeding Two 
Hundred Dollars ($200). 

Section 24. Unregistered Motor Vehicles (previously unnumbered) by adding to 
Article IV as Section 24, the unregistered motor vehicles by-law adopted June 28, 
1965 as follows: 

"No person, other than one holding a license under the provisions of the General 
Laws, Chapter 140, shall permit a disabled and unregistered motor vehicle, or 
parts thereof, to remain on his or her property for more than three (3) weeks 
unless permission to do so has first been given in writing by the Board of 
Selectmen after an investigation by the Board of Health and a written certifi- 
cation by them that the same does not constitute a hazard to the public health 
as a harboring place for insects and rodents, This by-law shall not apply to 
the storage of motor vehicles or parts thereof inside buildings. 

By rescinding the vote taken pursuant to Article 4 of the Special Town Meeting of 
October 27, 1969. and by adding to Article IV of the By-laws the following section 
25. 

"Police officers shall man the ambulance whenever possible and if off duty shall 
be considered on duty when manning the ambulance as provided in Massachusetts 
General Laws, Chapter 41, Section II IF." 

Section 26. To repeal the by-law adopted by the Town pursuant to Article 2 of the 
Special Town Meeting of December 11, 1972 and by inserting as Article 26 of Article 
IV the following: 

"Transient Persons. No transient person shall solicit funds for charitable, 
veteran or fraternal purposes or solicit subscriptions for periodicals or shall 
solicit purchase orders and deposits for restoration or permanent preservation 
of personal articles of intrinsic value or photographs or portraits within the 
Town of Medfield without first having obtained a permit from the Board of 
Selectmen. 

Application for said permit shall be filed with the Board of Selectmen on forms 
provided by the Town. Immediately upon receipt of an application, the Board of 
Selectmen shall hold a public hearing on said application at their next meeting. 
Notice of the purpose of said hearing shall be posted on the principal bulletin 
board of the Town. Within five hours of the conclusion of said hearing, the 
Board of Selectmen shall issue the permit, with such restrictions, conditions 
and limitations as they find necessary for the protection of the applicant and 
the citizens of the Town, unless they shall find that the applicant or appli- 
cants or their employees or agents are of a bad moral character or that the 
issuance of said permit will result in danger to the public safety or creation 
of a nuisance, 
or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Codification Committee) 

VOTE: Voted to amend Article IV POLICE REGULATIONS of the Town By-laws 
as set out in the Warrant except that an added Section 25 shall 
read as follows : 

166 



"If police officers are called upon to man the ambulance when they are 
off-duty, they shall be considered to go on-duty when manning the ambulance 
as provided in Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 41, Section 111 F . " 

ARTICLE 29. To see if the Town will vote to repeal Article V PUBLIC CARRIAGES of 
the Town By-laws, as presently written and will vote to insert as Article V STREET 
NUMBERING, the Street Numbering By-law adopted by the Town, March 16, 1967, or do 
or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Codification Committee) 

VOTE: Voted unanimously to approve Article 29, as set forth in the 
Warrant, under the Consent Calendar. 

ARTICLE 30. To see if the Town will vote to repeal Article VI TRAFFIC REGULATIONS 
of the Town By-laws, as presently written and will vote to insert as Article VI the 
Snow Removal By-law adopted by the Town September 6, 1950, as follows: 

"Any vehicle interfering with plowing of snow or removing ice from any way may 
be removed by the Superintendent of Streets or other officer having charge of 
ways to some convenient place, including in such term a public garage, the cost 
of such removal and of the storage charge, if any, shall be imposed upon the 
owner of such vehicle." 
or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Codification Committee) 

VOTE: Voted unanimously under the Consent Calendar that the By-laws 

be amended by repealing Article VI TRAFFIC REGULATIONS as presently 
written and that the snow removal By-law adopted September 6, 1950 
be inserted as Article VI as printed in the Warrant. 

ARTICLE 31. To see if the Town will vote to amend Article VII DOG CONTROL of the 
Town By-lavs as follows: 

Section 3. Penalty. (A) by deleting the language presently in the by-law and add- 
ing the following language: 

"Fines shall be assessed at the maximum amount provided by state law." 
and by adding Section 5. License Fee as follows: 

"Section 5. License Fee. 

"The license fee shall be One Dollar ($1.00) in addition to the maximum amount 
permitted by state law." 

(Codification Committee) 

VOTE: Voted to amend Article VII DOG CONTROL of the Town By-laws 
to read as foil ows : 

Section 3. Penalty. 

(A) Fines in calendar year 

-0- 1st offense 
$25. 2nd offense 

167 



$30. 3rd offense 

$50. 4th and subsequent offenses 

and adding Section 5. License Fee as follows: 

Section 5. License Fee. 

The License fee shall be One Dollar ($1.00) in addition to the 
maximum amount permitted by state law, 

ARTICLE 32. To see if the Town will vote to rescind the vote taken pursuant to 
Article 3 of the warrant for the Special Town Meeting of May 19, 1952 establishing 
an Inspector of Wires and the vote pursuant to Article 1 of the Special Town Meet- 
ing of June 1, 1944 establishing a curfew, or do or act anything in relation thereto, 



VOTE 



(Codification Committee) 

Voted under the Consent Calendar to rescind the vote taken 
pursuant to Article 3 of the warrant for the Special Town 
Meeting of May 19, 1952 establishing an inspector of Wires 
and also the vote taken pursuant to Article 1 of the Special 
Town Meeting of June 1, 1944 establishing a curfew. 

ARTICLE 33. To see if the Town will vote to accept Section 26C of Chapter 148 of 
the Massachusetts General Laws requiring that apartment houses containing six or 
more dwelling units, hotels, boarding or lodging houses, or family hotels be equip- 
ped with automatic smoke or heat detectors in each dwelling unit and each hallway 
floor, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Fire Chief & Inspector of Buildings) 

VOTE: Voted to accept Section 26C of Chapter 148 of the Masschusetts 
General Laws as set forth in the Warrant. 

ARTICLE 34. To see if the Town will vote to accept Section 26E of Chapter 148 of 
the Massachusetts General Laws requiring that all buildings or structures occupied 
in whole or in part for residential purposes be equipped with approved smoke de- 
tectors within one year from the date of such acceptance, or do or act anything in 
relation thereto. 

(Fire Chief & Inspector of Buildings) 

VOTE: Voted to accept Section 26E of Chapter 148 of the Massachusetts 
General Laws as set forth in the Warrant. 

ARTICLE 35. To see if the Town will vote to allow the School Committee to dispose 
of obsolete chairs, desks, tables, and books; all items will be offered for public 
sale with those unsold to be discarded without compensation, or do or act anything 
in relation thereto. 

(School Committee) 

VOTE: Voted under the Consent Calendar to allow the School Committee 
to dispose of obsolete furniture and items as set forth in the 
Warrant. 



168 



ARTICLE 36. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Medfield Zoning Map by ex- 
tending the BI District as it presently exists along the northeast side of North 
Street in a southwesterly direction along said North Street to a point on the north- 
east side of North Street, 66.39 feet northwest of the intersection of Janes Avenue 
and North Street for a depth of one hundred and twenty (120) feet back from North 
Street, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Planning Board) 

VOTE: Voted unanimously to amend the Medfield Zoning Map by extending 

the BI District as it presently exists as set forth in the Warrant. 

Meeting adjourned at 10:45 P.M. to be reconvened at the Dale Street Gym on Tuesday, 
May 5, 1981 at 7:30 P.M. 

A TRUE COPY ATTEST: 

Uanu; J. ?n.2Atovi 
TOWN CLERK 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

Tuesday, May 5, 1981 

Adjourned Annual Town Meeting reconvened at the Dale Street Gym, on Tuesday, 
May 5, 1981 at 8:30 P.M. after it was established a quoroum was present. 

ARTICLE 37. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Medfield Zoning Map by clianc ■ 
ing from RT to BI that area bounded as follows: 

Beginning at a stone bound on the northerly side of Hospital Road at Station 
64+29.16 as shown on a plan entitled "HOSPITAL ROAD, MEDFIELD between the en- 
trance to Medfield State Hospital and Harding Street as made by the Norfolk 
County Commissioners by return dated March 17, 1964"; thence northwest in a 
straight line to the southwest corner of a parcel shown as lot 81 Longmeadow 
Road on a plan entitled. "Harding Estates Subdivision Plan of Land in Medfield, 
Massachusetts dated June 10, 1963 recorded with Norfolk Registry of Deeds as 
plans numbered 990-1007 of 1963, plan book 215"; thence northerly along the 
boundary of the property of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts Department of 
Mental Health to the Dover town line; thence westerly along the Dover town 
line to the Charles River; thence southerly slong the Charles River and the 
property line of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts Department of Mental Health 
to Hospital Road; thence easterly along Hospital Road to the point of beginning 
or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Planning Board) 

VOTE: Voted to amend Medfield Zoning Map as follows: 

Delete in line 9 the clause reading "thence northerly 
along the boundary of the property of the Commonwealth 
of Massachusetts, Department of Mental Health to the Dover 
town line;" and replace it with the following wording: 

169 



"thence westerly 150 feet N 89° 59 ( 27" W to a point; thence 
northerly by a line parallel to and 150 feet westerly of the 
property line of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Department 
of Mental Health, to the Dover town line;" so it will read as 
follows : 

Beginning at a stone bound on the northerly side of Hospital 
Road at Station 64+29.16 as shown on a plan entitled "HOSPITAL 
ROAD, MEDFIELD between the entrance to Medfield State Hospital 
and Harding Street as made by the Norfolk County Commissioners 
by return dated March 17, 1964"; thence northwest in a straight 
line to the southwest corner of a parcel shown as lot 81 Long- 
meadow Road on a plan entitled, "Harding Estates Subdivision 
Plan of Land in Medfield, Massachusetts" dated June 10, 1963 
recorded with Norfolk Registry of Deeds as plans numbered 990-1007 
of 1963, plan book 215"; thence westerly 150 feet N 89° 59" 27" W 
to a point; thence northerly by a line parallel to and 150 feet 
westerly of the property line of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
Department of Mental Health, to the Dover town line; thence 
westerly along the Dover town line to the Charles River; thence 
southerly along the Charles River and the property line of the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts Department of Mental Health to 
Hospital Road; thence easterly along Hospital Road to the point 
of beginning. 

YES 250 
NO 8 

ARTICLE 38. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Medfield Zoning Map by addinc 
to Section 5 . Use Regulations the following: 

5.5 AGRICULTURAL DISTRICT 

Agricultural land is an important resource to the Town of Medfield, serving the 
public interest through its visual, economic, traditional, ecological and food pro- 
ducing benefits. 

5.5.1 Purposes 

The purpose of the Agricultural District is to preserve land well suited 
to agriculture and to encourage commitment of such land to agricultural use. 

5.5.2 Definitions 

5.5.2a) The Agricultural District is shown on the Zoning Map of the Town of 
Medfield. 

5.5.2b) Agricultural Use: For the purposes of Section 5.5, land shall be deemed 
to be in agricultural use. 

1) When primarily used in raising beef cattle, dairy cattle, poultry, 

swine, sheep, horses, ponies, goats or bees, for the purpose of selUnt 
such animals or a product derived from them in the regular course of 
business, or when incidently used in a related manner which represents 
a customary or necessary use in raising such animals and preparing 

170 



them or the products derived therefrom for market, and/or 

2) When primarily used in raising fruits, vegetables, grains, berries, 
nuts and other foods for human consumption, feed for animals, flowers, 
trees, forest products, and nursery or greenhouse products for the 
purpose of selling such products, in the regular course of business, 
or when used incidentally in a related manner which represents a 
customary and necessary use in raising such products and preparing 
them for market. 

5.5.3 Use 

5.5.3a) The primary use of land in the Agricultural District shall be agricultural. 

5.5.3b) The construction or placement of buildings or structures, except as pro- 
vided in Section 5.5.3c; and the removal, excavation or dredging of loam, 
peat, gravel, soil, rock or other mineral substance in such manner as to 
adversely affect the land's overall future agricultural potential; and 
other acts or uses detrimental to such retention of the land for agricul- 
tural use shall be prohibited. 

5,5.3c) Construction of a one-family or two-family dwelling for the farmer, his 

family and his employees shall be allowed on a lot exceeding ten acres in 
area in the Agricultural District, and shall not derogate from the purpose 
of the District. Such dwellings shall comply with the dimensional regula- 
tions of the RS District. The maximum area devoted to residential use on 
any lot shall be 30,000 square feet, 

5.5.3d) Construction of buildings for year-round retail sales of farm products 

raised primarily on the premises shall be allowed in the Agricultural Dis- 
trict. Site Plan Approval by the Planning Board shall be required for all 
such construction exceeding 500 square feet in area. The area devoted to 
retail sales and parking on any lot shall be a maximum of 20,000 square 
feet, shall meet the yard and height requirements of the RS District, and 
shall meet the parking requirements of Section 8 of Medfield's Zoning By- 
law. Signs shall meet Business District requirements. 

5.5.3e) Construction or placement of temporary (not exceeding a period of three 

consecutive months) structures for the retail sale of products raised pri- 
marily on the premises and for housing seasonal agricultural employees shall 
be permitted in the Agricultural District, and shall meet the yard and 
height requirements of the RS District. Signs shall meet Business District 
requirements. 

5.5.3f) Placement of all other agricultural structures except fences shall be a 
minimum of 50 feet from any adjacent zoning district, and shall meet the 
front yard requirement of the nearest adjacent district. 

and by adding to DEFINITIONS: 

"2.1.0 Agricultural Use - (See Section 5. 5,2b)" 

and by adding to 6.2 TABLE OF AREA REGULATIONS the following: 



171 



Under Zoning District, "A"; under Use, "Any permitted structure or 
principal use"; under Area, "10 acres"; under Frontage, Width, Depth, 
Front, Side and Rear, "(See Section 5.5.3c-f)" 

and by adding to Section 5 USE REGULATIONS under 5.4 TABLE OF USE 
REGULATIONS: 

an additional column headed "A" 

and by adding after Line 2, Section 6.2.1., after the word "elderly" 
the word 

"agricultural use" 

and by adding at the end of Section 13.2.1: 

"and those areas used for retail sales in the Agricultural 
District." 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Planning Board) 

VOTE: Voted unanimously to amend the Medfield Zoning By-law as printed 
in the Warrant with the exception of Section 5.5.3b where commas 
replace semi-colons, and Section 5.5.3f which was amended on the 
floor to read as follows: 

5.5.3f) Placement of all other agricultural structures except 
fences shall be a minimum of 50 feet from any adjacent 
zoning district, and shall meet the front yard require- 
ment of the nearest adjacent district. 

and by adding to DEFINITIONS: 

2.1.0 Agricultural Use - (See Section 5.5.2b) 

and by adding to 6.2 TABLE OF AREA REGULATIONS as printed 
in Warrant after deletion of clause: 

"under Use, "Any permitted structure or principal use"; 
under Area, "10 acres"; under Frontage, Width, Depth, 
Front, Side and Rear," 
so it will read as follows: 

Under Zoning District, "A"; "(See Section 5.5.3c-f)" 

and by adding to Section 5 USE REGULATIONS under 5.4 TABLE 
USE REGULATIONS : an additional column headed "A" 

and by adding after Line 2, Section 6.2.1, after the word 
"elderly" the word 

"agricultural use." 

and by adding at the end of Section 13.2.1: 
"and those areas used for retail sales in the 

172 



Agricultural District." 

ARTICLE 39. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Medfield Zoning Map by adding 

"A - AGRICULTURAL DISTRICT "; 1.) bounded on the north and west by the Charles 
River, bounded on the east, southeast, northeast and southeast again by the 
present IE District, easterly by land of the Town of Medfield, northerly by 
Hospital Road and easterly by property of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
Department of Mental Health, to the point of beginning at the Charles River; 
and 2.) beginning at a stone bound on the northerly side of Hospital Road at 
Station 64+29.16 as shown on a plan entitled, "HOSPITAL ROAD, MEDFIELD be- 
tween the entrance to Medfield State Hospital and Harding Street as made by the 
Norfolk County Commissioners by return dated March 17, 1964"; thence northwest 
in a straight line to the southwest corner of a parcel shown as lot 81 Long- 
meadow Road on a plan entitled "Harding Estates Subdivision Plan of Land in 
Medfield, Massachusetts dated June 10, 1963 recorded with Norfolk Registry of 
Deeds as plans numbered 990-1007 of 1963, Plan Book 215"; thence east, south, 
east, south, west, and south by the present boundary line of property of the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts Department of Mental Health; thence west along 
Hospital Road to the point of beginning, or do or act anything in relation 
thereto. 

(Planning Board) 

VOTE: Voted unanimously to amend the Medfield Zoning Map as printed in 
the Warrant. 

ARTICLE 40. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning Bylaw by deleting 
Section 13.7 "Corner Lot Condition" in its entirety and by changing Section 13.8.6 
to read "In a Business (B), Business-Industrial (B-I) or Industrial (I-E) District, 
no freestanding sign shall be located nearer any property line than the permitted 
setback distance for a building on the same lot.", or do or act anything in relation 
thereto. 

(Planning Board) 

VOTE: Voted unanimously to amend the Zoning Bylaw as printed in 
the Warrant. 

ARTICLE 41. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning Bylaw by deleting 
Section 8 . 3 . 6 . g ) and 8.3.6.h) as they presently read and by adding a "new Section 
8.3.6.g), "or any site having one means of access or egress, the width of the 
driveway shall not be less than 24 feet. For any site having a separate entrance 
or exit, the driveway shall not exceed 20 feet in width, except for a suitable cur- 
vature at the entrance.", and a new Section 8.6.3.h), "Each parking space shall be 
marked with a (3) three-inch wide (minimum) solid painted line on each side and 
along the full depth. Paint shall be white or yellow Traffic Paint as specified for 
pavement markings in Standard Specifications for Highways and Bridges , the Common- 
wealth of Massachusetts Department of Public Works." or do or act anything in re- 
lation thereto. 

(Planning Board) 

VOTE: Voted unanimously to amend the Zoning By-law as printed in the 
Warrant with the exception of substitution of word "and" in 

173 



place of "or" in line three and in line six, so amendment reads 
as follows: (Lines three and five below-) N.J. P. 

To amend the Zoning By-law be deleting Section 8.3.6.g) and 
8.3.6.h) as they presently read and by adding a new Section 
8.3.6.g), "For any site having one means of access and egress, 
the width of the driveway shall not be less than 24 feet. For 
any site having a separate entrance and exit, the driveway shall 
not exceed 20 feet in width, except for a suitable curvature at 
the entrance,", and a new section 8.6 .3 . h) , "Each parking space 
shall be marked with a (3) three-inch wide (minimum) solid 
painted line on each side and along the full depth. Paint shall 
be white or yellow Traffic Paint as specified for pavement 
markings in Standard Specifications for Highway and Bridges , the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts Department of Public Works.". 

ARTICLE 42. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Medfield Zoning By-law by 
changing Section 2.1.36 " Parking Space " to read as follows, "An off-street space 
having an area of not less than 9'6" x 18', plus access and manuevering space, for 
exclusive use as a parking stall for one motor vehicle whether inside or outside a 
structure." or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Planning Board) 

VOTE: Voted unanimously to amend the Medfield Zoning By-law as 
printed in the Warrant. 

ARTICLE 43. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to 
enter into a lease agreement and/or sell for the purpose of preserving the structure 
of the former St. Edward's Church located on the Medfield Assessors' maps as lot 
132, map 43, and such land as necessary, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Petition and Board of Selectmen) 

VOTE: Voted to authorize the Board of Selectmen to lease for a term 
of more than five years or sell the former St. Edward's Church 
building located on Lot 132 on Map 43 of the Medfield Assessors' 
maps and so much of the lot as they find necessary for a price 
not less than $35,000. and that they be instructed to make as a 
condition of any such lease or sale that the external appearance 
of the building must be preserved. 

ARTICLE 44. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money for the pur- 
pose of making repairs to the former St. Edward's Church building and to secure the 
building as may be necessary, or take any other action relating thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

VOTE: Voted to dismiss this article as presented in the Warrant. 

ARTICLE 45. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money and deter- 
mine in what manner said funds shall be raised to demolish the former St. Edward's 
Church building and provide necessary landscaping and/or site improvements, or 
take any other action relative thereto. 

(Library Trustees) 

174 



VOTE: Voted if no lease of the St. Edward's Church building or 
purchase and sales agreement is reached by the Board of 
Selectmen as authorized by the vote pursuant to Article 43 of 
this warrant by December 31, 1981, the Board of Selectmen be 
directed to obtain bids for demolition of the former St. Edward's 
Church building and for improving the lot and report to the next 
town meeting thereafter. 

ARTICLE 46. To see if the Town will vote to instruct the Board of Selectmen to. 
order street lights on the following named poles: 

Hilltop Circle - Pole No. 83/1 
Westview Road - Pole No. 6 
or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Petition) 

VOTE: Voted to dismiss this article as presented in Warrant. 

ARTICLE 47. To see if the Town will vote to install a street light to illuminate 
the intersection of Green Street and Flint Locke Lane. The street light shall meet 
current State illumination standards. 

(Petition) 

VOTE: Voted to dismiss this article as presented in Warrant. 

ARTICLE 48. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money for the 
partial support of the South Middlesex Consumer Protection Office, which appropria- 
tion shall be calculated according to the following formula: 

$10,000. Commonwealth of Massachusetts 

The remaining $14,000 roughly divided in thirds: 

1/3 each Town in the District equally; ($4,140.), 

1/3 each Town in the District according to population ($4,950.): 

1/3 each Town in the District according to usage during the previous 

calendar year; ($5,000.) 

The fee from the Town of Medfield would be $455: 

said appropriation being submitted to each Town under a parallel Article to this 

same effect; or take any action relative thereto. 

(Petition) 

VOTE: Voted to dismiss this article 

ARTICLE 49. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Assessors to use 
a sum of money from Free Cash in the Treasury for the reduction of the Fiscal 1982 
Tax Rate, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Assessors) 

VOTE: Voted that the Board of Assessors be authorized to use $284,032 

from Free Cash in the Treasury for the reduction of the Fiscal 1982 
tax rate. 



175 



ARTICLE 50. To see if the Town will vote to accept the following named sums as 

Perpetual Trust Funds for the care of lots in the Vine Lake Cemetery, the interest 

thereof as may be necessary for said care, viz: 

Claire and Henrietta Fillatreau $400 

Edward and Anita Daniels 400 

John and Genevieve Gleason 300 

Jeffrey and Wendy Cohen 200 

Gordon and Blanche Jackson 100 

Herman and Rita Erichsen 100 

Dwight and Sally Adams 200 

John and Mary Ann 0' Mai ley 100 

Donald and Lillian Lee 200 

Leon and Susan Cobb 200 

Julian and Madeline Hastings 200 

Michael and Jean Brady 200 

Stewart and Dorothy Dewar 200 

Florence Roberts 100 

Charles A. Nutting 100 

Herbert Spaulding 200 

John and Irene Gattoni 400 

John and Laura Magnuson 200 

Anna Donlan 100 

VOTE: Voted unanimously by consent calendar to accept this article as 
set forth in the warrant. 

The Annual Town Meeting was dissolved at 10:30 P.M. 

A TRUE COPY ATTEST. 

Nancy J. VnoAton 
Town Clerk 



Articles 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 30, 31, 32, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41 and 42 declared 
approved by Town Clerk Nancy J. Preston on August 18, 1981 due to the fact 
the Attorney General failed to act within the 90 days allowed by law. 



176 



TOWN OF MEDFIELD 

WARRANT FOR SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 

APRIL 27, 1981 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
Norfolk ss. 

To either of the Constables of the Town of Medfield in the County of Norfolk 
GREETING. 

In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, you are hereby directed to 
notify and warn the inhabitants of said Town, qualified to vote in elections and in 
Town affairs, to meet at the Amos Clark Kingsbury School in said Medfield on Monday 
the twenty-seventh day of April next, at 9:00 o'clock P.M. then and there to act on 
the following articles: 

ARTICLE 1. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Personnel Administration Plan 
Classification of Positions and Pay Schedule, SALARIED POSITIONS , Police Department 
Police Sergeant and Police Officer, which presently reads as follows: 

SALARIED POSITIONS 



Police Department 


Minimum 


2nd Step 


3rd Step 


4th Step 


Maximum 


Police Sergeant 
Police Officer 


$15,204 
12,373 


$15,837 
13,241 


$14,259 




$16,633 
15,204 



or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Collective Bargaining Team) 

VOTE: Voted to amend the Personnel Administration Plan, Classification of 
Positions and Pay Schedule, SALARIED POSITIONS , Police Department , 
Police Sergeant and Police Officer as follows: 

SALARIED POSITIONS 



Police Department 




Minimum 2nd Step 


3rd Step 4th Step Maximum 


Pol ice Sergeant 
Police Officer 




$16,268 $16,946 
13,239 14,168 


$17,797 
$15,257 16,269 


and 


to 


amend Section XV SPECIAL PAY PROVISIONS by adding Sect 



as follows: 

G. Police Officers: For all regularly scheduled shifts starting 
after 3:00 p.m. and finishing prior to 8:00 
a.m., a nightly shift differential of 75t per 
shift will be paid, said sum to be paid an- 
nually during the month of December. 



177 



ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Personnel Administration Plan, 
XI VACATIONS by making the following changes so that the section will read as 
follows: 

Delete "Calendar" from the title of paragraph 2, so that it reads: 

"Subsequent years. " 

and by adding a paragraph after the schedule of vacation days as follows: 

"Eligibility will be as of January 1st of each year, except on the 
5th and 10th year anniversary date when additional days earned will 
be granted on anniversary date, with the exception of members of the 
uniformed Police Department, who are covered by the provisions of the 
Massachusetts General Laws." 

and by eliminating the final paragraph and substituting therefor: 

"Vacation days accrue monthly to be taken in the subsequent year, 
except in the case of retirement and termination of employment when 
the employee shall be paid ror all accrued vacation through the 
termination date." 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Personnel Board) . 

VOTE: Voted to amend the Personnel Administration Plan, XI VACATIONS 
as set forth in the Warrant. 

ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will vote to transfer a sum of money from available 
funds to the Street Lighting 123-00, 200 Account, or do or act anything in relation 
thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

VOTE: Voted to transfer from Free Cash the sum of $10,000 to the 
Street Lighting 123-00, 200 Account. 

ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to transfer a sum of money from available 
funds to the 111-02 Police Operations, 100 Personnel account, or do or act anythinq 
in relation thereto. 

(Pol ice Department) 

VOTE: Voted to transfer a sum of $5,954 to the 111-02 Police Operations, 
100 Personnel account, and that to defray this expense the follow- 
ing sums be transferred as designated: 

$2,000. from 129-00, 100 Ambulance account 
204. from 111-03, 500 Cruiser account 
500. from 111-06, 100 School Traffic account 

2,000. from 111-04, 200 Communications account 

1,250. from Free Cash 



178 



ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from available funds a sum of 
money to defray the cost of a Gypsy Moth Spray or do or act anything in relation 
thereto. 

(Insect Pest Control Superintendent) 

VOTE: Voted to transfer from Free Cash the sum of $8,455 to defray 

the cost of a Gypsy Moth Spray, to the Insect Pest Control 114-03, 
200 account. 

ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to sell 
the 1974 Chevrolet Dog Van, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Police Department) 

VOTE: Voted to authorize the Selectmen to sell the 1974 Chevrolet 
Dog Van. 

ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to amend Article VIII, Council on Aging 
Bylaw, Section 2, to read as follows: 

"The Board of Selectmen shall appoint the Counc'il on Aging consisting of 
five (5) members, in such manner that no more than two terms shall expire 
in any one year. The members of the Council shall serve without pay." 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Council on Aging) 

VOTE: Voted to change membership of the Council on Aging from 9 to 5 
members as set forth in the Warrant. 

ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will vote to amend Article VII of the Bylaws, DOG 
CONTROL , Section l.A by eliminating the first clause and substituting the following 
language: 

"The Board of Selectmen shall appoint an Animal Control Officer. It shall 
be the duty of the Animal Control Officer to cause dogs to be impounded for 
any of the following causes." 

and by deleting Section 4 . Definitions. B. which defines "on call" or do or act 
anything in relation thereto. 

(Police Chief) 

VOTE: Voted to amend the Town Bylaws Article VII DOG CONTROL as set 
forth in the Warrant. 

ARTICLE 9. To see if the Town will vote under and pursuant to authority granted in 
General Laws, Chapter 40D, Section 21 (g), as amended, to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen to negotiate a contract subject to Town Meeting approval with the owner 
or operation of solid waste disposal facilities to be established in the Town of 
Plainville for the disposal of refuse, garbage and waste and for the use of re- 
covered energy and materials resulting from the operation of such facilities, 
which contract will : 

179 



(1) be for a term of twenty years or less: 

(2) include provisions for the delivery of minimum amounts of refuse, garbage 
and waste and payments for the use of the facilities to be based thereon: 

(3) provide for unit prices that will be graduated and for adjustments thereof 
and for the use of steam electricity and recovered materials resulting 
from the use of facilities and for credits or payments to the Town result- 
ing therefrom: 

(4) allow the use by the Town or other municipalities or private parties of 
the uncommitted capacity of such facilities: 

(5) contain other provisions incidental and related to the foregoing general 
matters: and 

(6) be generally in the form of proposed contract negotiated by representatives 
of the member communities of the 128 West Resourse Recovery Council with 
such changes therein as may be negotiated by said Council and approved by 
said Board of Selectmen. 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

VOTE: Voted to dismiss this article. 

ARTICLE 10. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Water and Sewerage Board 
to enter into a contract with the Town of Dover to dispose of septage at the Town of 
Medfield Wastewater Treatment Plant, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Water and Sewerage Board) 

VOTE: Voted to authorize the Water and Sewerage Board to enter into a 
contract with the Town of Dover to dispose of septage at the Town 
of Medfield Wastewater Treatment Plant. 

ARTICLE 11. To see if the Town will vote to transfer a sum of money from available 
funds to the Regional Vocational School 180-00, 200 Operations account, or do or 
act anything in relation thereto. 

(Regional Vocational School District) 

VOTE: Voted to transfer the sum of $5,263 from Free Cash to the 
Regional Vocational School 180-00, 200 Operations Account. 

VOTED unanimously to dissolve this Special Town Meeting at 10:10 P.M. 

A TRUE COPY ATTEST: 

Nancy J. Vn.u>toYi 
Town Clerk 

Articles seven (7) and eight (8) were declared approved by Town Clerk Nancy J. 
Preston on August 18, 1981 due to the fact the Attorney General failed to act with- 
in the 90 days allowed by law. 



180 



FINANCIAL REPORTS 
TOWN OF MEDFIELD 



FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31 , 1981 



BOARD OF ASSESSORS 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 

and Residents of the Town of Medfield 

To comply with existing laws and regulations it is necessary for 
municipalities to up-date all of their assessed values, both taxable and 
non-taxable, to Full and Fair Cash Value again in 1982-83. 

This is neither a simple nor inexpensive procedure and, with others, 
we bemoan the work and expense involved. We have no choice, however, but 
to expend both. The cost of this work, to be undertaken during fiscal 
1981-82, is $15,000 in addition to the amount budgeted for annual records' 
maintenance, adjusting property values in accordance with building permits 
and land splits. 

1981 has been both busy and, at times, frustrating for the Assessors. 
The 1980 revaluation was fully implemented and, in general, met with good 
acceptance townwide. It did, however, identify a few areas which will 
need further adjustments. 

Additional work is now required to code all properties in compliance 
with the new classification regulations established this year by the 
Department of Revenue. Although the codes will have no impact on property 
values or taxes, they will be beneficial at a later date when we must 
establish total values by property use. 

The required maintenance of all assessments at Full and Fair Cash 
Value has given the Assessors cause to consider the merits of retaining 
a full, time assistant or deputy assessor. It is obvious that a part time 
assistant can no longer handle the work load of this office. The Board 
believes that an assistant assessor should be able to keep assessments at 
Full and Fair Cash Value bi-annually, reducing the use and cost of most 
other outside appraisal consultants. 

Many other towns in the Commonwealth have come to this conclusion 
and the number employing full time professional assistants is growing. 
Although Medfield' s annual argument is being heard again "this is going to 
be a bad year and new positions should be deferred", the Board is asking 
for an appropriation and an amendment to the Personnel By-laws for just 
such a position, It is our belief that postponement is a luxury we cannot 
afford. 

Under Chapter 58, Section 17 of the General Laws, Medfield has been 
receiving approximately $176,771.20 per year for the loss of taxes on state 
owned land. Since much of this land has been taken by the U.S. Army Corps 
of Engineers for flood control and much of the balance falls within the 
new Agricultural District approved at the 1981 Annual Town Meeting, the 
Assessors anticipate a decrease in this payment. At the maximum, 
agricultural land is valued at $200.00 per acre. 



182 



Approximately 45 percent of Medfield's total land area is exempt or sub- 
ject to tax deferral. Heretofore we have been reimbursed at the rate of 
$74.00 per thousand dollars of value. As of this printing, the rate is only 
$59.00 per thousand as a result of revaluation throughout the state. This 
will reduce the estimated return in cash to the Town of Medfield for State 
owned land to $140,939.00, a loss in income of $35,832. A new appraisal will 
include the units of value for the restrictions and limited use of property, 
predicting the exact loss in revenue for the coming years. 

Many vacant land parcels in Medfield have been rendered unbuildable for 
practical purposes by zoning amendments. Some of these parcels are larger 
than neighboring parcels long since built upon. In their present condition 
as non usable lots, the assessors can sustain only nominal assessments for 
them, which represents a tax loss. In order to bring greater value to these 
parcels, making them taxable favorably for the town, the Assessors have pro- 
posed an amendment to the zoning by-laws for town meeting action this year. 

Our customary report is as follows. 



Appropriations 

Amount for Tax Title 

Amount for Final Court Judgment 

Offsets 

Debt & Interest 



$9,084,562.78 

3,000.00 

5,846.77 

16,152.00 

177,796.35 



$9,287,357.90 



State Assessments 231,820.42 

County Assessments 130,399.00 

Overlay 77,407.38 

Estimated Receipts & Available Funds 3,757,570.21 
Net Amount to be Raised 



9,726,984.70 
5,969,514.49 



Real Property Valuations 
Personal Property Valuations 
Total Property Valuations 



236,600,500.00 
5,07 6,200.00 



241,676,700.00 



Tax Rate 

Real Property Tax 

Personal Property Tax 

Total Taxes Levied on Property 



24.70 

5,844,130.81 
125,383.68 



5,969,514.49 



Sewer Betterments 

Water Betterments 

Water Lien 

Sewer Lien 

Water Service Lien 

Septic Waste Disposal Lien 



35,645.94 

1,686.40 

17,494.48 

5,804.18 

114.44 

650.00 



Respectfully submitted, 

MUvUle. J. \kWU> 
Roqza R. HaAdy 
Jo*2.pk S. Kznnzdy 

BOARD OF ASSESSORS 



183 



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185 



TOWN TREASURER 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

STATEMENT OF CASH 

Cash in Banks December 31, 1980 $ 289,874.42 

Receipts 1981 - Including Investments 39,559,868.82 
Disbursements 1981 - Including Investments (39,229,597.60 ) 

Cash in Banks December 31, 1981: $ 620,145.64 

Checking $ 337,061.29 
Savings 4,411.06 

Pooled Investments 174,875.65 

Federal Revenue Sharing 103,797.64 

Fund - Certificate 

STATEMENT OF INVESTMENTS 

General Fund $ 2,124,842.69 

Stabilization Fund 164,853".24 

Investments December 31, 1981 $ 2,289,695.93 

Total Cash, Savings and Investments $ 2,909,841.57 

December 31, 1981 

STATEMENT OF INTEREST EARNED ON SAVINGS/INVESTMENTS 

Available Funds $ 198,137.02 
Stabilization Fund 21,209.62 
Federal Revenue Sharing Funds 12,642. 63 

Interest earned and received 1981 $ 231,989.27 
Interest earned but not received 1981 23,448.56 

Total Interest Earned 1981 $ 255,437.83 

STATEMENT OF FEDERAL REVENUE SHARING FUNDS 

Total Cash December 31, 1980 - Including $ 15,361.01 

Savings/Investments 

Distribution received 1981 151,042.00 

Interest received on Savings/Investments 198 1 12,642.63 

Total Cash December 31, 1981 - Including $ 179,045.64 

Savings/Investments 



186 



The foregoing report shows the changes in the cash balance and invest- 
ments for the twelve month period ended December 31, 1981. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Edi/jaAd F. BaAAeJX, 3n.. 
Town Treasurer 

OUTSTANDING DEBT ACCOUNTS 

June 30, 1981 

Net Funded or Fixed Debt $ 3,380,000.00 

Outside Debt Limit: 

Dale Street School Addition $ 50,000.00 

Elementary (Intermediate) School 350,000.00 

Elm Street (Wheelock) School 680,000.00 

Sewers - Longmeadow 225,000.00 

Street Sewers & Construction 1,510,000.00 2,815,000.00 

Inside Debt Limit: 

Noon Hill Land Acquisition 180,000.00 

Police Station Construction 175,000.00 

Sewers - Charles River Interceptor 210,000.00 565,000.00 



TRUST AND INVESTMENT ACCOUNTS 

Balance June 30, 1981 507,451.31 

Funds in Custody of Town Treasurer: 

Li brary : 

Granville F. Dailey Trust $ 76,374.20 

Library Trust Funds 11,653.50 
Library Trust Income Account 3,875.00 

Cemetery Perpetual Care 99,720.00 

Stabilization Fund 171,232.88 

Conservation Fund 2,258.73 

Retirement Fund 127,166.18 492,280.49 

Funds in Custody of Selectmen: 

Moses Ellis Post #117 G.A.R. 9,090.97 

Medfield Antiquities Trust 4,165.28 

Tri-Centennial Trust 625.64 13,881.89 

Funds in Custody of School : 

Essay Fund Account 1,288.93 



187 



TOWN ACCOUNTANT 



GENERAL LEDGER ACCOUNTS 



June 30, 1981 



ASSETS 



Cash in Banks and Office 
Cash 
Investments 



$ 282,358.24 
2,060,000.00 



$2,342,358.24 



Accounts Receivable: 

Personal Property Taxe; 
Levy of 1980 
1981 



592.07 
3,501.51 



4,093.58 



Real Estate Taxes: 






Levy of 1975 


22.32 




1976 


98.40 




1977 


1,117.97 




1978 


3,489.14 




1979 


17,460.62 . 




1980 


45,578.03 




1981 


229,873.81 


297,640.29 


Motor Vehicle Excise Taxes: 






Levy of 197 8 


1,146.92 




1979 


3,297.14 




1980 


7,089.50 




1981 


29,905.43 


41,438.99 


Water: 






Liens Added to Taxes 






Levy of 197 9 


314.88 




1980 


365.40 




1981 


621.74 




Water Services 


2,007.78 




Water Rates 


56,807.77 


60,117.57 



Special Assessments: 
Water Betterments: 
Levy of 1978 

1979 

1980 

1981 
Committed Interest - Water 
Unapportioned Sewer Assessment 
Sewer Betterments: 
Levy of 1978 

197 9 

1980 

1981 



395.41 
182.74 
182.74 
365.92 
1,035.63 
186,407.05 

358.93 

299.78 

2,346.25 

1,395.95 



Committed Interest - Sewer 

Tax Titles 

Ambulance Accounts Receivable 

Police Off Duty Detail 

Sewer : 

Septic Waste Disposal Fees 

Sewer Usage Charge 

Sewer Liens Added to Taxes 1981 

Aid to Sewer 

Aid to Highways 

Underestimates to be Raised: 

Metropolitan Air Pollution Control 
Norfolk County Mosquito Control 
County Tax 

Loans Authorized : 

Street Sewers, Art. 23 

Street Sewers, Art. 9 

Street Sewer Design 

Well #5, Art. 14, STM 1980 

Mt. Nebo Water Tower, Art. 15, STM 1980_ 

Unprovided for : 
Land Takings 



$ 5,495.97 

22,094.37 

17,815.87 

82.55 

1,440.00 

18,997.48 

95.46 

874,655.00 

80,446.00 



329.51 

1,867.88 

12,294.87 



2,200,000.00 

5,000,000.00 

114,300.00 

370,000.00 

1,250,000.00 



518.53 



$ 198,466.37 

22,094.37 

17,815.87 

82.55 



20,532.94 

874,655.00 
80,446.00 

14,492.26 

8,934,300.00 
518.53 



TOTAL ASSETS 



$12,909,052.56 



LIABILITIES AND RESERVES 



Temporary Loans: 

In Anticipation of Federal and State Aid 

Premium on Loans 

State and County Assessments: 
State Parks and Reservations 
Metropolitan Bay Transportation Authority 
County Hospital Tax 

Payroll Deductions: 
Group Insurance 
School Annuities 
Norfolk County Retirement Fund 
Teachers Retirement System 

Guarantee Deposits: 
Planning Board 



$ 225,000.00 



225.00 



670.14 
576.23 
556.57 



11 


,721, 


,86 




329 


.29 


8 


,796, 


,49 


1 


,182, 


6] 



$ 225,000.00 



225.00 



17,244.80 



1,802.94 



22,030.25 



17,244.80 



189 



Agency: 

County Dog Licenses $ 408.7 

Tailings: 

Unclaimed Checks 2,737.46 

Group Insurance Trust 58,285.87 

Trust Fund Income: 

Cemetery 30,438.06 

Library 3,554.85 

Luke Memorial Trust 229.06 

Federal Grants: 

Titles, I, III, IV, VIB 25,171.36 

Occupational Education 10,931.22 

Special Federal Grant: Occupational Education 506.89 

Federal Grant PL 94482 (378.57) 

Special Federal Grant: Ambulance 1,000.00 

Federal Revenue Sharing Entitlements 92,689.28 



Private Grants: 

Revolving Funds : 
School Cafeteria 
School Athletics 
Custodian Detail 
Adult Education 
Police Off Duty Detail 
Park Commission 

Appropriation Balances 

Loans Authorized but Unissued 

Cemetery Perpetual Care 

Reserve Fund - Overlay Surplus 

Overlays Reserved for Abatements 
Levy of 1973 
1975 
1976 
1977 
1978 
1979 
1980 
1981 

Revenue Reserved Until Collected 

Motor Vehicle Excise 

Special Assessment 

Tax Title and Possession 

Special Tax Revenue 

Departmental 

Water Revenue 

Sewer Revenue 



8,977.97 

1,928.47 
263.21 
(300.36) 
( 62.95) 
(2,475.75) 
4.38 

768,945.97 

,934,300.00 

21,680.00 

4,194.09 



51.50 

50.20 

1,620.22 

8,376.96 

3,220.08 

24,701.56 

8,089.33 

38,977.98 



41,438.99 
198,466.37 
22,094.37 
2,437.07 
17,815.87 
60,117.57 
20,532.94 



408.70 

2,737.46 
58,285.87 

34,221.97 



129,920.18 
8,977.97 



(643.00) 

768,945.97 

934,300.00 

21,680.00 

4,194.09 



85,087.83 



190 



Aid to Sewer Revenue $ 653,411.00 $ 

Police Off Duty Detail Revenue 82.55 

Aid to Highway Revenue 80,446.00 1,096,842.73 

Warrants Payable 156,869.93 156,869.93 

Surplus Revenue 1,340,919.87 1,340,919.87 

TOTAL LIABILITIES $12,909,052.56 



191 



RECEIPTS 
For the Period of July 1, 1980 - June 30, 1981 

Balance Cash on Hand July 1, 1980 

General $ 179,559.85 

Federal Revenue Sharing 71,719.61 $ 251,279.46 

Taxes : 

Real Estate and Property Tax 6,532,204.75 

Payments in Lieu of Taxes 175,383.76 

Abatements to Elderly, etc. 5,061.64 

Local Aid and Lottery 308,005.00 

School Aid 1,100,571.00 8,121,226.15 

Licenses and Permits: 

Alcoholic Beverage 6,200.00 

All Other Permits 26,979.95 33,179.95 

Court Fines 7,225.65 7,225.65 

Grants from State, County and Federal Govts: 

Federal Revenue Sharing 155,982.00 

Food Service - School 68,472.50 

Titles, Etc. 92,962.00 

Sewer Construction 103,756.00 

School Transportation 82,583.00 

School Building Assistance 101,879.79 

Highways 85,838.60 

Library Aid 5,015.50 

Dog Fund 1,568.34 

Gifts from Individuals 5,818.04 703,875.77 

Special Assessments 

Sewer 71,012.57 

Water 2,618.41 73,630.98 

Privileges: 

Motor Vehicle Excise 339,14 7.73 339,14 7.73 

Departmental: 

General Government 54,275.41 

Public Safety 32,419.07 

Health and Sanitation 63,951.15 

Veterans' Services 5,046.53 

School - Sale of Lunches 162,771.24 

School - Athletic Accounts 7,220.76 

School - Other 14,299.16 

Library 2,732.36 

Recreation 9,661.50 352,377.18 

Public Service Enterprises: 

Sale of Water 167,073.64 

Water Services 2,465.09 

Water Liens 19,652.70 189,191.43 

192 



Cemetery 



3,822.50 



$ 3,822.50 



Interest: 

On Deposits 

Taxes and Assessments 

Motor Vehicle Excise 

Investment Funds 

Library 

Cemetery 

Federal Revenue Sharing 

Group Insurance Trust 

Retirement 



604.50 

53,892.28 

851.22 

167,938.69 

8,386.79 

8,145.33 

8,426.89 

6,531.30 

13,719.38 



268,496.38 



Municipal Indebtedness: 
Anticipation of Revenue 
Other Temporary Loans 



3,200,000.00 
1,200,000.00 



4,400.000.00 



Agency and Trust Funds: 

Dog Licenses 3,755.25 

Tailings 1,264.66 

Federal Withholding 894,236.75 

State Withholding Tax 262,034.27 

Group Insurance 150,171.94 

County and Teachers Retirement 274,899.36 

Teachers Insurance and Credit Union 218,503.60 

Union Dues, Teachers' Cust., Sec. 28,655.64 

Perpetual Care Funds 7,000.00 

G.A.R. Trust 570.00 

Group Insurance Trust 282,263.50 



2,123,354.97 



Investment: 

Stabilization Funds 
Available Funds 



555,769.66 
17,959^466.00 



18,515,235.66 



Refunds : 

General Departments 

TOTAL RECEIPTS AND CASH ON HAND 



5,787.81 



EXPENDITURES 7/1/80 - 6/30/81 



General Government 

Selectmen and Executive 

Town Meeting 

Accountant 

Treasurer 

Collector 

Assessors 

Warrant Committee 

Town Clerk 

Town Counsel 

Election and Registration 

Planning 

Appeals 

Council on Aging 



194,899.50 

438.76 

9,163.00 

9,091.30 

15,194.44 

60,000.20 

83.96 

6,840.94 

12,720.24 

14,789.33 

15,758.23 

1,204.80 

16,484.00 



5,787.81 



$35,387,831.62 



19: 



General Government Cont. 

Town Hall $ 38,625.31 

Other 8,881.25 $ 404,175.26 

Public Safety: 

Police 470,174.69 

Fire 98,518.63 

Tree and Insect Pest 17,237.07 

Inspectors 17,361.08 

Sealer 556.00 

Dog Officer 20,357.26 

Civil Defense 2,673.17 

Miscellaneous 13,109.97 639,987.87 

Health and Sanitation: 

Public Health 36,917.33 

Sewers 123,325.85 

Sewer Project 42,250.38 

Landfill 91,031.13 

Special Articles 65,488.85 359,013.54 

Highways : 

Highways 315,571.95 

Sidewalks 3,984.03 

Snow 64,403.06 

Street Lighting & Signals 50,165,95 

Town Garage 11,487.00 

Special Articles 87,219.80 532,831.79 

Veterans' Services: 5,523.50 5,523.50 

Schools: 

Schools 5,447,102.55 

Cafeteria 230,546.45 

Athletic 7,023.11 

Regional Vocational School 109,860.20 

Custodian Detail 4,403.10 

Other - Titles, Etc. 96,822.29 5,895,757.70 

Library: 

Library Administration 66,890.77 

Library Expansion 85,860.48 152,751.25 

Parks and Recreation 64,602.44 64,602.44 

Contributory Retirement: 194,639.86 194,639.86 

Unclassified: 

Court Judgments 86,623.18 

Town Report 5,500.00 

Memorial Day 532.97 

Group Insurance 159,231.39 

All Other Insurance 111,962.00 

Conservation 96,214.50 460,064.04 

Water Department: 180,527.99 180,527.99 

194 



Cemetery: 


$ 18,269.14 


Interest: 




Serial Loans 


253,384.85 


Municipal Indebtedness: 




Anticipation of Revenue Loans 


3,200,000.00 


Other Temporary Loans 


1,300,000.00 


Serial Loans 


425,000.00 


State and County Assessments 




Audit of Municipal Accounts 


418.30 


State Parks 


49,568.97 


Mass. Bay Transportation Authority 


130,523.77 


Motor Vehicle Excise Bills 


1,377.60 


Metropolitan Air Pollution Control 


1,225.35 


Metropolitan Area Planning Council 


1,312.05 


Mosquito Control 


15,577.49 


County Tax 


126,035.30 


County Hospital Assessment 


2,448.73 


Agency and Trust Funds: 




Dog Licenses - County 


4,416.00 


Federal Withholding Tax 


894,236.75 


State Wishholding Tax 


262,034.27 


Group Insurance 


163,235.35 


Retirement Fund 


264,920.26 


Annuities, Credit Union, Dues, Etc. 


247,009.24 


Perpetual Care 


2,500.00 


Group Insurance Trust 


230,508.93 


Other Trusts 


770.00 


Investments: 




Available Funds 


18,139,466.00 


Stabilization Fund 


568,163.46 


Trust Funds 


13,719.38 


Refunds: 




Taxes 


43,249.59 


Motor Vehicle Excise 


11,206.03 


General Government 


48.00 


Public Safety- 


143.64 


Water 


312.36 


Sewer 


39.84 


All Other 


1,347.42 



Total Expenditures: 

Balance Cash at end of year June 30, 1981 

General 32,799.03 

Federal Revenue Sharing 92,689.28 

TOTAL EXPENDITURES AND CASH ON HAND 



$ 18,269.14 
253,384.85 

4,925,000.00 



328,487.56 



2,069,630.80 



18,721,348.84 



56,346.88 
35,262,343.31 

125,488.31 
$35,387,831.62 



195 



PERPETUAL CARE 



DeSorgher, L. Lee & Ruth M. $ 200.00 

Roberts, Florence E. 100.00 

Yancy, Gayton H.B. 100.00 

Hebert, Francis L. 100.00 

McCracken, John H. 500.00 

Band, Edward & Mary 200.00 

McNamara, Frank & Kathryn 300.00 

Maker, George 100.00 

Parmigiane, Ralph & Lorraine 125.00 

Chouinard, Juliette 100.00 

Grover, John & Mildred 500.00 

Edgar, John & Gayle 500.00 

Clancy, Thomas F. & Anna K. 200.00 

Tubridy, James & Barbara 125.00 

O'Brien, Eric W. & Claudette E. 500.00 

Morgan, Earl & Joanne 200.00 

0'Neil, Eileen 100.00 

Magnuson, John & Laura 200.00 

Folsom, Harold 100.00 

Nelson, Leon & Mary 200.00 

Mills, Melville & Virginia 500.00 

Martin, George & Florence 250.00 

Jeon, Andrew & Lillian 100.00 

Young, Marjorie 200.00 

Murray, Francis & Cynthia 900.00 

Calo, Anthony & Mary 250.00 

Mulloy, Laurence & Jean 600.00 

Gronroos, Alan & Carol 400.00 

TOTAL $7,650.00 



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198 



WARRANT FOR ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

1982 



Norfolk, ss. 

To either of the constables of the Town of Medfield, in said County, greetings: 

In the name of the Commonwealth, you are directed to notify and warn the inhabitants 
of the Town of Medfield, qualified to vote in elections and in Town affairs, to meet 
at the Memorial School, in said Medfield, on Monday, the 29th day of March, A.D., 
1982 at 6:00 A.M., then and there to act on the following articles: 

ARTICLE 1. To choose all Town Officers required to be elected annually by ballot, 
viz: 

One Moderator for one year. 

One Selectman, one Assessor, one member of the School Committee, two Trustees 
of the Public Library, one Town Clerk, and two members of the Park and Recrea- 
tion Commission, all for three years. 

One member of the Planning Board and one member of the Housing Authority, both 
for five years. 

QUESTIONS OF PUBLIC POLICY 

Question 1 

Do you approve of the sale of the Wollaston Recreational Facility, also 
known as the Wollaston Golf Course in Norfolk County by the County 
Commissioners? 



YES NO 



Question 2 



Shall the Town of Medfield be allowed to assess an additional $149,000. in 
real estate and personal property taxes for the fiscal year beginning 
July 1, 1982? 



YES 1 | NO 



The polls will be opened at 6:00 A.M. and shall be closed at 8:00 P.M. 

On Monday, the Twenty-sixth day of April A.D., 1982 commencing at 7:30 P.M., the 
following articles will be acted on in the Amos Clark Kingsbury School gymnasium 
in said Medfield, viz: 



ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to accept the reports of the several Town 
Officers for the past year. 

ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate and/or transfer from avail- 
able funds sums of money requested by the Selectmen or any other Town Officer, Board, 
Commission and Committee to defray operating expenses of the Town for the fiscal year 
commencing July 1, 1982, or such other sums as the Town may determine as required by 
General Laws, Chapter 41, Section 108, or do or act anything in relation thereto, 

ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town Treasurer with the 
approval of the Selectmen, to borrow money from time to time in anticipation of the 
revenue of the financial year beginning July 1, 1982, in accordance with the provi- 
sions of General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 4, and to issue a note or notes therefor, 
payable within one year, and to renew any note or notes as may be given for a period 
of less than one year in accordance with General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 17. 

ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will authorize the Collector to use all means in the 
collection of taxes as the Treasurer might if elected to that office. 

ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to fix the salary and compensation of the 
following elected officers: Moderator, Town Clerk, Treasurer, Selectmen, Assessors, 
School Committee, Trustees of the Public Library, Collector of Taxes, Park and Rec- 
reation Commission, Planning Board, Housing Authority, or do or act anything in re- 
lation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Personnel Administration Plan, 
effective July 1, 1982, to read as follows: 



PERSONNEL ADMINISTRATION PLAN 
CLASSIFICATION OF POSITIONS AND PAY SCHEDULE 



SALARIED POSITIONS 



Police Department 



Minimum 2nd Step 3rd Step 4th Step Maximum 



Police Chief 
Dog Officer 



$20,468. 
13,397. 



$27,237. 
14,601. 



Streets, Water and Sewer Department 
Superintendent 23,190. 

Fire Department 
Chief 18,578. 



30,920, 



25,080. 



Executive Department 

Executive Secretary 22,332 
Administrative Assistant 12,018. 

Board of Health 



35,959. 
18,215. 



Detached Social Worker 
HOURLY POSITIONS 



14,351. 



18,095, 



Library 

Library Director 
Children's Librarian 



7.40 
5.71 



9.01 
7.17 



10.20 
7.87 



Listed below is a 17-grade, 5-step hourly structure, in which all hourly graded 
positions are slotted. 



Grade 


Minimum Wage 


Minimum 


2nd Step 


3rd Step 


4th Step 


Maximum 


1 


$3. 


35 


$3.78 


$3.97 


$4.18 


$4.41 


$4.63 


2 






3.97 


4.18 


4.41 


4.63 


4.88 


3 






4.18 


4.41 


4.63 


4.88 


5.14 


4 






4.41 


4.63 


4.88 


5.14 


5.40 


5 






4.63 


4.88 


5.14 


5.40 


5.69 


6 






4.88 


5.14 


5.40 


5.69 


5.99 


7 






5.14 


5.40 


5.69 


5.99 


6.30 


8 






5.40 


5.69 


5.99 


6.30 


6.63 


9 






5.69 


5.99 


6.30 


6.63 


6.99 


10 






5.99 


6.30 


6.63 


6.99 


7.35 


11 






6.30 


6.63 


6.99 


7.35 


7.75 


12 






6.63 


6.99 


7.35 


7.75 


8.15 


13 






6.99 


7.35 


7.75 


8.15 


8.58 


14 






7.35 


7.75 


8.15 


8.58 


9.03 


15 






7.75 


8.15 


8.58 


9.03 


9.50 


16 






8.15 


8.58 


9.03 


9.50 


10.01 


17 






8.58 


9.03 


9.50 


10.01 


10.53 


*Lower 


rates as 


i authorized by the 


Commonwealth 


of Massachusetts may 


also be paid 



HOURLY GRADE LISTINGS 

Part Time/Temporary - (PTT) 

Regular - (R) 



GRADE 1 

Swimming Instructor (PTT) 
Lifeguard Instructor (PTT) 

$908. min. per season 
Library Aide (PTT) 
Playground Counselor (PTT) 
Lifeguard (PTT) 

$755. minimum per season 
Intern/Trainee (PTT) 
Laborer (PTT) 

GRADE 2 

Presently no jobs. 

GRADE 3 

Presently no jobs. 

GRADE 4 

Clerk Typist (PTT) 
Library Sr. Aide (PTT) 
Cemetery Foreman (PTT) 

GRADE 5 

Skilled Laborer (PTT) 
Secretary (PTT) 

GRADE 6 

Collector /Bookkeeper/Secretary (R) 

GRADE 7 

Police Matron (PTT) 
Skating Supervisor (PTT) 
Traffic Supervisor (PTT) 

GRADE 8 

Presently no jobs 



GRADE 9 

Senior Secretary (R) 
Truck Driver (PTT) 
Special Police Officer (PTT) 
Permanent Intermittent (PTT) 
Police Dispatcher (R) 
Call Firefighters (PTT) 

GRADE 10 

Presently no jobs 

GRADE 11 

Light Equipment Operator (R) 
Municipal Buildings Custodian (R) 
Senior Accounts Clerk (R) 

GRADE 12 

Wastewater Treatment Plant Operator (R) 
Heavy Equipment Operator (R) 
Water Technician (R) 
Groundskeeper (R) 

GRADE 13 

Equipment Operator Repairman (R) 
Assistant Wastewater Treatment Plant 
Operator in Charge (R) 

GRADE 14 

Tree Warden/Insect Pest Control (PTT) 

GRADE 15 

Presently no jobs 

GRADE 16 

Presently no jobs 

GRADE 17 

Street/Water/Sewer Foreman (R) 
Wastewater Treatment Plant 
Operator-in-Charge (R) 



SPECIAL RATE/FEE POSITIONS 
Part Time/Temporary 



Animal Inspector 
Waterfront Director 
Asst. Waterfront Director 

Deputy Collector 

Ambulance E.M.T. (PIT) 

Fire 

Deputy Chief 

Captain 

Lieutenant 

Clerk 



$738. per year 

$2,106 to $2,749 per year 

$131. to $180. per week 

$1,133. minimum per season 

Fee 



$8.59 per hour 



$1,119. per year 
$376. per year 
$285. per year 
$285. per year 



Playground Director 

Police Intern 

Registrar 

Registrar, Clerk 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 

Town. Counsel 

Tree Climber 

Veterans ' Agent 



$147. 


to $223. 


per 


week 


$161. 


to $210. 


per 


week 


$214. 


per year 






$516. 


per year 






$458. 


per year 






$9,953. to $16. 


,972, 


. per year 


$4.60 


to $7.45 


per 


hdur 


$2,671. per year 





Inspectors 

Inspector of Buildings 

Local Inspector of Buildings 

Gas Inspector 

Asst. Gas Inspector 

Plumbing Inspector 

Asst. Plumbing Inspector 

Wiring Inspector 

Asst. Wiring Inspector 

Health Agent 

Street Inspector 

Zoning Enforcing Officer 



$10.65 per inspection 
Annual minimum $2,061. 
Annual minimum $275. 
Annual minimum $569. 
Annual minimum $102. 
Annual minimum $1,683. 
Annual minimum $386. 
Annual minimum $936. 
Annual minimum $275. 
$10.65 per inspection 
$5.59 per hour 
$10.65 per inspection 



or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Personnel Board) 



ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Classification of Positions 
and Pay Schedule, Salaried Positions of the Personnel Administration Plan effective 
July 1, 1982 by adding the following new category under salaried positions: 

Assessors Department Minimum Maximum 

Deputy Assessor $22,000. $32,000. 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Assessors) 

ARTICLE 9. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Personnel Administration 
Plan, XI. VACATIONS , subsection 2., paragraph 5, as follows: 

"Vacations shall not be cumulative from year to year except under 
unusual circumstances with the approval of the department head. 
Any unused vacation days shall be used in the first quarter of 
the next calendar year." 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Personnel Board) 

ARTICLE 10. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Personnel Administration 
Plan, XIII. LEAVES OF ABSENCE , subsection A. Sick Leave , paragraph 2, as follows: 

" An employee in continuous employment shall be credited with the 
unused portion of sick leave granted under subsection (1) up to a 
maximum of one hundred twenty (120) days. Upon retirement or death, 
payment shall be made to the employee or the employee's estate for 
25% of those days accumulated over ninety (90) days." 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Personnel Board) 

ARTICLE 11. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Personnel Administration 
Plan by eliminating from the Classification of Positions and Pay Schedule the 
positions of Assistant Librarian, Recreation Coordinator, Playground Counselor 
and Assistant Dog Officer, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Personnel Board) 

ARTICLE 12. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Personnel Administration 
Plan, XV. SPECIAL PAY PROVISIONS , A. Call Back , as follows: 

"A. Call Back : When an hourly paid employee is called in to work on an 
emergency assignment, pay shall be no less than two (2) 
hours' pay at the appropriate time and a half rate, except 
Sundays and holidays when double time shall be paid. This 
does not apply to planned overtime." 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Personnel Board) 



ARTICLE 13. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Cemetery Commissioner to 
appoint one of its members as Cemetery Foreman and one of its members as Cemetery 
Laborer at the salary set out in the Personnel Administration Plan, or do or act 
anything in relation thereto. 

(Cemetery Commissioners) 

ARTICLE 14. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the sum of $5,070.05 under 
the provisions of Section 64 of Chapter 44 of the General Laws as amended for' the 
purpose of making payment to Bay State Gas Company for gas purchased to heat the 
town garage between June 14, 1979 and February 20, 1981, during which time the gas 
meter was not functioning, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

ARTICLE 15. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate and/or borrow a 
sum of money for the purpose of purchasing equipment for the Street, Water and 
Landfill Departments as listed, and authorize the Selectmen to trade as part of the 
purchase price, equipment to be replaced: 

To be Acquired Department Trade 

1 Ton Dump Truck Street 1 Ton 1976 Dodge Dump Truck 

1 10-wheel Dump Truck Street 1 1966 White Dump Truck 

1 Pickup Water None 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Streets, Water and Sewer Department) 

ARTICLE 16. To see what sum the Town will vote to raise and appropriate and/or 
borrow for the purpose of reconstructing North Street between Frairy Street and 
Station 17+00 (400 feet northerly of Green Street) and to authorize the Selectmen 
to enter into any and all contracts necessary for said purpose; and to authorize 
the Selectmen to apply for reimbursement from the State under the provisions of 
Chapter 351 of the Acts of 1981, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Streets, Water and Sewer Department) 

ARTICLE 17. To see what sum the Town will vote to appropriate for the purpose of 
resurfacing Hartford Street from the Dover town line southwesterly for a distance 
of approximately thirteen hundred (1,300) feet, or do or act anything in relation 
thereto. 

(Streets, Water and Sewer Department) 

ARTICLE 18. To see what sum the Town will vote to appropriate for the resurfacing 
of Clark, Alder, Juniper and Riverview Roads, or any of them, or do or act anything 
in relation thereto. 

(Streets, Watsr and Sewer Department) 

ARTICLE 19. To see what sum the Town will vote to raise and appropriate and/or 
borrow for the purpose of making drainage improvements to Route 27 in the vicinity 
of Kingsbury Pond, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Streets, Water and Sewer Department) 



ARTICLE 20. To see what sum the Town will vote to raise and appropriate and/or 
borrow for the purpose of installing a drain in South Street from Station 69 to Sta- 
tion 77+50 (near Clark Road), or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Streets, Water and Sewer Department) 

ARTICLE 21. To see whether the Town under and pursuant to authority granted in Gene- 
ral Laws, Chapter 40D, Section 21 (g), as amended, will authorize the Board of Select- 
men to enter into a contract with the owner or operator of solid waste disposal fa- 
cilities to be established in the Town of Plainville for the disposal of refuse, 
garbage and waste and for the use of recovered energy and materials resulting from 
the operation of such facilities, which contract will 

(1) be for a cerm of twenty years or less; 

(2) include provisions for the delivery of minimum amounts of refuse, 
garbage and waste and payments for the use of the facilities to be 
based thereon; 

(3) provide for unit prices that will be graduated and for adjustments 
thereof and for the use of steam, electricity and recovered materials 
resulting from the use of the facilities and for credits or payments 
to the Town resulting therefrom; 

(4) allow the use by the Town or other municipalities or private parties 
of the uncommitted capacity of such facilities; 

(5) contain other provisions incidental and related to the foregoing 
general matters; and 

(6) be generally in the form of proposed contract negotiated by repre- 
sentatives of the member communities of the 128 West Resource Recov- 
ery Council with such changes therein as may be negotiated by said 
Council and approved by said Board of Selectmen, 

or do or act anything in relation thereto . 

(Board of Selectmen) 

ARTICLE 22. To see if the Town will vote to accept Amendment No. 3 to the Agreement 
establishing the Tri-County Regional Vocational Technical School District ("Tri- 
County") as adopted by vote of the Tri-County School Committee on June 11, 1980. 
The Amendment provides in substance that in recognition of the adoption by the Town 
of Franklin of a home-rule charter, which eliminates the town meeting and board of 
selectmen, members of the Tri-County School Committee from Franklin shall be ap- 
pointed by the Chairman of the Town Council, Chairman of the School Committee and 
Town Administrator, acting jointly, and, further^ that for purposes of the District 
Agreement the Town Council of Franklin shall have the power to take actions required 
to be taken by town meetings of the member towns and notices required to be sent to 
the boards of selectmen of the member towns shall be sent to the Town Administrator 
of Franklin. A copy of the text of Amendment No. 3 is on file in the office of the 
town clerk where it may be examined during normal business hours, or do or act any- 
thing in relation thereto. 

(Tri-County Regional Vocational Technical 
School District) 



ARTICLE 23. To see what sum the Town will vote to raise and appropriate and/or 
borrow for the purpose of paying for land takings to be made by the County for the 
layout and relocation of a section of Farm Street from the Dover line to the MBTA 
railroad right of way, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

ARTICLE 24. To see if the Town will vote to transfer the following unexpended 
balances of revenue sharing funds to the Revenue Sharing Trust Account: 

Tone Alert, Article 19, A.T.M. 4/26/77 $ 53.00 

Fire Station Resurfacing, Article 8, S.T.M. 4/26/77 44.90 

Forest Street Drainage, Article 17, S.T.M. 4/27/77 41.61 

Harding & West Water Main, Article 14, S.T.M. 4/26/77 77.12 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

ARTICLE 25. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate, and/or transfer 
from available funds a sum of money to provide a telephone system for the Town 
Offices, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

ARTICLE 26. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate funds for the pur- 
pose of microfilming town records, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

ARTICLE 27. To see if the Town will vote to accept as a public way the following 
named streets, or parts thereof: 

Country Way from Station + 88.72 to 7 + 52.14 
Gun Hill Road from Station + 25.03 to 4 + 07.84 
Maplewood Road from Station 10 + 47.91 to 14 + 61.73 
Niantic from Station + 00 to 4 + 23.18 
Onondaga Road from Station 10 + 50 to 18 + 73.40 
Pueblo Road from Station + 25.05 to 10 + 57.04 
Saw Mill Lane from Station + to 16 + 45.54 
Spruce Way from Station + to 6 + 12.65 
Whichita Road from Station + 00 to 17 + 30.78 
Wood End Lane from Station + to 14 + 50 

as laid out by the Board of Selectmen and as shown on plans referred to in the Order 
of Layout on file with the Town Clerk's office and to authorize the Board of Select- 
men to acquire by eminent domain or other wise, such rights, titles and easements, 
including drainage easements, as may be necessary to accomplish such purposes, or 
take any other action relative thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

ARTICLE 28. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate funds for the pur- 
pose of providing recreation for the handicapped, or do or act anything in relation 
thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 



ARTICLE 29. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate funds for the pur- 
pose of providing an audit of town records, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

ARTICLE 30. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town boards and officials 
to set fees up to the maximum amounts permitted by the Massachusetts General Laws as 
they may be from time to time amended, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Town Clerk & Sealer of Weights & Measures) 

ARTICLE 31. To see if the Town will vote to adopt the provisions of Section 20A 1/2 
of Chapter 90 of the Massachusetts General Laws as amended making certain changes in 
the law relative to motor vehicles, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

ARTICLE 32. To see if the Town will vote to petition the Legislature for a Special 
Act relative to the licensing and keeping of dogs in the Town of Medfield authorizing 
withdrawal from the Norfolk County Dog Officer's Program, or do or act anything in 
relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

ARTICLE 33. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Town Bylaws rescinding and 
repealing Article VII - DOG CONTROL, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

ARTICLE 34. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money 
for the purpose of purchasing a 31 lb. Weight Set for the use of the Sealer of 
Weights and Measures, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Sealer of Weights and Measures) 

ARTICLE 35. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of Section 53E of 
Chapter 44 of the General Laws whereby the annual appropriation of a town department 
may in part or in the aggregate be offset by the estimated receipts from the fees 
charged to users of the service provided by the department if so voted by the Town 
when making said appropriation, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Library Board of Trustees) 

ARTICLE 36. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Town Bylaws by adding 
Section IX. WETLANDS, as follows: 

SECTION 1. PURPOSE 



The purpose of this Bylaw is to protect the wetlands of the Town of Medfield by 
controlling activities deemed to have a significant effect upon wetland values, 
including but not limited to the following: public or private water supply, 
groundwater, flood control, erosion control, storm damage prevention, water 
pollution control, wildlife habitat, recreation, and aesthetics (collectively, 
the "interests protected by this Bylaw") . 



SECTION 2. APPLICATION 

No person shall remove, fill dredge, alter or build upon or within one hundred 
feet of any land subject to flooding or unnundation, or within one hundred feet 
of the 100-year storm line, without receiving a permit issued pursuant to this 
Bylaw. Land subject to flooding or innundation shall include, for example, 
any bank, fresh water wetland, flat, marsh, meadow, bog, swamp, or land border- 
ing on any creek, river, stream, pond, or lake, or any land under said waters. 

The application for a permit shall be a written application and shall include 
plans that fully describe such removal, filling, dredging, altering, and build- 
ing and its effect on the environment. No such activity shall commence until 
after receiving and complying with the permit issued pursuant to this Bylaw. 

Such application may be identical in form to a notice of intent filed pursuant 
to Chapter 131, Section 40 of the General Laws, shall be sent by certified mail 
to the Medfield Conservation Commission (the "Commission") and shall be accom- 
panied by a filing fee payable to the Town of Medfield. The amount of the fil- 
ing fee shall be set by the Commission and published in its rules and regula- 
tions. No filing fee is required when the Town of Medfield files an applica- 
tion for a permit. The application may be filed before other permits, vari- 
ances and approvals required by the Zoning Bylaw, the Subdivision Control Law 
or any other bylaw or regulation have been obtained. Copies of the application 
shall be sent at the same time, by certified mail, to the Board of Selectmen, 
the Planning Board and the Board of Health. 

The Commission's costs for reviewing and processing the application shall be 
borne by the applicant. These costs would include, but not be limited to, the 
hiring of engineers or other outside consultants, if the Commission deems that 
to be necessary. 

Upon written request of any person, the Commission shall, within twenty-one 
days, make a written determination as to whether this Bylaw is applicable to 
any land or work thereon. When the person requesting a determination is other 
than the owner, notice of the determination shall be sent to the owner as well 
as to the requesting person. 

The provisions of this section shall not apply to work performed for normal 
maintenance or improvement of land in agricultural use nor to work performed 
in the course of maintaining, repairing or replacing, but not substantially 
changing or enlarging, an existing and lawfully located structure or facility 
used in the service of the public and used to provide electric, gas, water, 
telephone, telegraph and other telecommunications services. 

SECTION 3. HEARING 

The Commission shall hold a public hearing on the application within twenty-one 
days of its receipt. Notice of the time and place of the hearing shall be given 
by the Commission at the expense of the applicant, not less than five days prior 
to the hearing, by publication in a newspaper of general circulation in Medfield 
and by mailing a notice to the applicant, the Board of Health, Board of Select- 
men, Planning Board and to such other persons as the Commission may by regula- 
tion determine. 



SECTION 3.1. PERMIT AND CONDITIONS 

If, after the public hearing, the Commission determines that the area which is 
the subject of the application is significant to the interests protected by this 
Bylaw, the Commission shall, within twenty-one days of such hearing, issue or 
deny a permit for the work requested. If it issues a permit after making such 
determination, the Commission shall impose such conditions as it determines are 
necessary or desirable for protection of those interests, and all work shall 
be done in accordance with those conditions. If the Commission determines that 
the area which is the subject of the application is not significant to the in- 
terests protected by this Bylaw, or that the proposed activity does not require 
the imposition of conditions, it shall issue a permit without conditions within 
twenty-one days of the public hearing. Permits shall expire one year from the 
date of issuance, unless renewed prior to expiration, and all work shall be 
completed prior to expiration. 

Copies of the permit shall be sent to the Board of Selectmen, the Planning 
Board, and the Board of Health. A copy shall also be sent to the Registry of 
Deeds to be recorded with the deed. 

SECTION 3.2. RELATIONSHIP TO CHAPTER 131, SECTION 40 

The Commission shall not impose additional or more stringent conditions pursuant 
to Chapter 131, Section 40 of the General Laws than it imposes pursuant to this 
Bylaw, nor shall it require a notice of intention pursuant to Section 40 to pro- 
vide materials or data in addition to those required pursuant to this Bylaw. 

SECTION 4. EMERGENCY PROJECTS 

This Bylaw shall not apply to any emergency project as defined in Chapter 131, 
Section 40 of the General Laws. 

SECTION 5. PRE-ACQUISITION VIOLATION 

Any person who purchases, inherits or otherwise acquires real estate upon which 
work has been done in violation of the provisions of this Bylaw or in violation 
of any permit issued pursuant to this Bylaw shall forthwith comply with any 
such order or restore such land to its condition prior to any such violation; 
provided, however, that no action, civil or criminal, shall be brought against 
such person unless commenced within three years following the date of acquisi- 
tion of the real estate by such person. 

SECTION 6. REGULATIONS 

After due notice and public hearing, the Commission may promulgate rules and 
regulations to effectuate the purposes of this Bylaw. Failure by the Commis- 
sion to promulgate such rules and regulations or a legal declaration of their 
invalidity by a court of law shall not act to suspend or invalidate the effect 
of the Bylaw. Changes in the rules and regulations may be made at any time, 
after due notice and a public hearing on the changes. 

SECTION 7. BURDEN OF PROOF 

The applicant shall have the burden of showing that the work proposed in the 
application will not harm the interests protected by this Bylaw. Failure to 



provide adequate evidence to the Commission supporting a determination that the 
proposed work will not harm the interests protected by this Bylaw shall be suf- 
ficient cause for the Commission to deny a permit or grant a permit with condi- 
tions, or, in the Commission's discretion, to continue the hearing to another 
date to enable the applicant or others to present additional evidence. 

SECTION 8. DEFINITIONS 

The following definitions shall apply in the interpretation and implementation 
of this Bylaw. 

SECTION 8.1 

The term "person" shall include any individual, group of individuals, associa- 
tion, partnership, corporation, company, business organization, trust, estate, 
the Commonwealth or political subdivision thereof to the extent subject to town 
bylaws, administrative agencies, public or quasi-public corporations or bodies, 
the Town of Medfield, and any other legal entity, its legal representatives, 
agents or assigns. 

SECTION 8.2 



The term "alter" shall include, without limitation, the following actions when 
undertaken in areas subject to the Bylaw: 

(a) Removal, excavation or dredging of soil, sand, gravel or aggragate 
material of any kind; 

(b) Changing drainage characteristics, flushing characteristics, salinity 
distribution, sedimentation patterns, flow patterns and flood reten- 
tion characteristics; 

(c) Drainage or other disturbance of water level or water table; 

(d) Dumping, discharging or filling with any material which may degrade 
water quality; 

(e) Driving of piles, erection of buildings or structures of any kind; 

(f) Placing of obstructions whether or not they interfere with the flow 
of water; 

(g) Destruction of plant life, including cutting of trees; 

(h) Changing of water temperature, or biochemical characteristics of 
water which confines the water. 

SECTION 8.3 

The term "banks" shall mean that part of land adjoining any body of water which 
confines the water. 

SECTION 8. 4 



(a) The term "land in agricultural use" shall mean any qualifying wetland 
within a farm which is qualified or eligible to be qualified under 



the Farmland Assessment Act, Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 61A, 
Sections 1-5. 

(b) The term "qualifying wetland" shall mean only inland fresh water areas 
which are seasonally flooded basins or flats or inland fresh meadows. 

(c) The term "normal maintenance or improvement" of land in agricultural 
use shall mean only: 

1. Tilling practices customarily employed in the raising 
of crops; 

2. Pasturing of animals including such fences and protective 
structures as may be required; 

3. Use of fertilizers, pesticides, herbicides, and similar 
materials subject to state and federal regulations 
covering their use; 

4. Constructing, grading, or restoring of field ditches, sub- 
surface drains, grass waterways, culverts, access roads, 
and similar practices to improve drainage, prevent erosion, 
provide more effective use of rainfall, and improve equip- 
ment operation and efficiency, in order to improve condi- 
tions for the growing of crops. 

(d) "Improvement" of land in agricultural use may also include more ex- 
tensive practices such as the building of ponds, dams, structures for 
water control, water and sediment basins, and related activities, but 
only where a plan for such activity approved by the Conservation Dis- 
trict of the Soil Conservation Service is furnished to the Commission 
prior to the commencement of work. 

All such activity shall subsequently be carried out in accord with 
said plan. In the event that the work is not carried out in accord- 
ance with the required plan, the Commission may place a stop order on 
said work and have recourse to such measures as if the plan were a 
permit. 

SECTION 8.5 

The Commission may adopt additional definitions not inconsistent with this 
Section 8 in its regulations promulgated pursuant to Section 6 of this Bylaw. 

SECTION 9. SECURITY 

The Commission may require, as a permit condition, that the performance and ob- 
servance of other conditions be secured by one or both of the following methods: 

(a) By a bond or deposit of money or negotiable securities, payable to 

the Town of Medfield upon default, and in an amount, form, and surety 
which is sufficient, in the opinion of the Commission, to secure 
faithful and satisfactory performance of work required by the Commis- 
sion; and/or 



(b) By a conservation restriction, easement or other covenant running with 
the land, executed and properly recorded (or registered, in the case 
of registered land) . 

SECTION 10. ENFORCEMENT 

The Commission, its agents, officers and employees may enter upon privately 
owned land for the purpose of performing their duties under this Bylaw. 

Any person who violates any provision of this Bylaw or or any condition of a 
permit issued pursuant to it shall be punished by the maximum allowable fine. 
Each day or portion thereof during which a violation continues shall consti- 
tute a separate offense; if more than one, each condition violated shall con- 
stitute a separate offense. This Bylaw may be enforced by a Town police offi- 
cer or other officer having police powers. Upon request of the Commission, 
the Board of Selectmen shall take such legal action as they deem necessary and 
proper to enforce this Bylaw and permits issued pursuant to it. 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Conservation Commission) 

ARTICLE 37. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Medfield Zoning Bylaw to add 
to Section 5 "Table of Use Regulations" Section 5.4.5.11 "Low-level Radioactive 
Waste Disposal Facility" to be "No" in all Zoning Districts, or do or act anything 
in relation thereto. 

(Planning Board) 

ARTICLE 38. To see if the Town will vote to designate Orchard Street from the 
Norfolk line to the Millis line and Pine Street from Cedar Lane to Dover line as 
Scenic Ways, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Planning Board) 
ARTICLE 39. To see what sum the Town will vote to raise and appropriate to support 
an article for the update of the Master Plan in the area of s ingle- farailty and multi- 
family residences, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Planning Board) 
ARTICLE 40. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of Clause 
Seventeenth C of Section 5 of Chapter 59 of the General Laws extending the eligi- 
bility limits for the exemption of the real estate of certain surviving spouses, 
minors and elderly persons from taxation, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Assessors) 

ARTICLE 41. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning Bylaw for the Town 
of Medfield, Massachusetts by adding to Section 9, Non-conforming Usee, Structures 
and Lots, the following: 

"9.9 RESIDENTIAL LOT OF RECORD 

Any nonconforming lot lawfully laid out by plan or deed duly recorded or 
any nonforming lot shown on a plan endorsed by the Planning Board with the 
words 'approval under the subdivision control law not required' or words 
of similar import, which complies at the time of recording or such endorse 



ment, whichever is earlier, with the minimum area, frontage, width and 
depth requirements of the zoning bylaws then in effect may be built upon 
provided it is otherwise in accordance with the Zoning Act and all other 
requirements of this bylaw; providing however, adjoining nonconforming 
lots owned by the same owner of record on January 1, 1982 must be joined 
together so as to bring the resulting lot as close to conformity as is 
possible." 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

ARTICLE 42. To see if the Town will vote to instruct the Boston Edison Company to 
install a street light on the following named pole: 

Flintlocke Lane - Pole No. 125/22 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Petition) 

ARTICLE 43. To see if the Town will vote to rezone the RS portion to RU of Lot num- 
ber 139 and number 101 taken from assessors plan, Map number 37, and from Book 560 
on Page 45, Certificate number 111845, Norfolk Registry District. 

(Petition) 

ARTICLE 44. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Assessors to 
use a sum of money from Free Cash in the Treasury for the reduction of the Fiscal 
1983 Ta:; Rate, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Assessors) 

ARTICLE 45. To see if the Town will vote to accept the following named sums as 
Perpetual Trust Funds for the care of lots in the Vine Lake Cemetery, the interest 
thereof as may be necessary for said care, viz: 

L. Lee and Ruth M. DeSorgher $200.00 

Florence E. Roberts 100.00 

Gay ton H.B. Yancy 100.00 

Francis L. Hebert 100.00 

John H. McCracken 500.00 

Edward and Mary Band 200.00 

Frank and Kathryn McNamara 300.00 

George Maker 100.00 

Ralph and Lorraine Parmigiane 125.00 

Juliette Chouinard 100.00 

John and Mildred Grover 500.00 

John and Gayle Edgar 500.00 

Thomas F. and Anna K. Clancy 200.00 

James and Barbara Tubridy 125.00 

Eric W. and Claudette E. O'Brien 500.00 

Earl and Joanne Morgan 200.00 

Eileen O'Neil 100.00 

John and Laura Magnuson 200.00 

Harold Folsom 100.00 



Leon and Mary Nelson $200.00 

Melville and Virginia Mills 500.00 

George and Florence Martin 250.00 

Andrew and Lillian Jeon 100.00 

Marjorie Young 200.00 

Francis and Cynthia Murray 900.00 

Anthony and Mary Calo 250.00 

Laurence and Jean Mulloy 600.00 

Alan and Carol Gronroos 400.00 

And you are directed to serve this warrant by posting an attested copy thereof, 
in the usual place for posting warrants in said Medfield, seven days at least before 
the time of holding said meeting. 

Hereof fail not and make due return of this warrant with your doings thereon, 
unto the Town Clerk at the time and place of meeting aforesaid. 

Given under our hands this ninth day of March, A.D. Nineteen Hundred and 
Eighty Two. 

RichctAd P. VnSoightl. Chairman 
KznneXh M. CkiZcU, J*. , Clerk 
Rob&U J. tonkin 

SELECTMEN OF MEDFIELD 



INDEX 



Page 

Town Officers Elected 6 

APPOINTMENTS BY: 

Board of Selectmen 8 

Assessors 17 

Fire Chief 18 

Board of Health 18 

Planning Board 19 

Moderator 18 

Tax Collector 17 

Town Accountant 19 

Town Clerk 20 

Treasurer 20 

DEPARTMENTAL REPORTS: 

Aging, Council on 61 

Ambulance Department 38 

Animal Inspector 43 

Appeals on Zoning, Board of 51 

Architectural Barriers Committee 64 

Church Study Advisory Committee 56 

Civil Defense Department 40 

Conservation Commission 65 

Study Committee for Design Control 53 

Development and Industrial Commission 82 

Dog Officer 41 

Fire Department 32 

Health, Board of 67 

Historical Commission 58 

Housing Authority " 62 

Industrial Development and Finance 82 

Inspection Department 80 

Jury List 88 

Library Trustees 54 

Master Plan Implementation Committee 50 

Memorial Public Library 55 

Mosquito Control, Norfolk County 73 

Planning Board 47 

Police Department 34 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 79 

Selectmen, Board of 22 

Sign Advisory Board 52 

Streets, Water and Sewer 29 

Tree Warden 46 

Tri-County Regional Vocational Technical School 84 

Veterans' Services 78 

Water and Sewerage Board 44 

Youth Advisory Commission 74 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENTAL REPORTS: 

Administrative Assistant 111 

Adult Education 125 

Amos Clark Kingsbury School 112 

Athletic Director 1 26 

Buildings and Grounds Director 1 29 

Dale Street School 118 

Ralph Wheelock School 1 20 

Junior High School 117 

Graduation Exercises. High School 113 

Memorial Elementary School 119 

Pupil Services, Director of 1 22 

School Committee 95 

School Lunch Program 1 27 

Superintendent of Schools 95 

Teachers' Directory 1 00 

Tri-Valley Collaborative 1 24 

TOWN CLERK'S RECORDS: 

Births 132 

Marriages 1 36 

Deaths 140 

TOWN MEETINGS AND ELECTIONS: 

Annual Town Election, March 30, 1981 . 143 

Warrant and Proceedings, Annual Town Meeting, April 27, 1 981 1 42 

Warrant and Proceedings, Special Town Meeting, April 27, 1 981 177 

Warrant for Annual Town Meeting 1982 199 

FINANCIAL REPOR T S- 

Assesses Report . 182 

Contracts for Professional Services 1 97 

Perpetual Care 196 

Tax Collector 184 

Town Accountant. 188 

Treasurer 186 



NOTES 



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